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New to Mill-Drills and to this group

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  • scottbosecker
    I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott s Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos
    Message 1 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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      I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.

      I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.

      First question is what is it that I have here? I've done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.

      While the Mill-Drill name plate shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?

      I look forward to member's thoughts on this machine.

      Scott
    • Corey Renner
      It looks like an RF-20 or 25, the tipoff is the skinny column, the RF-30/31 & RF-40 machines have a much more substantial column. You probably have 3-1/2 of
      Message 2 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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        It looks like an RF-20 or 25, the tipoff is the skinny column, the RF-30/31 & RF-40 machines have a much more substantial column.  You probably have 3-1/2" of quill travel instead of the ~5" on the bigger machines.  The motor looks stock, so the pulley probably is too.  They might not have labeled the speeds for that last pulley position because they were so close to the speeds of other combinations that it didn't matter.  OR, they might have run out of one type of pulley and substituted another.  In any case, if you are concerned about your actual rpm's, you should verify the speeds with an optical tach.  I have a lot of machines and the spindle speeds on all the data plates that I have ever checked have been wrong.

        cheers,
        c



        On Thu, Aug 8, 2013 at 9:22 AM, scottbosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
         

        I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.

        I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.

        First question is what is it that I have here? I've done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.

        While the Mill-Drill name plate shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?

        I look forward to member's thoughts on this machine.

        Scott


      • dhlh1984
        Scott, It looks for all the world like a Central Machine 981 that someone has changed the motor pully on. The motor pully should have 3 step with a larger
        Message 3 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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          Scott,

          It looks for all the world like a Central Machine 981 that someone has changed the motor pully on. The motor pully should have 3 step with a larger range of sizes. When I get mine in the shop I'll measure the pully sizes. Hang on to your manual, they are like gold and hard to get hold of. If I don't get a copy in the next week or so I may be ashing for a copy.

          D.Hair
          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "scottbosecker" <sbosecker@...> wrote:
          >
          > I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.
          >
          > I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.
          >
          > First question is what is it that I have here? I've done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.
          >
          > While the Mill-Drill name plate shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?
          >
          > I look forward to member's thoughts on this machine.
          >
          > Scott
          >
        • Scott E Bosecker
          Corey, Thanks for your post. If one is of a certain age, the ôlabel makerö plastic strip with the model number embossed on it is a familiar sight. However
          Message 4 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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            Corey,
             
            Thanks for your post.
             
            If one is of a certain age, the “label maker” plastic strip with the model number embossed on it is a familiar sight.  However it did make me wonder what information was written on the plate under it.
             
            A little more information to add to the mix:
             
            I got a max quill travel of 3-3/4” when I measured with a tape rule.  The table is 6-1/4” x 20-1/4”.
             
            Best regards,
             
            Scott
             
            Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:07 PM
            Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
             
             

            It looks like an RF-20 or 25, the tipoff is the skinny column, the RF-30/31 & RF-40 machines have a much more substantial column.  You probably have 3-1/2" of quill travel instead of the ~5" on the bigger machines.  The motor looks stock, so the pulley probably is too.  They might not have labeled the speeds for that last pulley position because they were so close to the speeds of other combinations that it didn't matter.  OR, they might have run out of one type of pulley and substituted another.  In any case, if you are concerned about your actual rpm's, you should verify the speeds with an optical tach.  I have a lot of machines and the spindle speeds on all the data plates that I have ever checked have been wrong.
             
            cheers,
            c
             


            On Thu, Aug 8, 2013 at 9:22 AM, scottbosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
             

            I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.

            I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.

            First question is what is it that I have here? I've done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.

            While the Mill-Drill name plate shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?

            I look forward to member's thoughts on this machine.

            Scott

             
          • Scott E Bosecker
            D.Hair, Thanks for your post! The photocopied Central Machinery 981/590 manual that I have shows 12 speeds with 4-step pulleys on all 3 shafts. Best regards,
            Message 5 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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              D.Hair,
               
              Thanks for your post!
               
              The photocopied Central Machinery 981/590 manual that I have shows 12 speeds with 4-step pulleys on all 3 shafts.
               
