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Re: [MSM] Re: Water well pump

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  • JonquilJan
    Checkout Woodhenge in Adams Center NY (Google for the web site address). Jim has pump set ups for reasonable amounts. Jan New York Zone 4B Life isn t about
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 31, 2012
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      Checkout Woodhenge in Adams Center NY (Google for the web site address).
      Jim has pump set ups for reasonable amounts.

      Jan
      New York
      Zone 4B

      Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
      It's about learning to dance in the rain.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Wes Jones" <wes@...>
      To: <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2012 8:47 PM
      Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Water well pump


      > Looks like around $1,600 for a basic hand pumping setup. That's too high
      > for my budget, for sure.
      >
      > Best, wes
      >
      > On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 18:35:14 -0400, thinkwedding <mawoodman@...>
      > wrote:
      >
      >> Here's the 64 thousand dollar question, though--HOW MUCH! I don't trust
      >> sites that are cagey about the price--there's not a quotation anywhere
      >> on that one. Usually means it's out of sight pricewise.
      >>
      >> Marilyn
      >>
      >>
      >> --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, VeeWee111@... wrote:
      >>>
      >>> Try :
      >>>
      >>> http://www.simplepump.com/
      >>>
      >>> Have had one for about ten years, and have four deep cell batteries to
      >>> run it with electrical grid functioning, and to run it when power is
      >>> out. Just recently went without power for seven days with no problem.
      >>>
      >>> Plus it can be hand pumped if required.
      >>> E&B
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
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    • John Gilmer
      ... Well (sorry about that again) doesn t that include a good amount of pipe? But it is on the pricy side. I m trying to remember just how much it cost to
      Message 2 of 17 , Apr 1, 2012
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        On 3/31/12, Wes Jones <wes@...> wrote:
        > Looks like around $1,600 for a basic hand pumping setup. That's too high
        > for my budget, for sure.

        Well (sorry about that again) doesn't that include a good amount of pipe?

        But it is on the "pricy" side. I'm trying to remember just how much
        it cost to pull and replace our "deep well" pump. I believe it was
        less than $1k and that included new well wiring. OTOH, that was a
        few years ago.

        Electricity provides a lot of advantages to an isolated household.

        Even before the REA, rural farmers understood the usefulness of
        electricity and, again, until the REA put them out of business, were
        setting up wind charged battery power supplies. They even had a
        selection of 48 volt "appliances" like fans, lights, and even electric
        irons.

        There is no way a battery based system can compete with the grid but
        it's a damn good idea if one wants to be prepared for long term "off
        grid" living. Even if you decide on a gas/diesel generator, the
        battery will provide 24/7 power for "little things" like water,
        lights, and some power tools.

        >
        > Best, wes
        >
        > On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 18:35:14 -0400, thinkwedding <mawoodman@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >> Here's the 64 thousand dollar question, though--HOW MUCH! I don't trust
        >> sites that are cagey about the price--there's not a quotation anywhere
        >> on that one. Usually means it's out of sight pricewise.
        >>
        >> Marilyn
        >>
        >>
        >> --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, VeeWee111@... wrote:
        >>>
        >>> Try :
        >>>
        >>> http://www.simplepump.com/
        >>>
        >>> Have had one for about ten years, and have four deep cell batteries to
        >>> run it with electrical grid functioning, and to run it when power is
        >>> out. Just recently went without power for seven days with no problem.
        >>>
        >>> Plus it can be hand pumped if required.
        >>> E&B
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        > --
        > Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > ************************************************************************
        >
        >
        > Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
        > http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
        >
        >
        >
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      • Wes Jones
        On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 08:50:53 -0400, John Gilmer ... I didn t see how much pipe was included. Being it s a basic kit...likely not a huge amount. ...
        Message 3 of 17 , Apr 1, 2012
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          On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 08:50:53 -0400, John Gilmer
          <johnlewisgilmer@...> wrote:

          > On 3/31/12, Wes Jones <wes@...> wrote:
          >> Looks like around $1,600 for a basic hand pumping setup. That's too
          >> high
          >> for my budget, for sure.
          >
          > Well (sorry about that again) doesn't that include a good amount of pipe?

          I didn't see how much pipe was included. Being it's a basic kit...likely
          not a huge amount.

          > But it is on the "pricy" side. I'm trying to remember just how much
          > it cost to pull and replace our "deep well" pump. I believe it was
          > less than $1k and that included new well wiring. OTOH, that was a
          > few years ago.

