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Re: Anaesthetic or not, was RE: [MSM] Re: "partnering for survival" John

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  • Ed Harrison
    ... I don t think slugging someone in the jaw is a useful solution. first, if you break it, setting the jaw is a LOT harder than setting a leg. Second, a blow
    Message 1 of 160 , Jul 1, 2005
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      D McG wrote:

      >wjsvt@... wrote:
      >
      ><<I hesitate to suggest this. I’ve not been (thankfully) in a
      >situation where medical help was not available, so I may
      >just be “talking out my a**” but what of the possibility of knocking
      >a person unconscious prior to surgery? >>
      >
      >Wayne,
      >
      >I was actually going to suggest this possiblity, so I don't think you are talking out of the wrong end!! lol I just don't know anything about knocking someone unconscious but would have to rely on someone more knowledgeable. I would not risk a blow to the head but a blow to the jaw, if that will accomplish the task. I would think that unconsciousness would not last long so the "surgeon" would have to work quickly. Alcohol can produce sedation, but also may affect blood pressure which might be tricky if there has been blood loss.
      >
      >
      I don't think slugging someone in the jaw is a useful solution. first,
      if you break it, setting the jaw is a LOT harder than setting a leg.
      Second, a blow to the jaw _is_ a blow to the head; it it was', it
      wouldn't be effective as a knockout...
    • raysosc@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/13/2005 9:27:53 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ego_strength@yahoo.com writes: One pricy but legal alternative method of preparation is what
      Message 160 of 160 , Jul 14, 2005
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        In a message dated 7/13/2005 9:27:53 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
        ego_strength@... writes:

        One pricy but legal alternative method of preparation is what
        sailboat cruisers do. I've read advice given to these folks who
        live on the water, and who are often not able to access medical
        care, to consult and pay a physician to help put together a kit with
        more than your basic first aid supplies. This could include
        prescription antibiotics, anesthetics and analgesics. The physician
        could provide a signed letter stating the purpose and contents of
        the kit. This should keep most law enforcement and judicial
        authorities happy.



        Actually a ships captain is required to carry a certain amount of
        medical stores as well as have someone who is trained in their
        use, unless the ship is big enough to have its own doctor.

        I have two e-books that are just as useful on dry land as at sea.

        "The Ships Captains Medical Guide"

        and

        "The Ships Captains Medical Stores"

        I believe any blue water sailors can get medical supplies for
        their own use a lot easier than the rest of us.

        --ray


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