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Re: Protecting an angle plate

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  • Paul
    I had a big problem with rust due to condensation in my unheated garage shop. The best thing I have found are the Boeshield products (and they are made here
    Message 1 of 41 , Jul 15, 2013
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      I had a big problem with rust due to condensation in my unheated garage shop. The best thing I have found are the "Boeshield" products (and they are made here in Michigan). They have a kit with the T-9 preventive and a rust remover that works well. I got mine from Sears but there are lots of places to purchase the produce and they have international distributors.

      Paul H.

      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Curt Wuollet <wideopen1@...> wrote:
      >
      > What you are seeing is a wax. WD40, LPS, and a number of others
      > including Boeshield, are wax based.
      > The wax is dissolved in some petroleum like mineral spirits, kerosene or
      > a combination so it can be sprayed or brushed on and will penetrate to
      > the metal. Once the vehicle evaporates you are left with a wax coating,
      > that's the preservative. Various formulas give thicker or thinner
      > coatings and different colors. The thickest coatings are used for auto
      > rustproofing, etc where the coating won't be disturbed the thinner
      > coatings have to be a harder wax to withstand handling. I have made
      > something similar by dissolving paraffin wax in gasoline or naptha to
      > keep tools and saw tables and the like from rusting in damp conditions.
      > The formula that gives the most perfect coating and the wax that lasts
      > the best will
      > be the best preservative. There are lots of variations and some are
      > better than others in certain situations. I think they all derive from
      > cosmolene developed for the military. Alox is another brand with a lot
      > of various formulations on the same theme.
      >
      >
      > Regards
      >
      > cww
      >
      >
      >
      > On 07/14/2013 06:09 PM, Ramdog wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm going to have to retract my initial statement about the WD-40. I
      > > have never had my tools home other than a couple of angle plates but
      > > never had a problem with humidity and WD. I'm retired now, have my
      > > tools at home, the humidity is up, and I just looked at my mill vise
      > > and I have the brown stains that is talked about. It looks like the WD
      > > separated some and rusted in between the areas of separation.
      > >
      > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      > > <mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com>, "KURT" <kurt.laughlin@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > --- "Malcolm" <mparkerlisberg@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I have just purchased a new 6" angle plate for my mill and I am
      > > looking for suggestions on how to protect the plate ground surfaces
      > > from rust and dings. I need something that will hold oil or grease to
      > > cover the surfaces, but is quickly removed and replaced when I need to
      > > use it.
      > > > > I had thought of a felt covered angled wooden open box covered in
      > > oil soaked felt. Any other suggestions welcome
      > > > ------------
      > > >
      > > > There are several made-for-the-purpose preservatives available. I
      > > suggest LPS 3. WD-40 and plain oils are not reliable preservatives,
      > > although they have some of those effects.
      > > >
      > > > I have kept mine in its original cardboard shipping box, which is
      > > roughly a triangular prism. If you can set it someplace and not let
      > > things drop on it, smash into it, or knock it on to the floor. A
      > > preserved part within that box ought to last many years. If you bounce
      > > it off the table and onto the concrete when installing it, well, it's
      > > not going to matter how much nice of a box it had been in.
      > > >
      > > > KL
      > > >
      > > > Please trim your replies.
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Kevin
      ... If you make or buy a punch with a flat end, and just break the sharp corner, you can use it with a small hammer to gently ease some of the metal back to
      Message 41 of 41 , Jul 19, 2013
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        d.seiter@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > What's the best way to remove small high spots from the mill table (from
        > nicks, etc) without removing good metal? I looked through the archives
        > last night and didn't find anything; maybe I gave up too soon.

        If you make or buy a punch with a flat end, and just break the sharp
        corner, you can use it with a small hammer to gently ease some of the
        metal back to where it came from. Then use a scraper until whatever you
        have that is flat sits properly. This is a workshop expedient method
        and isn't a substitute for other methods.

        Kevin
        --
        Kevin, NW England, UK
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