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Re: [mill_drill] Best way to remove small high spots from the table?

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  • philr_77378
    A few initial passes with the oilstone will help you see the high spots for your scraping. ________________________________ From: Jerome Kimberlin
    Message 1 of 41 , Jul 17, 2013
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      A few initial passes with the oilstone will help you see the high spots for your scraping.


      From: Jerome Kimberlin <kimberln@...>
      To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 3:12 PM
      Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Best way to remove small high spots from the table?

       
      On 7/17/2013 12:57 PM, d.seiter@... wrote:
      What's the best way to remove small high spots from the mill table (from nicks, etc) without removing good metal?  I looked through the archives last night and didn't find anything; maybe I gave up too soon.

      I use a regular carbide blade scraper.  You can also make a scraper from an old file.  Just don't push too hard and take off more than the part of the ding that is raised.  After that, I use an oilstone to be sure all is flat with the rest of the table.  Oilstones take off so little that you will stone forever unless you do a little scraping first.  If you make your own scraper from an old file you can choose the width of the file to suit the size of the dings you want to remove, thus limiting the width of the scrape.

      JerryK


    • Kevin
      ... If you make or buy a punch with a flat end, and just break the sharp corner, you can use it with a small hammer to gently ease some of the metal back to
      Message 41 of 41 , Jul 19, 2013
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        d.seiter@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > What's the best way to remove small high spots from the mill table (from
        > nicks, etc) without removing good metal? I looked through the archives
        > last night and didn't find anything; maybe I gave up too soon.

        If you make or buy a punch with a flat end, and just break the sharp
        corner, you can use it with a small hammer to gently ease some of the
        metal back to where it came from. Then use a scraper until whatever you
        have that is flat sits properly. This is a workshop expedient method
        and isn't a substitute for other methods.

        Kevin
        --
        Kevin, NW England, UK
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