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Re: Indelicate question Prei bottles

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  • richstillinwyo
    for a peri bottle go to a local medical supply store / phramacy and ask them to them them for you. If they can t or more likely wont, go to a bigger town and
    Message 1 of 27 , Feb 2, 2010
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      for a peri bottle go to a local medical supply store / phramacy and ask them to them them for you. If they can't or more likely wont, go to a bigger town and then ask. You could also go to the local hospital and ask them. They do work great. I have dispenced MANY of them. :} Another idea is an irrigation syringe will work too or a turkey baster..

      Rich

      --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "Kim Godfrey" <dobe.lover@...> wrote:
      >
      > We had a big discussion about this topic on another survival group last year, and here's my best answer. I do NOT want to have to mess with nasty reusable cloth that will be hard to get clean and sanitary! It's been mentioned that in some places, water is used, but what was mentioned was not a very convenient way to go about using it. However, a perineal cleansing bottle is perfect!
      > http://www.overstock.com/Health-Beauty/Medline-Lavette-8-oz.-Perineal-Cleansing-Bottle-with-Lid-case-of-50/1929221/product.html?cid=123620&fp=F&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=10248626
      > Sorry for the long link! I was given one at the hospital after I had my daughter, and I used it for several years before I had to throw it away (it got a small leak), because I used to get frequent bladder infections, and needed to be especially careful about cleaning that area. I have been unable to find them locally. I know, you're thinking, "who on earth needs 50 of them?" Well, when you consider buying just ONE for anywhere from $.93 to $2.50, and then paying almost $10 for shipping, this is a huge bargain, and you can always sell or barter the extras.
      >
      > Kim
      >
    • Buckshot
      Rich, For a more fixed situation would one of those plastic sitz bath kits (toilet seat insert and hose and refillable bag to hang on wall) work? Seen them
      Message 2 of 27 , Feb 3, 2010
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        Rich,

        For a more fixed situation would one of those plastic sitz bath kits (toilet
        seat insert and hose and refillable bag to hang on wall) work?

        Seen them used for healing repaired fistulas and drained abscesses, would
        they work for this too if you turned the hose around and fed from the front?

        Buckshot

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "richstillinwyo" <richstillinwyo@...>
        To: <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 11:42 PM
        Subject: [MSM] Re: Indelicate question Prei bottles


        > for a peri bottle go to a local medical supply store / phramacy and ask
        > them to them them for you. If they can't or more likely wont, go to a
        > bigger town and then ask. You could also go to the local hospital and ask
        > them. They do work great. I have dispenced MANY of them. :} Another idea
        > is an irrigation syringe will work too or a turkey baster..
        >
        > Rich
        >
        > --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "Kim Godfrey"
        > <dobe.lover@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> We had a big discussion about this topic on another survival group last
        >> year, and here's my best answer. I do NOT want to have to mess with
        >> nasty reusable cloth that will be hard to get clean and sanitary! It's
        >> been mentioned that in some places, water is used, but what was mentioned
        >> was not a very convenient way to go about using it. However, a perineal
        >> cleansing bottle is perfect!
        >> http://www.overstock.com/Health-Beauty/Medline-Lavette-8-oz.-Perineal-Cleansing-Bottle-with-Lid-case-of-50/1929221/product.html?cid=123620&fp=F&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=10248626
        >> Sorry for the long link! I was given one at the hospital after I had my
        >> daughter, and I used it for several years before I had to throw it away
        >> (it got a small leak), because I used to get frequent bladder infections,
        >> and needed to be especially careful about cleaning that area. I have
        >> been unable to find them locally. I know, you're thinking, "who on earth
        >> needs 50 of them?" Well, when you consider buying just ONE for anywhere
        >> from $.93 to $2.50, and then paying almost $10 for shipping, this is a
        >> huge bargain, and you can always sell or barter the extras.
        >>
        >> Kim
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
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      • Sheila Shepardson
        I use those reusable cloths and believe me they are not nasty and they get disinfected twice by using tea tree oil in a soaking container and in the wash.
        Message 3 of 27 , Feb 3, 2010
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          I use those reusable cloths and believe me they are not "nasty" and they get
          disinfected twice by using tea tree oil in a soaking container and in the
          wash. They are rinsed before going into the soaking container and washed at
          least twice a week. I use a quart bottle that does not have a spray but
          lift up lever that allows liquid to be squirted out without taking the cap
          off. (I bet even an old clean ketchup bottle would work as well). This
          really works well. I did try it "in case I needed to in a real emergency"
          and now would not want to go back. I am a nurse and know about keeping
          things clean and sanitary. I feel much cleaner using this method and know
          that I am clean. I remember the Frugal Gazette Amy Dacyzn (sp) saying some
          people will throw away an apple with just one bite out of it instead of
          cutting off that area and saving or using the rest of the apple. It is
          selective squeamishness....Of course you are not wrong and I am not
          necessarily right in our choices. I tried it and now prefer it....I
          committed to 1 week (to myself) and that was a year ago.
          SS

