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odd way to describe threads

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  • Jerry Durand
    I was just looking for a particular pipe valve and found one offered by a bunch of people that looks right but their description of the thread size is odd
    Message 1 of 7 , May 5, 2013
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      I was just looking for a particular pipe valve and found one offered by
      a bunch of people that looks right but their description of the thread
      size is odd (this should be a NPT thread). The description says the
      male fitting is 16mm od and the female end is 15mm id. It took me a bit
      to figure out that apparently means 3/8" pipe thread.

      The worst part is how all the vendors cut and pasted the same
      description, must be only one manufacturer of this in China.

      I guess worst case I wind up making an adapter on my lathe.

      Buying a USA made valve is at least 10 times as much money. :(

      --
      Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com
      tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
      Skype: jerrydurand
    • Druid Noibn
      Hi,   It is also possible that your US sourced valve was made in China.   With China accounting for 40% of the world demand for copper and in some spurts,
      Message 2 of 7 , May 5, 2013
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        Hi,
         
        It is also possible that your US "sourced" valve was made in China.
         
        With China accounting for 40% of the world demand for copper and in some spurts, buying up to 70% of the metal - it is likely we are being sourced buy them.
         
        Kind regards,
        DBN

        --- On Sun, 5/5/13, Jerry Durand <jdurand@...> wrote:

        From: Jerry Durand <jdurand@...>
        Subject: [mill_drill] odd way to describe threads
        To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, 7x12minilathe@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, May 5, 2013, 2:23 PM

         
        I was just looking for a particular pipe valve and found one offered by
        a bunch of people that looks right but their description of the thread
        size is odd (this should be a NPT thread). The description says the
        male fitting is 16mm od and the female end is 15mm id. It took me a bit
        to figure out that apparently means 3/8" pipe thread.

        The worst part is how all the vendors cut and pasted the same
        description, must be only one manufacturer of this in China.

        I guess worst case I wind up making an adapter on my lathe.

        Buying a USA made valve is at least 10 times as much money. :(

        --
        Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com
        tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
        Skype: jerrydurand

      • Craig E. Johnston
        Re the pipe threads: some metric pipe threads are very close to NPT sizes – the coolant nipple on my RF-45 clone table was slightly different diameter than
        Message 3 of 7 , May 5, 2013
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          Re the pipe threads:  some metric pipe threads are very close to NPT sizes – the coolant nipple on my RF-45 clone table was slightly different diameter than 3/8” NPT, but the threads were almost the same.  Since the nipple was in the way of the x-axis glass scale, I turned a (metric threaded) plug to close it off and drilled and tapped a ¼ NPT hole in a better location.

           

          I have also had the experience of buying plumbing fittings in New Zealand to work with American NPT fittings on my boat, and found that they were almost  the same.  Up to about ½” I could mate them, but larger sizes simply didn’t go together.

           

          A wise old friend, who at the time was building his own 38’ sailboat, once commented that “plumbing really sucks…”

          Craig

           

          From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Druid Noibn
          Sent: Sunday, May 05, 2013 1:30 PM
          To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [mill_drill] odd way to describe threads

           

           

          Hi,

           

          It is also possible that your US "sourced" valve was made in China.

           

          With China accounting for 40% of the world demand for copper and in some spurts, buying up to 70% of the metal - it is likely we are being sourced buy them.

           

          Kind regards,

          DBN

          --- On Sun, 5/5/13, Jerry Durand <jdurand@...> wrote:


          From: Jerry Durand <jdurand@...>
          Subject: [mill_drill] odd way to describe threads
          To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, 7x12minilathe@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, May 5, 2013, 2:23 PM

           

          I was just looking for a particular pipe valve and found one offered by
          a bunch of people that looks right but their description of the thread
          size is odd (this should be a NPT thread). The description says the
          male fitting is 16mm od and the female end is 15mm id. It took me a bit
          to figure out that apparently means 3/8" pipe thread.

          The worst part is how all the vendors cut and pasted the same
          description, must be only one manufacturer of this in China.

          I guess worst case I wind up making an adapter on my lathe.

          Buying a USA made valve is at least 10 times as much money. :(

          --
          Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com
          tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
          Skype: jerrydurand

        • Jerry Durand
          ... My wife used to work in a steel shop (designer and fabricator). They once got in a shipment of steel from the EU and it was ALMOST the right inch size.
          Message 4 of 7 , May 5, 2013
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            On 05/05/2013 10:55 PM, Craig E. Johnston wrote:

            Re the pipe threads:  some metric pipe threads are very close to NPT sizes – the coolant nipple on my RF-45 clone table was slightly different diameter than 3/8” NPT, but the threads were almost the same.  Since the nipple was in the way of the x-axis glass scale, I turned a (metric threaded) plug to close it off and drilled and tapped a ¼ NPT hole in a better location.

