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Re: [mill_drill] double check your drawings!

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  • Curt Wuollet
    They still design with tubes, there are very few 50,000 watt IC s. Regards cww ... They still design with tubes, there are very few 50,000 watt IC s. Regards
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 26, 2013
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      They still design with tubes, there are very few 50,000 watt IC's.

      Regards

      cww


      On 06/25/2013 11:56 PM, MC Cason wrote:
       

      On 06/25/2013 11:24 PM, Vern wrote:
      > I had to do mine with a etch-a-sketch, a sharpie and a pie plate full
      > of ferric nitrate on a Bunsen burner. I had to build my ic's from
      > discrete devices, chicken toe nails and super glue... Then test it
      > all with a light bulb and a vacuum tube theremin. So there. ;)
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone
      >

      Sounds like me, when I was in college.

      Pencil and paper, rub-on pads, a Sharpie, and hot Ferric Chloride in
      a glass dish, ICs were already fairly cheap, 555's aplenty, as well as
      logic gates. I never got into vacuum tubes, they were pretty much
      history by then...

      Designing on a Etch-a-Sketch... HMM, I'll have to try that some
      time. It may freak out my eldest granddaughter though.

      --
      MC Cason
      Associate Developer - Eagle3D, Created by Matthias Weißer


    • urrossum@att.net
      ... And at the other end of the power spectrum, there are still some splinter areas that are enamored of tubes. I don t really get the tube hi-fi thing; it
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 27, 2013
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        > They still design with tubes, there are very few 50,000 watt IC's.

        And at the other end of the power spectrum, there are still some splinter areas that are enamored of tubes. I don't really "get" the tube hi-fi thing; it seems to me that anything other than precise, linear amplification (possibly with tone controls/equalization) is essentially distortion, regardless of how musical it may be.

        However, in the actual music production context, that distortion can be quite useful. Enough so, in fact, that I'm now designing a couple of "boutique" tube pre-amps for the guitar and harmonica markets. I've learned a lot about the way tubes work over the last few weeks, and although I could probably model with reasonable accuracy the distortion of a starved-plate class-A stage using a DSP, it's just a lot easier to use the real thing. There's of course a certain cachet to doing it this way as well, and for the quantities I'm looking at there's still enough new-old-stock to make small production runs viable.

        Don't get me started on the (non-)merits of "hand-wiring", though...
        ~~
        Mark Moulding
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