          On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 11:42 PM, richstillinwyo <richstillinwyo@...>wrote:

          >
          >
          > for a peri bottle go to a local medical supply store / phramacy and ask
          > them to them them for you. If they can't or more likely wont, go to a bigger
          > town and then ask. You could also go to the local hospital and ask them.
          > They do work great. I have dispenced MANY of them. :} Another idea is an
          > irrigation syringe will work too or a turkey baster..
          >
          > Rich
          >
          > --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com<misc_survivalism_moderated%40yahoogroups.com>,
          > "Kim Godfrey" <dobe.lover@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > We had a big discussion about this topic on another survival group last
          > year, and here's my best answer. I do NOT want to have to mess with nasty
          > reusable cloth that will be hard to get clean and sanitary! It's been
          > mentioned that in some places, water is used, but what was mentioned was not
          > a very convenient way to go about using it. However, a perineal cleansing
          > bottle is perfect!
          > >
          > http://www.overstock.com/Health-Beauty/Medline-Lavette-8-oz.-Perineal-Cleansing-Bottle-with-Lid-case-of-50/1929221/product.html?cid=123620&fp=F&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=10248626
          > .
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • dirtfarmer101
          When I was a kid we didn t have running water. We had a two-hole outhouse, without toilet paper. We used whatever paper we had. A Sears n Roebuck catalog
          Message 4 of 27 , Feb 3, 2010
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            When I was a kid we didn't have running water. We had a two-hole outhouse, without toilet paper. We used whatever paper we had. A "Sears n' Roebuck" catalog would last a month or two. It always provided reading material as the pages were torn out. If we ran out of paper we always went by the cobhouse on the way to the outhouse. Corn cobs were kept as kindling and was ground as filler in the cow feed.

            --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Young" <cayoung@...> wrote:
            >
            > I doubt the ink is the issue. Glossy probably doesn't work as well for cleaning action.
            >
            > Christopher A. Young
            > See me on the web
            > http://www.chrisyoungsshop.com/
            > .
            > .
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "georgiamountainwoman" <gamountainwoman@...>
            > To: <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2010 9:55 AM
            > Subject: [MSM] Re: Indelicate question
            >
            >
            > Isn't the ink from off newspaper and catalogs not good to mix with stuff from your insides ?
            >
            > --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "H L. Falls" <hlf@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > We used mostly commercial tissue though, because by the
            > > late 1950's the catalogs had gone to glossy paper.
            > >
            >
          • Michael
            Huh? ask them to do what for you please?
            Message 5 of 27 , Feb 3, 2010
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              Huh? ask them to do what for you please?

              On 2/2/2010 11:42 PM, richstillinwyo wrote:
              > for a peri bottle go to a local medical supply store / phramacy and ask them to them them for you. If they can't or more likely wont, go to a bigger town and then ask. You could also go to the local hospital and ask them. They do work great. I have dispenced MANY of them. :} Another idea is an irrigation syringe will work too or a turkey baster..
              >
              > Rich
              >
              >
            • Kim Godfrey
              I checked with every single store of both kinds in our area, within a 50 mile radius, and none of them had any. Furthermore, most didn t even understand what
              Message 6 of 27 , Feb 3, 2010
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                I checked with every single store of both kinds in our area, within a 50 mile radius, and none of them had any. Furthermore, most didn't even understand what I was asking about! I was given mine by the hospital where I gave birth, but I didn't think of asking them if they have any to sell, because hospitals aren't in the business of doing that. I have decided that I've wasted enough time on it, and I'm just going to order some from Amazon, as soon as the Master Card is paid down more.

