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Head alignment

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  • mtrsickleman47
    I recently purchased a used but well cared for Enco mill (20yrs old). Round column,run-of-the-mill....mill drill.The previous owner has equiped it with a lazer
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2003
      I recently purchased a used but well cared for Enco mill (20yrs
      old). Round column,run-of-the-mill....mill drill.The previous owner
      has equiped it with a lazer pointer on the head to make it easier to
      align the head after you raise or lower it using a vertical
      reference line on the opposite wall,a method I'm sure most of you
      are familiar with.
      Being new to milling, my 1st question is what is the best
      conventional way to line the head up so I can get my reference line
      established on the wall? I have leveled the mill with a Starrett
      machinist level, and I have tried clamping a square to the table and
      using a test indicator in the spindle.Running the test indicator
      along the blade of the square. The best I've gotten so far is .005
      across the Y axis. 2nd-How good is good enough for a used Enco mill
      drill? And 3rd-I know some are going have better results than others
      but what range (0 to 00?) of accuracy should I strive for?
      I realize it will never grow up to be a Bridgeport.
      Thanks for your help! Zort
    • rlincolnh
      Here s something from a newbie who doesn t even own a mill...yet (it s not far away, I hope). But the only way to learn is to dive in, so let s see what
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 2, 2003
        Here's something from a newbie who doesn't even own a mill...yet (it's
        not far away, I hope). But the only way to learn is to dive in, so
        let's see what responses I get to this post!

        As I understand it, holding an indicator in the spindle and traversing
        the table underneath it won't tell you anything about the
        perpendicularity of the spindle and table - it will only tell you if
        your table 'thickness' changes along it's length. To check the
        perpendicularity, the the indicator measuring point must be moved in
        space e.g. by mounting it in the spindle so that the tip is some
        radial distance from the spindle centre, touch it to the (stationary)
        table, then rotate the spindle 180 degrees and check the table again
        at the new point.

        My apologies if this is what you have already been doing, but the way
        I read your post it seems that the indicator was stationary.

        Have I got this right? All responses welcome (but pls don't be toooo
        hard on a newbie)...

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "mtrsickleman47"
        <mtrsickleman@e...> wrote:
        > I recently purchased a used but well cared for Enco mill (20yrs
        > old). Round column,run-of-the-mill....mill drill.The previous owner
        > has equiped it with a lazer pointer on the head to make it easier to
        > align the head after you raise or lower it using a vertical
        > reference line on the opposite wall,a method I'm sure most of you
        > are familiar with.
        > Being new to milling, my 1st question is what is the best
        > conventional way to line the head up so I can get my reference line
        > established on the wall? I have leveled the mill with a Starrett
        > machinist level, and I have tried clamping a square to the table and
        > using a test indicator in the spindle.Running the test indicator
        > along the blade of the square. The best I've gotten so far is .005
        > across the Y axis. 2nd-How good is good enough for a used Enco mill
        > drill? And 3rd-I know some are going have better results than others
        > but what range (0 to 00?) of accuracy should I strive for?
        > I realize it will never grow up to be a Bridgeport.
        > Thanks for your help! Zort
      • Jerry Stephenson
        Yes. That s how you check the tram on a mill. --Jerry ... From: rlincolnh To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2003 4:54 PM Subject:
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 2, 2003
          Yes. That's how you check the "tram" on a mill.  --Jerry
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: rlincolnh
          Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2003 4:54 PM
          Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Head alignment

          Here's something from a newbie who doesn't even own a mill...yet (it's
          not far away, I hope). But the only way to learn is to dive in, so
          let's see what responses I get to this post!

          As I understand it, holding an indicator in the spindle and traversing
          the table underneath it won't tell you anything about the
          perpendicularity of the spindle and table - it will only tell you if
          your table 'thickness' changes along it's length. To check the
          perpendicularity, the the indicator measuring point must be moved in
          space e.g. by mounting it in the spindle so that the tip is some
          radial distance from the spindle centre, touch it to the (stationary)
          table, then rotate the spindle 180 degrees and check the table again
          at the new point.

          My apologies if this is what you have already been doing, but the way
          I read your post it seems that the indicator was stationary.

          Have I got this right? All responses welcome (but pls don't be toooo
          hard on a newbie)...

          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "mtrsickleman47"
          <mtrsickleman@e...> wrote:
          > I recently purchased a used but well cared for Enco mill (20yrs
          > old). Round column,run-of-the-mill....mill drill.The previous owner
          > has equiped it with a lazer pointer on the head to make it easier to
          > align the head after you raise or lower it using a vertical
          > reference line on the opposite wall,a method I'm sure most of you
          > are familiar with.
          > Being new to milling, my 1st question is what is the best
          > conventional way to line the head up so I can get my reference line
          > established on the wall? I have leveled the mill with a Starrett
          > machinist level, and I have tried clamping a square to the table and
          > using a test indicator in the spindle.Running the test indicator
          > along the blade of the square. The best I've gotten so far is .005
          > across the Y axis. 2nd-How good is good enough for a used Enco mill
          > drill? And 3rd-I know some are going have better results than others
          > but what range (0 to 00?) of accuracy should I strive for?
          > I realize it will never grow up to be a Bridgeport.
          > Thanks for your help! Zort



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