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RE: [minciu_sodas_en] Re: Riders' Angles - and special call to ou r women

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  • Cayzer, Steve
    [Apologies if this is a duplicate...] Andrius and everyone. I think this project is great. I ve been following it silently, not contributing because A) I don t
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 25, 2003
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      [Apologies if this is a duplicate...]

      Andrius and everyone.

      I think this project is great. I've been following it silently, not
      contributing because
      A) I don't have much time right now
      B). You've already come up with so many great ideas between you all

      The only thing I would add is that social factors/community really do make a
      difference. I used to travel by bus a lot in Bradford (England) - lots of
      people take the bus there, it's a social event, part of life and it works
      (mostly). In Bristol, despite extra technology (eg signs on bus stops
      telling you when the next bus will arrive - which is a great idea btw)
      people tend to take the car. Why? The buses are more expensive (all owned by
      a single company, no competition), less reliable (especially with the
      traffic) and maybe, just maybe - people are richer (can all afford cars).

      I think you have to ask - what is the bus competing against? Answer - the
      car. Why would I take the bus rather than the car?
      - ecological (a big thing for me, maybe not for everyone)
      - convenience (Ideally, I don't want to have to worry about timetables. In
      London, you don't study the tube timetable, you just turn up, because you
      know that you'll never be waiting more than a few minuites for a tube. This
      will only work in highly populated areas of course).
      - time. Public transport should take a comparable time (or less!) to a car
      (I like your mathematics approach to this)
      - cost. Public transport should be cheaper than a car for a single person
      travelling. No question. It isn't always like that in England, particularly
      on the trains.
      - reduce worry. I don't have to worry about parking, accidents, or someone
      breaking into my car when I'm away. I can also drink. Or read. Or sleep ;)
      - social. I prefer public transport because it gives me a chance to 'people
      spot' and sometimes have really interesting conversations. Plus the
      aesthetic qualities you have explored. I guess that accessibility would fall
      under this category too - for disabled people. Also the general 'vibe' of
      the transport (eg not intimidating, clean and well lit, no gangs of drunken
      lads* looking for a fight...)

      My feeling is that technology can help (eg mobile phone reminders of buses
      on time/approaching/late etc - they do this already for the trains in
      England) but it is only part of the picture. The social aspects you are
      exploring are just as vital.

      I'll just finish by saying I think you are tackling a really important
      problem in some new and innovative ways.

      Good luck!

      Steve


      * I don't want to be over judgmental here - I once travelled on a tube train
      after the 'Great British Beer festival' - there were a whole load of drunken
      lads on the tube, full of bonhomie and singing songs. That was actually a
      *nice* environment. Similarly after football matches you can get a vicarious
      sense of community from a group of fans. But it doesn't always work that
      way, and some people might feel intimidated by it.
    • joe damal
      Greetings: I encourage everyone at Minciu Sodas who is interested in the issue of transit performance to also post your comments at the Campaign for Better
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 26, 2003
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        Greetings:

        I encourage everyone at Minciu Sodas who is interested in the issue of
        transit performance to also post your comments at the Campaign for
        Better Transit's web forum. Our web address is www.bettertransit.com I
        also welcome your suggestions on how we can make our site better. Feel
        free to contact me at jdamal@.... Thanks for your
        interest.

        Joe Damal
        Organizer/Researcher
        Campaign for Better Transit


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Cayzer, Steve [mailto:steve.cayzer@...]
        Sent: Friday, July 25, 2003 5:13 AM
        To: 'minciu_sodas_en@yahoogroups.com'
        Subject: RE: [minciu_sodas_en] Re: Riders' Angles - and special call to
        our women

        [Apologies if this is a duplicate...]

        Andrius and everyone.

        I think this project is great. I've been following it silently, not
        contributing because
        A) I don't have much time right now
        B). You've already come up with so many great ideas between you all

        The only thing I would add is that social factors/community really do
        make a
        difference. I used to travel by bus a lot in Bradford (England) - lots
        of
        people take the bus there, it's a social event, part of life and it
        works
        (mostly). In Bristol, despite extra technology (eg signs on bus stops
        telling you when the next bus will arrive - which is a great idea btw)
        people tend to take the car. Why? The buses are more expensive (all
        owned by
        a single company, no competition), less reliable (especially with the
        traffic) and maybe, just maybe - people are richer (can all afford
        cars).

        I think you have to ask - what is the bus competing against? Answer -
        the
        car. Why would I take the bus rather than the car?
        - ecological (a big thing for me, maybe not for everyone)
        - convenience (Ideally, I don't want to have to worry about timetables.
        In
        London, you don't study the tube timetable, you just turn up, because
        you
        know that you'll never be waiting more than a few minuites for a tube.
        This
        will only work in highly populated areas of course).
        - time. Public transport should take a comparable time (or less!) to a
        car
        (I like your mathematics approach to this)
        - cost. Public transport should be cheaper than a car for a single
        person
        travelling. No question. It isn't always like that in England,
        particularly
        on the trains.
        - reduce worry. I don't have to worry about parking, accidents, or
        someone
        breaking into my car when I'm away. I can also drink. Or read. Or sleep
        ;)
        - social. I prefer public transport because it gives me a chance to
        'people
        spot' and sometimes have really interesting conversations. Plus the
        aesthetic qualities you have explored. I guess that accessibility would
        fall
        under this category too - for disabled people. Also the general 'vibe'
        of
        the transport (eg not intimidating, clean and well lit, no gangs of
        drunken
        lads* looking for a fight...)

        My feeling is that technology can help (eg mobile phone reminders of
        buses
        on time/approaching/late etc - they do this already for the trains in
        England) but it is only part of the picture. The social aspects you are
        exploring are just as vital.

        I'll just finish by saying I think you are tackling a really important
        problem in some new and innovative ways.

        Good luck!

        Steve


        * I don't want to be over judgmental here - I once travelled on a tube
        train
        after the 'Great British Beer festival' - there were a whole load of
        drunken
        lads on the tube, full of bonhomie and singing songs. That was actually
        a
        *nice* environment. Similarly after football matches you can get a
        vicarious
        sense of community from a group of fans. But it doesn't always work that
        way, and some people might feel intimidated by it.




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