          Submersible pumps run in the $250 range and up. Pipe for those is way
          under $1 a foot. I'm thinking around $0.30 a foot but it's been quite a
          few years since I bought any.

          > Electricity provides a lot of advantages to an isolated household.
          >
          > Even before the REA, rural farmers understood the usefulness of
          > electricity and, again, until the REA put them out of business, were
          > setting up wind charged battery power supplies. They even had a
          > selection of 48 volt "appliances" like fans, lights, and even electric
          > irons.
          >
          > There is no way a battery based system can compete with the grid but
          > it's a damn good idea if one wants to be prepared for long term "off
          > grid" living. Even if you decide on a gas/diesel generator, the
          > battery will provide 24/7 power for "little things" like water,
          > lights, and some power tools.

          I can't disagree with any of that. But I'd like to have a simple hand
          pump too, on my fairly shallow well. That's so I can step out the back
          door and get a container of water right now and with minimal fuss and
          bother.

          Best, wes

          >> Best, wes
          >>
          >> On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 18:35:14 -0400, thinkwedding <mawoodman@...>
          >> wrote:
          >>
          >>> Here's the 64 thousand dollar question, though--HOW MUCH! I don't
          >>> trust
          >>> sites that are cagey about the price--there's not a quotation anywhere
          >>> on that one. Usually means it's out of sight pricewise.
          >>>
          >>> Marilyn
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, VeeWee111@... wrote:
          >>>>
          >>>> Try :
          >>>>
          >>>> http://www.simplepump.com/
          >>>>
          >>>> Have had one for about ten years, and have four deep cell batteries to
          >>>> run it with electrical grid functioning, and to run it when power is
          >>>> out. Just recently went without power for seven days with no problem.
          >>>>
          >>>> Plus it can be hand pumped if required.
          >>>> E&B
          >>>>
          >>>>
          >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>
          >>
          >> --
          >> Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
          >>
          >>
          >> ------------------------------------
          >>
          >> ************************************************************************
          >>
          >>
          >> Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
          >> http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> ************************************************************************
          >> **IMPORTANT GROUP INFORMATION**
          >>
          >> Group Email Addresses
          >>
          >> Post message: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
          >> Subscribe: misc_survivalism_moderated-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >> List owner: misc_survivalism_moderated-owner@yahoogroups.com Yahoo!
          >> Groups
          >> Links
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>


          --
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        • VeeWee111@aol.com
          Hi Marilyn, Price depends on size of pump, depth of the static water level, and if hand pumped or electric motor powered. Hover your mouse cursor over the
          Message 4 of 17 , Apr 1, 2012
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            Hi Marilyn,
            Price depends on size of pump, depth of the static water level, and if hand pumped or electric motor powered. Hover your mouse cursor over the "Pricing" tab at top of the webpage and left click on any of the topics in the list that pops up there.

            Or

            You can get a quote from them @

            http://www.simplepump.com/Get-A-Quote.html

            If you really want to figure it out for yourself @

            http://www.simplepump.com/PRICING/System-Component-Pricing.html

            &

            http://www.simplepump.com/Support/Documents/SIMPLEPUMP-parts-detailed.html

            &

            http://www.simplepump.com/PRICING/Example-System-Pricing.html

            This last is the most helpful in the way of understanding a simple list of the system, and lists a price of $1,630.00 for about 86 feet total. If you want deeper you need more drop pipe kits. If you do not need the larger pump cylinder you could go with the smaller on and save $35.00, but we figured the bigger one was better due to less strokes of the piston, and rod linkage by moving more water per stroke would mean less wear.

            For us we needed only 4 of the 9 listed 109DPBE - Drop Pipe Kits (each of these has an outer PVC white plastic pipe with inside sucker rod that pushes/pulls the piston in the pump cylinder up/down, each is 9 feet in length, so 9 of these drop pipe kits means 81 feet of depth.), and at $40.00 each would reduce price by $200.00 today. Having a spare one of these drop pipe kits would not hurt just in case of drought or if one pipe breaks. Though it would be easy to fix the latter problem with some pipe glue and a coupler joint, it is so nice to be able to fix right away with a spare part on hand instead. Have had only one drop pipe in the 12 or so years break on us for no apparent reason.