             

            I have also had the experience of buying plumbing fittings in New Zealand to work with American NPT fittings on my boat, and found that they were almost  the same.  Up to about ½” I could mate them, but larger sizes simply didn’t go together.

             

            A wise old friend, who at the time was building his own 38’ sailboat, once commented that “plumbing really sucks…”

            Craig

             


            My wife used to work in a steel shop (designer and fabricator).  They once got in a shipment of steel from the EU and it was ALMOST the right inch size.  It was off just enough that it would jamb the shear in the hydraulic iron worker.  So that entire load had to be cut on the band saw.


            -- 
            Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc.  www.interstellar.com
            tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
            Skype:  jerrydurand
          • Jerry Durand
            I ordered one of the Chinese valves, I ll try to remember to post a note if it really is 3/8 NPT when it gets here. Otherwise I ll be making an adapter. :)
            Message 5 of 7 , May 5, 2013
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              I ordered one of the Chinese valves, I'll try to remember to post a note
              if it really is 3/8 NPT when it gets here. Otherwise I'll be making an
              adapter. :)

              --
              Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com
              tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
              Skype: jerrydurand
            • Druid Noibn
              Hi,   I recall working on a 316L stainless steel bioreactor where the threaded port was 11 TPI - the NPT used 1 1/2 TPI and the probe would not fit.  The
              Message 6 of 7 , May 6, 2013
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                Hi,
                 
                I recall working on a 316L stainless steel bioreactor where the threaded port was 11 TPI - the NPT used 1 1/2 TPI and the probe would not fit.  The port is referred to as a 25mm port (ID size).  As the system was steam sterilized steam and needed to have high containment (bacteria are small), a good fit was important.
                 
                Off to a local plumbing shop to rent a die, wrench and cutting oil to re-thread six ports.  The 1/2 TPI difference wasn't structural and it was common practice to run both threads so that the clients could use either the NPT or BSP probes.
                 
                Be well,
                DBN    
                 


                --- On Mon, 5/6/13, Jerry Durand <jdurand@...> wrote:

                From: Jerry Durand <jdurand@...>
                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] odd way to describe threads
                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, May 6, 2013, 2:19 AM

                 

                On 05/05/2013 10:55 PM, Craig E. Johnston wrote:

                Re the pipe threads:  some metric pipe threads are very close to NPT sizes – the coolant nipple on my RF-45 clone table was slightly different diameter than 3/8” NPT, but the threads were almost the same.  Since the nipple was in the way of the x-axis glass scale, I turned a (metric threaded) plug to close it off and drilled and tapped a ¼ NPT hole in a better location.

                 

                I have also had the experience of buying plumbing fittings in New Zealand to work with American NPT fittings on my boat, and found that they were almost  the same.  Up to about ½” I could mate them, but larger sizes simply didn’t go together.

                 

                A wise old friend, who at the time was building his own 38’ sailboat, once commented that “plumbing really sucks…”

                Craig

                 


                My wife used to work in a steel shop (designer and fabricator).  They once got in a shipment of steel from the EU and it was ALMOST the right inch size.  It was off just enough that it would jamb the shear in the hydraulic iron worker.  So that entire load had to be cut on the band saw.


                -- 
                Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc.  www.interstellar.com
                tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
                Skype:  jerrydurand
              • Curt Wuollet
                If it s close, a little thread chasing should get you enough engagement. After all, the purpose of pipe threads is to jam. This makes it a lot easier than if
                Message 7 of 7 , May 6, 2013
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                  If it's close, a little thread chasing should get you enough engagement.
                  After all, the purpose of pipe threads is to jam.
                  This makes it a lot easier than if they were to fit over several
                  diameters length. With the crazy specifications used in plumbing, it's
                  amazing how well parts interchange and fit.

                  Regards

                  cww

                  Jerry Durand wrote:
                  >
                  > I ordered one of the Chinese valves, I'll try to remember to post a note
                  > if it really is 3/8 NPT when it gets here. Otherwise I'll be making an
                  > adapter. :)
                  >
                  > --
                  > Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com
                  > tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
                  > Skype: jerrydurand
                  >
                  >
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