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Re: For some of you that collect

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  • Edgar
    Here is a link to the 1916 Machinery magazine article on the Yeomans lathe. I was wrong on the build time. The article says a crew assembled a lathe in 6
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 25, 2013
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      Here is a link to the 1916 "Machinery" magazine article on the Yeomans lathe. I was wrong on the build time. The article says a crew assembled a lathe in 6 hours and 15 minutes. These are apparently the only photos existing for one of these lathes.

      http://www.flowxrg.com.php5-19.dfw1-2.websitetestlink.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/new-method-of-building-lathes.pdf

      Orlin in SC/USA

      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Edgar" <aceroadholder@...> wrote:
      >
      > W, then it might be better to follow the directions given carefully including how to properly cure it. The casting is actually only 1/10 of a cubic foot. Even if scaled up slightly, there isn't a huge volume of concrete. If cured as directed, cracking of the cement may not be much of a problem.
      > I understand that the Yeomans lathes had problems cracking after several years of curing out... but they were large castings of 4-6 tons. They sufficed for emergency war production. A five man crew could build a large lathe from bare concrete casting to finished machine in 14 hours, whereas one built of cast iron would take months to construct from raw cast iron to finished machine.
      >
      > Orlin in SC/USA
      >
      > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy <william@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Polymer concrete, I determined, ain't cheap. It's also a somewhat mysterious
      > > material to work with, as making it perfect requires a really solid
      > > understanding of how mixed aggregates self-assemble. The trick to good P-C is
      > > having the right combination of grain sizes of sifted/sorted sands and gravels,
      > > fully and completely wetted with the right amount of resin and hardener (with
      > > the right thixotropy and exothermicity...). It can get expensive and complex
      > > really quickly. You may also need a shaker of some sort to get bubbles out of
      > > the material before it sets.
      >
    • Druid Noibn
      Hi,   Excellent - Thanks!   Be well, DBN ... From: Edgar Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect To:
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 26, 2013
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        Hi,
         
        Excellent - Thanks!
         
        Be well,
        DBN

        --- On Fri, 4/26/13, Edgar <aceroadholder@...> wrote:

        From: Edgar <aceroadholder@...>
        Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect
        To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, April 26, 2013, 12:28 AM

         
        Here is a link to the 1916 "Machinery" magazine article on the Yeomans lathe. I was wrong on the build time. The article says a crew assembled a lathe in 6 hours and 15 minutes. These are apparently the only photos existing for one of these lathes.

        http://www.flowxrg.com.php5-19.dfw1-2.websitetestlink.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/new-method-of-building-lathes.pdf

        Orlin in SC/USA

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Edgar" <aceroadholder@...> wrote:
        >
        > W, then it might be better to follow the directions given carefully including how to properly cure it. The casting is actually only 1/10 of a cubic foot. Even if scaled up slightly, there isn't a huge volume of concrete. If cured as directed, cracking of the cement may not be much of a problem.
        > I understand that the Yeomans lathes had problems cracking after several years of curing out... but they were large castings of 4-6 tons. They sufficed for emergency war production. A five man crew could build a large lathe from bare concrete casting to finished machine in 14 hours, whereas one built of cast iron would take months to construct from raw cast iron to finished machine.
        >
        > Orlin in SC/USA
        >
        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy <william@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Polymer concrete, I determined, ain't cheap. It's also a somewhat mysterious
        > > material to work with, as making it perfect requires a really solid
        > > understanding of how mixed aggregates self-assemble. The trick to good P-C is
        > > having the right combination of grain sizes of sifted/sorted sands and gravels,
        > > fully and completely wetted with the right amount of resin and hardener (with
        > > the right thixotropy and exothermicity...). It can get expensive and complex
        > > really quickly. You may also need a shaker of some sort to get bubbles out of
        > > the material before it sets.
        >

      • Darren M
        You might also enjoy this later article which shows excelent detail of one of their lathes from 1918
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 26, 2013
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           You might also enjoy this later article which shows excelent detail of one of their lathes from 1918 Machinery magazine