            Since we have our pump in a fully insulated well house, the weep hole to prevent freezing of the well head of the pump was not needed and just glued the hole shut to get rid of the air that would otherwise get pumped into the system.

            We had a pressure switch to turn on and off the pump from the old well, but bought new lower pressure one for about $35.00, and set it to turn on at 15 PSI and shut off at 32 PSI.

            We used to have a Sear's 2,000 Watt jet pump (4,000 Watt about at start up) that was way too big for our use. Was kind of like having a dragster race car to drive through grid locked traffic. Filled our water tank too fast and ran too hot due to not running long enough even with large pressure tank. Found in first year after switching over to simple pump found we were saving about $20.00 in every bi-monthly electric bill!! Not huge savings, but something we did not expect.

            Having another full set of sucker rod bushings, spare piston, spare top bushing, and rubber seals for the well head and pump cylinder is a good idea to have on hand for repairs. If you install the electric motor get a spare cam bearing.

            When we had Barb's Dad here in full time care every other week after his stroke, he required two loads of laundry every day, and pump has needed full replacement of sucker rod bushings and upper/lower seals about every four years. We did get a Staber washer which uses a lot less water/electricity to help with these extra laundry loads. The main wear parts are the sucker rod bushings made of nylon white plastic. Between the two of us taking our time it is about 1 to 1-1/2 hour job to pull the pump up and replace all the wear parts and have it all back together running.

            We were among the first to buy one of these pumps. Since then there have been many improvements to the design. So one buying this pump today will hopefully have less problems than we did early on.

            Most often maintenance is every two months topping off with distilled water of the four deep cell batteries. We have had same ones for the last six years, and back then cost us about $75.00 each.
            This time frame between battery waterings could be extended with water miser battery caps.

            http://www.wholesalesolar.com/products.folder/battery-folder/water-miser-battery-caps.html

            If one is really mechanically inclined it would not be too hard to rig up an electric reduction gear motor off Ebay.com (just make sure it has enough HP and slow enough RPM for the pump) or even human powered bicycle, or wheel system like Romans did, or swing, or teeter totter, etc. to power the pump.

            The "CV-1 Check Valve & Pressure Gauge" one could find locally or on Ebay for a lot less than the $75.00, and the "SIM073 Safety Tool" could be made by hand with file and hacksaw in about 1/2 hour with 3/16" or thicker steel or aluminum plate if one wanted to save the $25.00 for that.

            One of the safety improvements we have made to our pump was to find a common white plastic plumbing "X" fitting that almost fit the OD of the pump cylinder. Filed one of the fittings openings till it just slipped onto the cylinder, then hack sawed four slots into the fitting so it could be hose clamped onto the lower end of the pump cylinder. This "X" fitting allows the use of a poly safety rope ( marine rope braid into place) on the "X" fitting so the pump can not be lost down the well when one of the drop pipes breaks!

            More on marine rope braid technique which is a lot more stronger and longer lasting than just knotting which actually weakens the rope @

            http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=A0oGklHvlHhPAkAAgflXNyoA;_ylc=X1MDMjc2NjY3OQRfcgMyBGFvA2FvBGNzcmNwdmlkAzJ6Uzd4a29HZFREZ0ttX2ZUajA0OHhFUUdCQi41VTk0bEpFQUJaeVIEZnIDbWNhZmVlBGZyMgNzYnRuBG5fZ3BzAzYEb3JpZ2luA3NycARwcXN0cgNtYXJpbmUgcm9wZSBicmFpZARxdWVyeQNtYXJpbmUgcm9wZSBicmFpZARzYW8DMQR2dGVzdGlkA1ZJUDAyMg--?p=marine%20rope%20braid&fr2=sb-top&fr=mcafee&pqstr=marine%20rope%20braid

            Next project is to have a water reservoir above ground in heavily insulated shed. This way we can have a second electric pump above ground pump to do the house hold pressure and relieve the below ground pump of that much more wear and tear. Will be installing a single valve to be able to switch to a reserve amount of water for several days to a week when below ground pump needs repair. If one got/built a reservoir before the pump install, it could be pretty easy to skip the electric motor for the pump and just use human energy (plus keep yourself in better shape) to pump once daily or weekly depending on water usage and size of reservoir.
            If one has a really slow well, with reservoir one could set pump electric motor with timer to turn on for short enough periods that well did not go dry, and turn back on often enough through the 24 hour day so reservoir stays full enough to stay ahead of demand.,

            Future projects that will take more wear off our well pump and improve other situations here are installing composting toilet system that use less water and later using rain water (for about 9 months of the year) piped in for the toilets from storage shed roofs uphill. The composting toilets will also reduce $$ outlay of having septic pumped every five years for $250.00 each time, vastly extend septic lifespan ($20,000 for designed septic required if present one fails), and can improve our upper sandy soil field with compost.