              Best regards,
               
              Scott
               
              From: dhlh1984
              Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:11 PM
              Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
               
               


              Scott,

              It looks for all the world like a Central Machine 981 that someone has changed the motor pully on. The motor pully should have 3 step with a larger range of sizes. When I get mine in the shop I'll measure the pully sizes. Hang on to your manual, they are like gold and hard to get hold of. If I don't get a copy in the next week or so I may be ashing for a copy.

              D.Hair
              --- In mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com, "scottbosecker" <sbosecker@...> wrote:

              >
              > I just acquired a
              used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.
              >
              > I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal
              and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.
              >
              > First question is what is it that I have here? I've
              done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.
              >
              > While the Mill-Drill name plate
              shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?
              >
              > I look forward to member's
              thoughts on this machine.
              >
              > Scott
              >

            • Scott E Bosecker
              I just tracked down the Rong Fu RF-20 / RF-25 manual in the Files Section of the Group. Based on the tables size associated with the RF-20 in the manual, it
              Message 6 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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                I just tracked down the Rong Fu RF-20 / RF-25 manual in the Files Section of the Group.
                 
                Based on the tables size associated with the RF-20 in the manual, it appears that I have a RF-20 Mill-Drill.
                 
                Scott
                 
                Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:25 PM
                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                 
                 

                Corey,
                 
                Thanks for your post.
                 
                If one is of a certain age, the “label maker” plastic strip with the model number embossed on it is a familiar sight.  However it did make me wonder what information was written on the plate under it.
                 
                A little more information to add to the mix:
                 
                I got a max quill travel of 3-3/4” when I measured with a tape rule.  The table is 6-1/4” x 20-1/4”.
                 
                Best regards,
                 
                Scott
                 
                Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:07 PM
                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                 
                 

                It looks like an RF-20 or 25, the tipoff is the skinny column, the RF-30/31 & RF-40 machines have a much more substantial column.  You probably have 3-1/2" of quill travel instead of the ~5" on the bigger machines.  The motor looks stock, so the pulley probably is too.  They might not have labeled the speeds for that last pulley position because they were so close to the speeds of other combinations that it didn't matter.  OR, they might have run out of one type of pulley and substituted another.  In any case, if you are concerned about your actual rpm's, you should verify the speeds with an optical tach.  I have a lot of machines and the spindle speeds on all the data plates that I have ever checked have been wrong.
                 
                cheers,
                c
                 


                On Thu, Aug 8, 2013 at 9:22 AM, scottbosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                 

                I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.

                I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.

                First question is what is it that I have here? I've done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.

                While the Mill-Drill name plate shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?

                I look forward to member's thoughts on this machine.

                Scott

                 
              • Guenther Paul
                I have a manual on the way so just stay cool and wait. Rome was not build in 1 day. GP ________________________________ From: Scott E Bosecker
                Message 7 of 18 , Aug 8, 2013
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                  I have a manual on the way so just stay cool and wait. Rome was not build in 1 day.
                   
                  GP

                  From: Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...>
                  To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2013 2:45 PM
                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                   
                  I just tracked down the Rong Fu RF-20 / RF-25 manual in the Files Section of the Group.
                   
                  Based on the tables size associated with the RF-20 in the manual, it appears that I have a RF-20 Mill-Drill.
                   
                  Scott
                   
                  Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:25 PM
                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                   
                   
                  Corey,
                   
                  Thanks for your post.
                   
                  If one is of a certain age, the “label maker” plastic strip with the model number embossed on it is a familiar sight.  However it did make me wonder what information was written on the plate under it.
                   
                  A little more information to add to the mix:
                   
                  I got a max quill travel of 3-3/4” when I measured with a tape rule.  The table is 6-1/4” x 20-1/4”.
                   
