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Re: For some of you that collect

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  • John Herrmann
    ... There s a close equivalent used for
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 30, 2013
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      "Guenther P":
      >
      <http://www.ebay.com/itm/1873-Print-Spiral-Cutter-Vintage-Machine-Brainard-Milling-Hyde-Park-MA-Antique-/370804145175>


      There's a close equivalent used for woodworking. It's called a "legacy mill." I've had occasion to repair/improve one for some woodworker friends a couple of years ago. The machine is basically a long bed with head and tail stocks and a set of slide rods for a router. The router's "x" motion is coordinated to rotation of the spindle, so you can cut spirals, etc.
      <http://legacywoodworking.com/ornamentalMilling.cfm>

      My friends had the model 900 (msrp ~$1500), which may not be available any more.
      <http://legacywoodworking.com/modelcomparison.cfm>

      The only current model I could find was the "Evolution (~$3000).
      <http://legacywoodworking.com/products.cfm?product=306>


      - John Herrmann
    • Edgar
      John, you can do the same thing on a mill if you have a universal dividing head (it s always the really expensive one with a set of change gears and provision
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 30, 2013
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        John, you can do the same thing on a mill if you have a universal dividing head (it's always the really expensive one with a set of change gears and provision to gear it to the mill's "x" axis.

        The rub is if this is all you have, you are limited in trying to cut a spiral gear. If you try to make one in a RF mill you will have to have an end mill with the flutes ground to an involute curve profile on the side. This will not be a cheap cutter and resharpening it will not be a straightforward task.

        If you have a vertical mill on which the head can swing side to side you can then use a standard involute cutter. The drawback here is that you have a large cutter hanging out on a quill with support on only on one side.

        So if you want to cut spiral gears you really need a horizontal mill (or a horizontal milling attachment for your vertical mill), A universal dividing head w/ gear train (or a CNC control for the dividing head), and most importantly (and hardest to find) a mill that has a universal table (i.e. it can be swung side to side on its mount on the Y axis saddle). Note that CNC control of the X and Y axis won't eliminate the need for being able to swing the X axis so that the involute cutter is presented "square" to the spiral being cut and generate the correct tooth profile.

        All this is the reason the Brainard attachment is so clever. If the base flange of the Brainard attachement was mounted on a wedge plate of the correct angle, you could then cut a correct spiral gear on a RF mill (where the RF's X and Z axis were locked and the cutter depth set by feeding the Y axis).

        Orlin in SC/USA

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "John Herrmann" <hman_mit@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > "Guenther P":
        > >
        > <http://www.ebay.com/itm/1873-Print-Spiral-Cutter-Vintage-Machine-Brainard-Milling-Hyde-Park-MA-Antique-/370804145175>
        >
        >
        > There's a close equivalent used for woodworking. It's called a "legacy mill." I've had occasion to repair/improve one for some woodworker friends a couple of years ago. The machine is basically a long bed with head and tail stocks and a set of slide rods for a router. The router's "x" motion is coordinated to rotation of the spindle, so you can cut spirals, etc.
        > <http://legacywoodworking.com/ornamentalMilling.cfm>
        >
        > My friends had the model 900 (msrp ~$1500), which may not be available any more.
        > <http://legacywoodworking.com/modelcomparison.cfm>
        >
        > The only current model I could find was the "Evolution (~$3000).
        > <http://legacywoodworking.com/products.cfm?product=306>
        >
        >
        > - John Herrmann
        >
      • Guenther Paul
        I would call that a router lathe. I belong to a forum where several member have shop made router lathesGP ________________________________ From: John Herrmann
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 30, 2013
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          I would call that a router lathe. I belong to a forum where several member have shop made router lathes
          GP



          From: John Herrmann <hman_mit@...>
          To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, April 30, 2013 6:15:28 PM
          Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect

           



          "Guenther P":

          >
          <http://www.ebay.com/itm/1873-Print-Spiral-Cutter-Vintage-Machine-Brainard-Milling-Hyde-Park-MA-Antique-/370804145175>

          There's a close equivalent used for woodworking. It's called a "legacy mill." I've had occasion to repair/improve one for some woodworker friends a couple of years ago. The machine is basically a long bed with head and tail stocks and a set of slide rods for a router. The router's "x" motion is coordinated to rotation of the spindle, so you can cut spirals, etc.
          <http://legacywoodworking.com/ornamentalMilling.cfm>

          My friends had the model 900 (msrp ~$1500), which may not be available any more.
          <http://legacywoodworking.com/modelcomparison.cfm>

          The only current model I could find was the "Evolution (~$3000).
          <http://legacywoodworking.com/products.cfm?product=306>

          - John Herrmann

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