            E&B

            Marilyn wrote:
            Here's the 64 thousand dollar question, though--HOW MUCH! I don't trust sites that are cagey about the price--there's not a quotation anywhere on that one. Usually means it's out of sight pricewise.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Buckshot
            That was also the group that had the wind chargers set up like windmills and the ni-fe batteries, wasn t it? The old, pre-rea outfit, not the well pump outfit.
            Message 5 of 17 , Apr 1, 2012
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              That was also the group that had the wind chargers set up like windmills and
              the ni-fe batteries, wasn't it?

              The old, pre-rea outfit, not the well pump outfit.

              Buckshot

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "John Gilmer" <johnlewisgilmer@...>
              To: <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 8:50 AM
              Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Water well pump


              > On 3/31/12, Wes Jones <wes@...> wrote:
              >> Looks like around $1,600 for a basic hand pumping setup. That's too high
              >> for my budget, for sure.
              >
              > Well (sorry about that again) doesn't that include a good amount of pipe?
              >
              > But it is on the "pricy" side. I'm trying to remember just how much
              > it cost to pull and replace our "deep well" pump. I believe it was
              > less than $1k and that included new well wiring. OTOH, that was a
              > few years ago.
              >
              > Electricity provides a lot of advantages to an isolated household.
              >
              > Even before the REA, rural farmers understood the usefulness of
              > electricity and, again, until the REA put them out of business, were
              > setting up wind charged battery power supplies. They even had a
              > selection of 48 volt "appliances" like fans, lights, and even electric
              > irons.
              >
              > There is no way a battery based system can compete with the grid but
              > it's a damn good idea if one wants to be prepared for long term "off
              > grid" living. Even if you decide on a gas/diesel generator, the
              > battery will provide 24/7 power for "little things" like water,
              > lights, and some power tools.
              >
              >>
              >> Best, wes
              >>
              >> On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 18:35:14 -0400, thinkwedding <mawoodman@...>
              >> wrote:
              >>
              >>> Here's the 64 thousand dollar question, though--HOW MUCH! I don't trust
              >>> sites that are cagey about the price--there's not a quotation anywhere
              >>> on that one. Usually means it's out of sight pricewise.
              >>>
              >>> Marilyn
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> --- In misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com, VeeWee111@... wrote:
              >>>>
              >>>> Try :
              >>>>
              >>>> http://www.simplepump.com/
              >>>>
              >>>> Have had one for about ten years, and have four deep cell batteries to
              >>>> run it with electrical grid functioning, and to run it when power is
              >>>> out. Just recently went without power for seven days with no problem.
              >>>>
              >>>> Plus it can be hand pumped if required.
              >>>> E&B
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >>
              >> --
              >> Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
              >>
              >>
              >> ------------------------------------
              >>
              >> ************************************************************************
              >>
              >>
              >> Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
              >> http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> ************************************************************************
              >> **IMPORTANT GROUP INFORMATION**
              >>
              >> Group Email Addresses
              >>
              >> Post message: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
              >> Subscribe: misc_survivalism_moderated-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >> List owner: misc_survivalism_moderated-owner@yahoogroups.com Yahoo!
              >> Groups
              >> Links
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > ************************************************************************
              >
              >
              > Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
              > http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
              >
              >
              >
              > ************************************************************************
              > **IMPORTANT GROUP INFORMATION**
              >
              > Group Email Addresses
              >
              > Post message: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
              > Subscribe: misc_survivalism_moderated-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > List owner: misc_survivalism_moderated-owner@yahoogroups.com Yahoo!
              > Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
            • Charles Walker
              Home depot now has a solar generator ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 17 , Apr 3, 2012
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                Home depot now has a solar generator
                On Mar 26, 2012 1:55 PM, "nyebrenda23" <nyebrenda@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > We have a well with awesome water, but we're dependent on electricity to
                > operate it. When the power goes out, we have no water and are dependent on
                > downspout run-off. Any ideas how to purchase and set up a manual pump?
                >
                >
                >


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