                  Best regards,
                   
                  Scott
                   
                  Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:07 PM
                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                   
                   
                  It looks like an RF-20 or 25, the tipoff is the skinny column, the RF-30/31 & RF-40 machines have a much more substantial column.  You probably have 3-1/2" of quill travel instead of the ~5" on the bigger machines.  The motor looks stock, so the pulley probably is too.  They might not have labeled the speeds for that last pulley position because they were so close to the speeds of other combinations that it didn't matter.  OR, they might have run out of one type of pulley and substituted another.  In any case, if you are concerned about your actual rpm's, you should verify the speeds with an optical tach.  I have a lot of machines and the spindle speeds on all the data plates that I have ever checked have been wrong.
                   
                  cheers,
                  c
                   
                   
                  Blog:
                  http://coreyrenner.tumblr.com/
                   
                  YouTube Channel:
                  http://www.youtube.com/user/vandal968
                  On Thu, Aug 8, 2013 at 9:22 AM, scottbosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                   
                  I just acquired a used Mill-Drill. I am the third owner. I have posted pictures of this machine in the Scott's Mill-Drill folder located in the Photos section of this group.

                  I confess that I am a complete newbie to machining metal and I'm hoping to learn a lot from this group and experimenting with the machine.

                  First question is what is it that I have here? I've done some internet searching for the make and model on the name plate (MSC 951200) with very little result. The owner had a photo-copy of a Central Machinery Model 590/891 Instruction Manual that came with the machine. The information plate on the motor dates the motor from 1983 so I assume that the Mill-Drill is of the same era.

                  While the Mill-Drill name plate shows this machine to be 8 speeds but the pulleys seem to be set up for 12 speeds to me. The motor pulley had 4 steps instead of the 3 pictured on the name plate. I'm I missing something?

                  I look forward to member's thoughts on this machine.

                  Scott

                   
                • Mar
                  Here s nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z): http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm It s a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even
                  Message 8 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                    Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                    http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                    It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.
                  • Scott E Bosecker
                    Mar, I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle... HSM? Home Shop Milling? ER25 collets... These can be adapted – if that’s the right word
                    Message 9 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                      Mar,
                       
                      I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                       
                      HSM?  Home Shop Milling?
                       
                      ER25 collets...  These can be adapted – if that’s the right word – to my ER8 mill-drill?
                       
                      Best regards,
                       
                      Scott
                       
                      From: Mar
                      Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                      Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                       
                       



                      Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                      http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                      It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.

                    • Corey Renner
                      Home Shop Machining/Machinist. ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out. These machines are available with R8 or MT3 spindles. The R8 variety are
                      Message 10 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                        Home Shop Machining/Machinist.

                        ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out.  These machines are available with R8 or MT3 spindles.  The R8 variety are more common in the US, and the MT3 versions are more common in the UK.  If you go this route, there is a trade-off between the size of the ER collet system you choose, and how far it sticks out from the spindle.  ER's (that I've seen) go from ER11 to ER32.  The bigger the number, the bigger the capacity and stickout from the spindle.

                        cheers,
                        c



                        On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM, Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                         

                        Mar,
                         
                        I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                         
                        HSM?  Home Shop Milling?
                         
                        ER25 collets...  These can be adapted – if that’s the right word – to my ER8 mill-drill?
                         
                        Best regards,
                         
                        Scott
                         
                        From: Mar
                        Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                        Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                         
                         



                        Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                        http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                        It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.


                      • Paul
                        I have a full set of ER40 collets (up to 1.024 inches) and an R8 collet chuck for use on my X3 small size mill (although I use them more with my lathe ER40
                        Message 11 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                          I have a full set of ER40 collets (up to 1.024 inches) and an R8 collet chuck for use on my X3 small size mill (although I use them more with my lathe ER40 chuck). These collets are nice for the mill when you need to hold non-standard size tools. drill reamers etc., but I've found that the chuck does impart .001 to .002 additional runout to the tool and more than two (2) inches to the spindle length. For my purposes I normally use R8 collets which allow the extra clearance. For some uses an R8 tool holder would be recommended to eliminate the possibility of the tool slipping or being drawn out of the collet, but I haven't had this problem.

                          Paul H.