          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Druid Noibn wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          >  
          > Excellent - Thanks!
          >  
          > Be well,
          > DBN
          >
          > --- On Fri, 4/26/13, Edgar aceroadholder@... wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: Edgar aceroadholder@...
          > Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect
          > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Friday, April 26, 2013, 12:28 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          >
          > Here is a link to the 1916 "Machinery" magazine article on the Yeomans lathe. I was wrong on the build time. The article says a crew assembled a lathe in 6 hours and 15 minutes. These are apparently the only photos existing for one of these lathes.
          >
          > http://www.flowxrg.com.php5-19.dfw1-2.websitetestlink.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/new-method-of-building-lathes.pdf
          >
          > Orlin in SC/USA
          >
          > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Edgar" aceroadholder@ wrote:
          > >
          > > W, then it might be better to follow the directions given carefully including how to properly cure it. The casting is actually only 1/10 of a cubic foot. Even if scaled up slightly, there isn't a huge volume of concrete. If cured as directed, cracking of the cement may not be much of a problem.
          > > I understand that the Yeomans lathes had problems cracking after several years of curing out... but they were large castings of 4-6 tons. They sufficed for emergency war production. A five man crew could build a large lathe from bare concrete casting to finished machine in 14 hours, whereas one built of cast iron would take months to construct from raw cast iron to finished machine.
          > >
          > > Orlin in SC/USA
          > >
          > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Polymer concrete, I determined, ain't cheap. It's also a somewhat mysterious
          > > > material to work with, as making it perfect requires a really solid
          > > > understanding of how mixed aggregates self-assemble. The trick to good P-C is
          > > > having the right combination of grain sizes of sifted/sorted sands and gravels,
          > > > fully and completely wetted with the right amount of resin and hardener (with
          > > > the right thixotropy and exothermicity...). It can get expensive and complex
          > > > really quickly. You may also need a shaker of some sort to get bubbles out of
          > > > the material before it sets.
          > >
          >
        • Edgar
          Thank you for finding this article. I had not seen it before. You have to admit this is pretty clever stuff to be nearly 100 years old. Orlin in SC/USA
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 26, 2013
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            Thank you for finding this article. I had not seen it before. You have to admit this is pretty clever stuff to be nearly 100 years old.

            Orlin in SC/USA

            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Darren M" <ram50v8efi@...> wrote:
            >
            > You might also enjoy this later article which shows excelent detail of
            > one of their lathes from 1918
            > <http://books.google.com/books?id=xp0fAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA261&lpg=PA261&dq=ama\
            > lgamated+machinery+corporation&source=bl&ots=PuzsioCpSQ&sig=o8yc1esYa9U0\
            > WhMsyedKe86evxM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2Kd6UYndAsXt2QXby4GICQ&ved=0CGQQ6AEwCQ>
            > Machinery magazine
          • Druid Noibn
            Hi,   Very nice - thanks!   Be well, DBN ... From: Darren M Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect To:
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 26, 2013
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              Hi,
               
              Very nice - thanks!
               
              Be well,
              DBN

              --- On Fri, 4/26/13, Darren M <ram50v8efi@...> wrote:

              From: Darren M <ram50v8efi@...>
              Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect
              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, April 26, 2013, 1:13 PM

               
               You might also enjoy this later article which shows excelent detail of one of their lathes from 1918 Machinery magazine





              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Druid Noibn wrote:
              >
              > Hi,
              >  
              > Excellent - Thanks!
              >  
              > Be well,
              > DBN
              >
              > --- On Fri, 4/26/13, Edgar aceroadholder@... wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: Edgar aceroadholder@...
              > Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect
              > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Friday, April 26, 2013, 12:28 AM
              >
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              >
              > Here is a link to the 1916 "Machinery" magazine article on the Yeomans lathe. I was wrong on the build time. The article says a crew assembled a lathe in 6 hours and 15 minutes. These are apparently the only photos existing for one of these lathes.
              >
              > http://www.flowxrg.com.php5-19.dfw1-2.websitetestlink.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/new-method-of-building-lathes.pdf
              >
              > Orlin in SC/USA
              >
              > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Edgar" aceroadholder@ wrote:
              > >
              > > W, then it might be better to follow the directions given carefully including how to properly cure it. The casting is actually only 1/10 of a cubic foot. Even if scaled up slightly, there isn't a huge volume of concrete. If cured as directed, cracking of the cement may not be much of a problem.
              > > I understand that the Yeomans lathes had problems cracking after several years of curing out... but they were large castings of 4-6 tons. They sufficed for emergency war production. A five man crew could build a large lathe from bare concrete casting to finished machine in 14 hours, whereas one built of cast iron would take months to construct from raw cast iron to finished machine.
              > >
              > > Orlin in SC/USA
              > >
              > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Polymer concrete, I determined, ain't cheap. It's also a somewhat mysterious
              > > > material to work with, as making it perfect requires a really solid
              > > > understanding of how mixed aggregates self-assemble. The trick to good P-C is
              > > > having the right combination of grain sizes of sifted/sorted sands and gravels,
              > > > fully and completely wetted with the right amount of resin and hardener (with
              > > > the right thixotropy and exothermicity...). It can get expensive and complex
              > > > really quickly. You may also need a shaker of some sort to get bubbles out of
              > > > the material before it sets.
              > >
              >
            • John Herrmann
              ... There s a close equivalent used for
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 30, 2013
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                "Guenther P":
                >
                <http://www.ebay.com/itm/1873-Print-Spiral-Cutter-Vintage-Machine-Brainard-Milling-Hyde-Park-MA-Antique-/370804145175>


