Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Miniature book definitions...

Expand Messages
  • arnobernoarno
    http://lu.com/odlis/odlis_m.cfm miniature book A book conceived on a very small scale, measuring no more than three inches along its greatest dimension (height
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 26, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      http://lu.com/odlis/odlis_m.cfm


      miniature book
      A book conceived on a very small scale, measuring no more than
      three inches along its greatest dimension (height or width), usually
      printed in 6-point type or smaller and illustrated on the same scale.
      Not uncommon, miniature books include Bibles, almanacs, poetry,
      classics, juvenile literature, tokens, etc. Click here to see a page
      from a 20th-century miniature atlas (Kansas State University
      Libraries). Very tiny books, such as those used in doll houses, are
      usually produced photographically. Of interest to collectors,
      miniature books have an enthusiastic following in the United States.

      Click here to see a set of 18th-century Dutch miniature books in
      deluxe binding (Koninklijke Bibliotheek). An online exhibition of
      Miniature Books is provided by the Cushing Memorial Library, Texas A&M
      University. See also 4000 Years of Miniature Books (Lilly Library,
      Indiana University). For more information, see the Web site maintained
      by the Miniature Book Society. See also: miniature edition, miniature
      library, and necklace book.



      miniature edition
      An edition of a book in which the copies are of very small size
      (three inches or less in height and width), usually printed in 6-point
      type or smaller and illustrated on the same scale. Synonymous with
      lilliput edition and microscopic edition. See also: miniature book.



      miniature library
      In 1800, the English publisher John Marshall issued the first of
      several series of miniature children's books in glazed paper bindings.
      Each series included as many as 16 separate titles of diminutive size
      encased in a small wooden box with a lid to which an engraved paper
      label was pasted and an ornamental pediment added to give the
      impression of a glass-fronted bookcase. The text in each volume,
      usually didactic in intent, served to draw the reader's attention to
      details of the illustration on the facing page. The concept was
      imitated by other publishers of children's literature in the early
      19th century. For examples, see the online exhibition Miniature
      Libraries from the Children's Books Collections, courtesy of the
      National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. In
      modern publishing, the term is sometimes applied to a set of
      children's books sold as a single unit, often encased in a gift box,
      slipcase, or other container (example: The Dr. Seuss Miniature Library
      published by Collins in 2004).


      necklace book
      A small miniature book, usually containing blank leaves covered in
      leather or metal, made to be worn about the neck as a pendant
      suspended from a chain, ribbon, or thong, sometimes as a piece of
      jewelry. To see examples, try a keywords search on the term "necklace
      book" in Google Image Search.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.