                          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Corey Renner <vandal968@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Home Shop Machining/Machinist.
                          >
                          > ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out. These machines are
                          > available with R8 or MT3 spindles. The R8 variety are more common in the
                          > US, and the MT3 versions are more common in the UK. If you go this route,
                          > there is a trade-off between the size of the ER collet system you choose,
                          > and how far it sticks out from the spindle. ER's (that I've seen) go from
                          > ER11 to ER32. The bigger the number, the bigger the capacity and stickout
                          > from the spindle.
                          >
                          > cheers,
                          > c
                          >
                          >
                          > Blog:
                          > http://coreyrenner.tumblr.com/
                          >
                          > YouTube Channel:
                          > http://www.youtube.com/user/vandal968
                          >
                          >
                          > On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM, Scott E Bosecker
                          > <sbosecker@...>wrote:
                          >
                          > > **
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Mar,
                          > >
                          > > I'm going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                          > >
                          > > HSM? Home Shop Milling?
                          > >
                          > > ER25 collets... These can be adapted – if that's the right word – to my
                          > > ER8 mill-drill?
                          > >
                          > > Best regards,
                          > >
                          > > Scott
                          > >
                          > > *From:* Mar <martik777@...>
                          > > *Sent:* Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                          > > *To:* mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                          > > *Subject:* [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                          > > http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm
                          > >
                          > > It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice
                          > > and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and
                          > > end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head.
                          > > CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a
                          > > full collet set.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Scott E Bosecker
                          ôto my ER8 mill-drill?ö Make that R8. My fingers are pretty small so I canÆt blame it on ôfat fingersö even though E & R are next to each other on the
                          Message 12 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                            “to my ER8 mill-drill?”
                             
                            Make that R8.  My fingers are pretty small so I can’t blame it on “fat fingers” even though E & R are next to each other on the keyboard.
                             
                            Scott
                             
                            Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 12:37 PM
                            Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                             
                             

                            Home Shop Machining/Machinist.
                             
                            ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out.  These machines are available with R8 or MT3 spindles.  The R8 variety are more common in the US, and the MT3 versions are more common in the UK.  If you go this route, there is a trade-off between the size of the ER collet system you choose, and how far it sticks out from the spindle.  ER's (that I've seen) go from ER11 to ER32.  The bigger the number, the bigger the capacity and stickout from the spindle.
                             
                            cheers,
                            c
                             


                            On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM, Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                             
                            Mar,
                             
                            I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                             
                            HSM?  Home Shop Milling?
                             
                            ER25 collets...  These can be adapted – if that’s the right word – to my ER8 mill-drill?
                             
                            Best regards,
                             
                            Scott
                             
                            From: Mar
                            Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                            Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                             
                             



                            Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                            http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                            It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.

                             
                          • Craig Johnston
                            ER collets come in a variety of  sizes.  The number after the ER is approximately the od of the collet; the max diameter that an ER40 will hold is 1 inch.
                            Message 13 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                              ER collets come in a variety of  sizes.  The number after the ER is approximately the od of the collet; the max diameter that an ER40 will hold is 1 inch.  In general they are more precise and hold better than R8 collets. I have a full set of er40 collets and use them both on my RF45 clone mill and 10x22 lathe.  So far the import set has proven to be accurate and well made.  Highly recommended!




                              Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone



                              -------- Original message --------
                              From: Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...>
                              Date: 08/12/2013 11:04 AM (GMT-08:00)
                              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group


                               

                              “to my ER8 mill-drill?”
                               
                              Make that R8.  My fingers are pretty small so I can’t blame it on “fat fingers” even though E & R are next to each other on the keyboard.
                               
                              Scott
                               
                              Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 12:37 PM
                              Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                               
                               

                              Home Shop Machining/Machinist.
                               
                              ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out.  These machines are available with R8 or MT3 spindles.  The R8 variety are more common in the US, and the MT3 versions are more common in the UK.  If you go this route, there is a trade-off between the size of the ER collet system you choose, and how far it sticks out from the spindle.  ER's (that I've seen) go from ER11 to ER32.  The bigger the number, the bigger the capacity and stickout from the spindle.
                               
                              cheers,
                              c
                               


                              On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM, Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                               
                              Mar,
                               
                              I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                               
                              HSM?  Home Shop Milling?
                               
                              ER25 collets...  These can be adapted – if that’s the right word – to my ER8 mill-drill?
                               
                              Best regards,
                               
                              Scott
                               
                              From: Mar
                              Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                              Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                               
                               



                              Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                              http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                              It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.

                               

                            • Scott E Bosecker
                              Forgive me if this is obvious to the other members of this group. After doing some research, my understanding of the ER25 system is a that it is a collet chuck
                              Message 14 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                                Forgive me if this is obvious to the other members of this group.
                                 