                Kim

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: richstillinwyo
                To: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 11:42 PM
                Subject: [MSM] Re: Indelicate question Prei bottles


                for a peri bottle go to a local medical supply store / phramacy and ask them to them them for you. If they can't or more likely wont, go to a bigger town and then ask. You could also go to the local hospital and ask them. They do work great. I have dispenced MANY of them. :} Another idea is an irrigation syringe will work too or a turkey baster..

                Rich

                --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "Kim Godfrey" <dobe.lover@...> wrote:
                >
                > We had a big discussion about this topic on another survival group last year, and here's my best answer. I do NOT want to have to mess with nasty reusable cloth that will be hard to get clean and sanitary! It's been mentioned that in some places, water is used, but what was mentioned was not a very convenient way to go about using it. However, a perineal cleansing bottle is perfect!
                > http://www.overstock.com/Health-Beauty/Medline-Lavette-8-oz.-Perineal-Cleansing-Bottle-with-Lid-case-of-50/1929221/product.html?cid=123620&fp=F&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=10248626
                > Sorry for the long link! I was given one at the hospital after I had my daughter, and I used it for several years before I had to throw it away (it got a small leak), because I used to get frequent bladder infections, and needed to be especially careful about cleaning that area. I have been unable to find them locally. I know, you're thinking, "who on earth needs 50 of them?" Well, when you consider buying just ONE for anywhere from $.93 to $2.50, and then paying almost $10 for shipping, this is a huge bargain, and you can always sell or barter the extras.
                >
                > Kim
                >



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              • Bron
                In a disaster, water will be minimal. In that case, I d collect daily leaves for use, if I m near woods. A can with worms and dirt will compost toilet paper or
                Message 7 of 27 , Feb 7, 2010
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                  In a disaster, water will be minimal. In that case, I'd collect daily leaves for use, if I'm near woods. A can with worms and dirt will compost toilet paper or used leaves for dumping, later, with a can of clean dirt nearby to throw on top of the used stuff to keep smells down. Chamber pots would be dumped, later, as well, depending on what your options are after a disaster.

                  After an earthquake in a city, there's no working plumbing, no water, no electricity, no gas (heating or vehicle). It's anybody's guess whether you can* leave the city or not, and, where could you go if you did leave the city? So many buildings were destroyed in Port au Prince that everyone had trouble walking anywhere because of the huge amount of scattered rubble. Driving was out of the question, even if gas had been available.

                  After the tornado in Joliet, the rubble was flat (as opposed to lumpy like after an earthquake), but it was everywhere for 1/3 of the city. Walking, in that area would have been difficult, even though there were people wandering in a daze all over the place. I didn't try going into that area on foot because dead bodies would have been all over. It would have been dangerous to walk and breathe because of the mixed chemicals, and growing bacteria, within a day. If it had been hot, the blood, feces, and bodies would have begun to decay faster. I had to leave Joliet by going the other direction, driving along the river, leaving the city, and going way out into the country, before I could head back in a direction I wanted to go.

                  Another time, I lived in the woods for a few years with no plumbing and we used a chamber pot and "fertilized" the plants in different places each day away from the common area. We also dug a hole for an outhouse and emptied the solid wastes in that, until we realized that the liquid wastes helped the solid wastes dissolve and soak into the land.

                  I think the best ideas for such things are available by looking at how desert, forest, and jungle people have arranged their expanded living spaces and see how they handle such things. By expanded, I mean including the community area outside their personal spaces, and, including some land around it. You wouldn't want to dump waste in any water feature of any kind because you'd grow cholera bacteria (hideous), even if it was moving. No point in poisoning the neighbors downstream. Thankfully, we don't need to reinvent the wheel! Descriptions are available in all kinds of books on the subject of how to arrange sustainable living space, which can also translate into how to handle disaster.

                  Unfortunately, there are not going to be many people after a disaster who know these things. Who knows how they'll dispose of their waste or keep themselves clean.

                  FYI, Borax is being used in some hospitals as a disinfectant, instead of anti-bacterials that germs can become resistant to. It's also a mild abrasive. It stores better than hydrogen peroxide. I don't know how you'd use it if you didn't have water, though. Rosemary and Tea Tree Oil are disinfectants, but you'd need water to use them, as well.

