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Re: Protecting an angle plate

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  • KURT
    ... There are several made-for-the-purpose preservatives available. I suggest LPS 3. WD-40 and plain oils are not reliable preservatives, although they have
    Message 1 of 41 , Jul 14, 2013
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      --- "Malcolm" <mparkerlisberg@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have just purchased a new 6" angle plate for my mill and I am looking for suggestions on how to protect the plate ground surfaces from rust and dings. I need something that will hold oil or grease to cover the surfaces, but is quickly removed and replaced when I need to use it.
      > I had thought of a felt covered angled wooden open box covered in oil soaked felt. Any other suggestions welcome
      ------------

      There are several made-for-the-purpose preservatives available. I suggest LPS 3. WD-40 and plain oils are not reliable preservatives, although they have some of those effects.

      I have kept mine in its original cardboard shipping box, which is roughly a triangular prism. If you can set it someplace and not let things drop on it, smash into it, or knock it on to the floor. A preserved part within that box ought to last many years. If you bounce it off the table and onto the concrete when installing it, well, it's not going to matter how much nice of a box it had been in.

      KL

      Please trim your replies.
    • Kevin
      ... If you make or buy a punch with a flat end, and just break the sharp corner, you can use it with a small hammer to gently ease some of the metal back to
      Message 41 of 41 , Jul 19, 2013
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        d.seiter@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > What's the best way to remove small high spots from the mill table (from
        > nicks, etc) without removing good metal? I looked through the archives
        > last night and didn't find anything; maybe I gave up too soon.

        If you make or buy a punch with a flat end, and just break the sharp
        corner, you can use it with a small hammer to gently ease some of the
        metal back to where it came from. Then use a scraper until whatever you
        have that is flat sits properly. This is a workshop expedient method
        and isn't a substitute for other methods.

        Kevin
        --
        Kevin, NW England, UK
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