                                After doing some research, my understanding of the ER25 system is a that it is a collet chuck where the spindle matches the of the collet chuck is selected to match the taper of the machine using the chuck.  The individual collets are placed in the chuck.
                                 
                                Mar’s comment regarding not having to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders threw me for a while but – if I understand how the ER25 collet system works – this is because a ER25 collet set has enough gripping range to be used to hold drill bits instead of a drill chuck?
                                 
                                Am I on the right track?
                                 
                                Best regards,
                                 
                                Scott
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 12:37 PM
                                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                                 
                                 

                                Home Shop Machining/Machinist.
                                 
                                ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out.  These machines are available with R8 or MT3 spindles.  The R8 variety are more common in the US, and the MT3 versions are more common in the UK.  If you go this route, there is a trade-off between the size of the ER collet system you choose, and how far it sticks out from the spindle.  ER's (that I've seen) go from ER11 to ER32.  The bigger the number, the bigger the capacity and stickout from the spindle.
                                 
                                cheers,
                                c
                                 


                                On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM, Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                                 
                                Mar,
                                 
                                I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                                 
                                HSM?  Home Shop Milling?
                                 
                                ER25 collets...  These can be adapted – if that’s the right word – to my ER8 mill-drill?
                                 
                                Best regards,
                                 
                                Scott
                                 
                                From: Mar
                                Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                                Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                                 
                                 



                                Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                                http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                                It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.

                                 
                              • Scott E Bosecker
                                LetÆs try that again û I obviously shouldnÆt be trying to type while watching an Atlanta Braves game on TV. Forgive me if this is obvious to the other
                                Message 15 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                                  Let’s try that again – I obviously shouldn’t be trying to type while watching an Atlanta Braves game on TV.
                                   
                                  Forgive me if this is obvious to the other members of this group.
                                   
                                  After doing some research, my understanding of the ER25 system is that it is consists of a collet chuck where the spindle matches the taper of the machine using the chuck and the individual collets are placed in the chuck.
                                   
                                  Mar’s comment regarding not having to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders threw me for a while but – if I understand how the ER25 collet system works – this is because a ER25 collet set has enough gripping range to be used to hold drill bits instead of a drill chuck?
                                   
                                  Am I on the right track?
                                   
                                  Best regards,
                                   
                                  Scott
                                   
                                  Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 10:38 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                                   
                                   

                                  Forgive me if this is obvious to the other members of this group.
                                   
                                  After doing some research, my understanding of the ER25 system is a that it is a collet chuck where the spindle matches the of the collet chuck is selected to match the taper of the machine using the chuck.  The individual collets are placed in the chuck.
                                   
                                  Mar’s comment regarding not having to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders threw me for a while but – if I understand how the ER25 collet system works – this is because a ER25 collet set has enough gripping range to be used to hold drill bits instead of a drill chuck?
                                   
                                  Am I on the right track?
                                   
                                  Best regards,
                                   
                                  Scott
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 12:37 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                                   
                                   

                                  Home Shop Machining/Machinist.
                                   
                                  ER collet chucks are very handy as Mar points out.  These machines are available with R8 or MT3 spindles.  The R8 variety are more common in the US, and the MT3 versions are more common in the UK.  If you go this route, there is a trade-off between the size of the ER collet system you choose, and how far it sticks out from the spindle.  ER's (that I've seen) go from ER11 to ER32.  The bigger the number, the bigger the capacity and stickout from the spindle.
                                   
                                  cheers,
                                  c
                                   


                                  On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM, Scott E Bosecker <sbosecker@...> wrote:
                                   
                                  Mar,
                                   
                                  I’m going to reveal my ignorance, so please be gentle...
                                   
                                  HSM?  Home Shop Milling?
                                   
                                  ER25 collets...  These can be adapted – if that’s the right word – to my ER8 mill-drill?
                                   
                                  Best regards,
                                   
                                  Scott
                                   
                                  From: Mar
                                  Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:59 AM
                                  Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                                   
                                   



                                  Here's nice one (similar to Grizzly G1005z):
                                  http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/rong_fu_rf_25_mill.htm

                                  It's a good mill for HSM. Start with aluminum or even hardwood to practice and get an ER25 collet set so you don't have to swap the drill chuck and end mill holders - This will almost eliminate the need to raise the head. CTCtools has good deals on these, $17 for an MT3 collet chuck and $37 for a full collet set.