                There's a close equivalent used for woodworking. It's called a "legacy mill." I've had occasion to repair/improve one for some woodworker friends a couple of years ago. The machine is basically a long bed with head and tail stocks and a set of slide rods for a router. The router's "x" motion is coordinated to rotation of the spindle, so you can cut spirals, etc.
                <http://legacywoodworking.com/ornamentalMilling.cfm>

                My friends had the model 900 (msrp ~$1500), which may not be available any more.
                <http://legacywoodworking.com/modelcomparison.cfm>

                The only current model I could find was the "Evolution (~$3000).
                <http://legacywoodworking.com/products.cfm?product=306>


                - John Herrmann
              • Edgar
                John, you can do the same thing on a mill if you have a universal dividing head (it s always the really expensive one with a set of change gears and provision
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 30, 2013
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                  John, you can do the same thing on a mill if you have a universal dividing head (it's always the really expensive one with a set of change gears and provision to gear it to the mill's "x" axis.

                  The rub is if this is all you have, you are limited in trying to cut a spiral gear. If you try to make one in a RF mill you will have to have an end mill with the flutes ground to an involute curve profile on the side. This will not be a cheap cutter and resharpening it will not be a straightforward task.

                  If you have a vertical mill on which the head can swing side to side you can then use a standard involute cutter. The drawback here is that you have a large cutter hanging out on a quill with support on only on one side.

                  So if you want to cut spiral gears you really need a horizontal mill (or a horizontal milling attachment for your vertical mill), A universal dividing head w/ gear train (or a CNC control for the dividing head), and most importantly (and hardest to find) a mill that has a universal table (i.e. it can be swung side to side on its mount on the Y axis saddle). Note that CNC control of the X and Y axis won't eliminate the need for being able to swing the X axis so that the involute cutter is presented "square" to the spiral being cut and generate the correct tooth profile.

                  All this is the reason the Brainard attachment is so clever. If the base flange of the Brainard attachement was mounted on a wedge plate of the correct angle, you could then cut a correct spiral gear on a RF mill (where the RF's X and Z axis were locked and the cutter depth set by feeding the Y axis).

                  Orlin in SC/USA

                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "John Herrmann" <hman_mit@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > "Guenther P":
                  > >
                  > <http://www.ebay.com/itm/1873-Print-Spiral-Cutter-Vintage-Machine-Brainard-Milling-Hyde-Park-MA-Antique-/370804145175>
                  >
                  >
                  > There's a close equivalent used for woodworking. It's called a "legacy mill." I've had occasion to repair/improve one for some woodworker friends a couple of years ago. The machine is basically a long bed with head and tail stocks and a set of slide rods for a router. The router's "x" motion is coordinated to rotation of the spindle, so you can cut spirals, etc.
                  > <http://legacywoodworking.com/ornamentalMilling.cfm>
                  >
                  > My friends had the model 900 (msrp ~$1500), which may not be available any more.
                  > <http://legacywoodworking.com/modelcomparison.cfm>
                  >
                  > The only current model I could find was the "Evolution (~$3000).
                  > <http://legacywoodworking.com/products.cfm?product=306>
                  >
                  >
                  > - John Herrmann
                  >
                • Guenther Paul
                  I would call that a router lathe. I belong to a forum where several member have shop made router lathesGP ________________________________ From: John Herrmann
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 30, 2013
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                    I would call that a router lathe. I belong to a forum where several member have shop made router lathes
                    GP



                    From: John Herrmann <hman_mit@...>
                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, April 30, 2013 6:15:28 PM
                    Subject: [mill_drill] Re: For some of you that collect

                     



                    "Guenther P":

                    >
                    <http://www.ebay.com/itm/1873-Print-Spiral-Cutter-Vintage-Machine-Brainard-Milling-Hyde-Park-MA-Antique-/370804145175>

                    There's a close equivalent used for woodworking. It's called a "legacy mill." I've had occasion to repair/improve one for some woodworker friends a couple of years ago. The machine is basically a long bed with head and tail stocks and a set of slide rods for a router. The router's "x" motion is coordinated to rotation of the spindle, so you can cut spirals, etc.
                    <http://legacywoodworking.com/ornamentalMilling.cfm>

                    My friends had the model 900 (msrp ~$1500), which may not be available any more.
                    <http://legacywoodworking.com/modelcomparison.cfm>

                    The only current model I could find was the "Evolution (~$3000).
                    <http://legacywoodworking.com/products.cfm?product=306>

                    - John Herrmann

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