                  If you can get ahold of any clean dirt (unpolluted) or sand, you can use it to wash most non-fiber things, like dishes. Put dirt/sand onto the dirty plate to soak up food particles. Push food and dirt off the plate into the compost can. Then, wipe the odd dirt pieces off the dishes.

                  When you change the environment on a surface often enough -- between hot and cold, wet and dry, light and dark, etc., you keep bad bacteria count for each environment low because it doesn't have enough time to grow before you change the environment again. Good bacteria grow faster than bad bacteria. That's why yogurt and old fashioned picklemaking (probiotics) can clean and preserve food for a time. Adding new milk to the old yogurt keeps the bacteria population healthy and regrowing. Having some young good bacteria and some old good bacteria is better than keeping all the bacteria young. I'm not sure why this is, tho.

                  The slightly acidic probiotics keeps bad bacteria down and food good for awhile. I used mason jars, put food in, put yogurt whey in, put a thin layer of oil over the top as a fermentation seal, capped the jars, and let 'em grow. When the gas calmed, which indicated that the probiotic fermentation was slowing, I capped the jars tightly and put them in a dark place. A month later, the food was still good and even still smelled fresh which amazed me. You shouldn't eat probiotic food exclusively, for a long time, but it'll keep you for awhile.

                  Keeping food edible is the same, in general. Grain gets soaked overnight. Eat what you want. Crush the rest and bake it into bread/crackers/whatever. Dry it into toast/croutons. Make bread pudding. Drop what's left in the sourdough bowl for leavening. Do this in any order, as long as you change the environment radically enough. (I left out freezing because I didn't have a fridge.)

                  My thoughts on city disasters are that there isn't going to be much left intact, including my food stores. I may be unable to reach my sleeping bag and blankets underneath all the rubble or thrown around the tops of trees by a tornado. Knowing how to use what I do have will be most helpful. Knowing when to "run for the hills" is also helpful. It took days to get anything into New Orleans after Katrina. People went nuts and robbed and killed each other or died of heat and thirst.

                  30 days without food will damage a healthy man enough to kill him afterwards. That's not a lot of time. I've heard that women die faster than that from lack of food, maybe because they don't have as much body mass to consume. Lots of people in Haiti left the city for the country where they could forage for food, find clean water, and live with relatives on their land in rural areas. I'd expect the same thing would be necessary, anywhere.

                  I learned a lot about disaster survival from Tom Brown's tracker books which taught me what to do when there isn't anything to do anything with.

                  I had an issue with the (am I remembering this correctly?) "Survivor Man" tv show, where the guy crossed a river, fetched gas, got a generator working, used cameras for security, made a ham radio, etc., after a supposed disaster. If you're the only one left who has this idea, then what he did would work. In my opinion, if there are a few gangs and warlords around looking to do the same thing, then, it's time to leave all that and head for the hills.

                  Just some random personal thoughts and experiences....

                  Bron

                  --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "jeannelookabill" <atasteofcreole@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > A bidet. OR, pieces of old t-shirts or old socks. EVERYONE has a bunch of old something?
                  >
                  > I used to use baby wipes all the time, very cleaning & refreshing! But the effects on the environment bothered me. One day thinking of my deceased grandmother. She used to keep a large coffee can next to toilet. It was for TP. Her terra cotta pipes were so old the tree roots clogged it.
                  >
                  > I do that now, but I use cheap white rags. I also NEVER use bleach, I use 3% peroxide solution. It's what hospitals use.
                  >
                  > Jeanne
                  > http://atasteofcreole.wordpress.com/
                  > http://www.linkedin.com/profile?viewProfile=&key=63265983&locale=en_US&trk=tab_pro
                  >
                  > --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, "Harry the Road Scholar" <road.scholar@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I try to prepare for various circumstances such as what if the power goes out and stays out for a while or for good. Same with food and all other manner of goods and services we have all come to rely on. But what if there was a situation and it lasted a really long time and we ran out of TP? How ... er what .... Cloth rags, maybe? We'd run out soon. Then what? Wash them like we do diapers? How did they handle this problem back in the good old days? Sorry, but I have to ask for help on this one. Leaves just are not suitable. Hay? Corn cobs? And how do you stockpile it? Just think of life in Haiti right now. They might be facing this problem.
                  > > --
                  > > Harry, the Road Scholar
                  > >
                  >
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