                                   
                                • CS Mo
                                  Yes, you can use an ER collet to hold a drill bit. However, a drill chuck is still faster/easier.. You can put a chuck on a straight arbor and hold that in an
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                                    Yes, you can use an ER collet to hold a drill bit. However, a drill chuck is still faster/easier..

                                    You can put a chuck on a straight arbor and hold that in an ER collet, which may, or may not, be a faster change for you than swapping out an R8/MT holder.

                                    --CS

                                    >Let's try that again - I obviously shouldn't be trying to type while
                                    >watching an Atlanta Braves game on TV.
                                    >
                                    >Forgive me if this is obvious to the other members of this group.
                                    >
                                    >After doing some research, my understanding of the ER25 system is that
                                    >it is consists of a collet chuck where the spindle matches the taper of
                                    >the machine using the chuck and the individual collets are placed in the
                                    >chuck.
                                    >
                                    >Mar's comment regarding not having to swap the drill chuck and end mill
                                    >holders threw me for a while but - if I understand how the ER25 collet
                                    >system works - this is because a ER25 collet set has enough gripping
                                    >range to be used to hold drill bits instead of a drill chuck?
                                    >
                                    >Am I on the right track?
                                    >
                                    >Best regards,
                                    >
                                    >Scott
                                  • Mar
                                    Yes a drill chuck is faster IF it is already mounted. It s a pain to switch from collets to chucks etc, because you have to loosen the drawbar, tap the holder
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Aug 12, 2013
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                                      Yes a drill chuck is faster IF it is already mounted. It's a pain to switch from collets to chucks etc, because you have to loosen the drawbar, tap the holder out of the spindle etc. So, if you are just doing one or two holes sizes, switching collets doesnt take any more time. The other issue, is, if you switch to a drill chuck you may have to raise the head and lose position. I think one solution may be to make some custom holders for common size drill and center bits that would fit into your most common collet size. probably 3/8".

                                      Best not to spend too much on tooling until you gain some experience and KNOW what you really need.

                                      That's why I mentioned the ER25's as they are a fraction of the cost of ER32 or ER40's. But if you have a lathe, you may want the larger size to use the collets on both machines.



                                      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "CS Mo" <cs@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Yes, you can use an ER collet to hold a drill bit. However, a drill chuck is still faster/easier..
                                      >
                                      > You can put a chuck on a straight arbor and hold that in an ER collet, which may, or may not, be a faster change for you than swapping out an R8/MT holder.
                                    • Scott E Bosecker
                                      Thanks to the members of this group for their patient responses to my questions. Best regards, Scott From: Mar Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 1:34 AM To:
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Aug 13, 2013
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                                        Thanks to the members of this group for their patient responses to my questions.
                                         
                                        Best regards,
                                         
                                        Scott
                                         
                                        From: Mar
                                        Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 1:34 AM
                                        Subject: [mill_drill] Re: New to Mill-Drills and to this group
                                         
                                         


                                        Yes a drill chuck is faster IF it is already mounted. It's a pain to switch from collets to chucks etc, because you have to loosen the drawbar, tap the holder out of the spindle etc. So, if you are just doing one or two holes sizes, switching collets doesnt take any more time. The other issue, is, if you switch to a drill chuck you may have to raise the head and lose position. I think one solution may be to make some custom holders for common size drill and center bits that would fit into your most common collet size. probably 3/8".

                                        Best not to spend too much on tooling until you gain some experience and KNOW what you really need.

                                        That's why I mentioned the ER25's as they are a fraction of the cost of ER32 or ER40's. But if you have a lathe, you may want the larger size to use the collets on both machines.

                                        --- In mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com, "CS Mo" <cs@...> wrote:

                                        >
                                        > Yes, you can use an ER collet to
                                        hold a drill bit. However, a drill chuck is still faster/easier..
                                        >
                                        > You can put a chuck on a straight arbor and hold that in an ER collet,
                                        which may, or may not, be a faster change for you than swapping out an R8/MT holder.

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