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Re: [mill_drill] hardening schedule

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  • Jerry Durand
    ... 400 for 15 minutes, 350 for 45. Probably close enough. -- Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 7, 2013
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      On 03/07/2013 08:16 PM, Jerome Kimberlin wrote:
      > The tool is a business expense and the excess heat can be used for the
      > pie. Make sure the pie can be baked at 400 deg F for an hour (or less)
      > since that is what it takes to get drill rod to RC 62.

      400 for 15 minutes, 350 for 45. Probably close enough.

      --
      Jerry Durand, Durand Interstellar, Inc. www.interstellar.com
      tel: +1 408 356-3886, USA toll free: 1 866 356-3886
      Skype: jerrydurand
    • Stan Stocker
      Hi Jerry, Just polish it up and gently heat well back from the business end. Go slowly, the surface oxide colors will start to run towards the end. When you
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 8, 2013
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        Hi Jerry,

        Just polish it up and gently heat well back from the business end. Go
        slowly, the surface oxide colors will start to run towards the end.
        When you hit a light or pale yellow/straw you can quench, or if you have
        been really gentle just let it cool.

        This assumes O-1 ow W-1 drill rod. If you're using A2 you may not need
        to temper if you let it air cool.

        A cheap toaster oven can be a handy thing in the shop, makes these sorts
        of things simple, along with shrink fitting stuff and heating up a quick
        lunch :-)

        If you do lots of this stuff, a very small shop furnace can be made with
        a few firebricks and a propane torch. The firebrick lines chamber if
        fairly small allows a more even heat.

        Take care,
        Stan

        On 03/07/2013 11:00 PM, Jerry Durand wrote:
        > I need to make a custom lathe tool out of some drill rod. That's no
        > problem, the mill will handle that. But it needs to be hardened and
        > stress relieved. So, hardening is no problem, but it's a waste to heat
        > the oven up to stress relieve it. So, I have it scheduled to line up
        > with the next time my wife makes a pie.
        >
        > I wonder if that makes the pie a business expense as it's helping to
        > make a tool for a customer's job.
        >
      • Guenther Paul
        Do it just like i tell you and your hardening process will work If you want the drill rod just a little harder heat it to a dark cherry read and drop it in
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 8, 2013
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          Do it just like i tell you and your hardening process will work
          If you want the drill rod just a little harder heat it to a dark cherry read and drop it in oil
          The liter the red is the harder the rod will be. Use oil hardening dill rod ok. Forget the annealing. If you want the rod a certain hardness you need to take it to a heat treating company
           
          GP



          From: Stan Stocker <skstocker@...>
          To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, March 8, 2013 11:30:28 AM
          Subject: Re: [mill_drill] hardening schedule

           

          Hi Jerry,

          Just polish it up and gently heat well back from the business end. Go
          slowly, the surface oxide colors will start to run towards the end.
          When you hit a light or pale yellow/straw you can quench, or if you have
          been really gentle just let it cool.

          This assumes O-1 ow W-1 drill rod. If you're using A2 you may not need
          to temper if you let it air cool.

          A cheap toaster oven can be a handy thing in the shop, makes these sorts
          of things simple, along with shrink fitting stuff and heating up a quick
          lunch :-)

          If you do lots of this stuff, a very small shop furnace can be made with
          a few firebricks and a propane torch. The firebrick lines chamber if
          fairly small allows a more even heat.

          Take care,
          Stan

          On 03/07/2013 11:00 PM, Jerry Durand wrote:
          > I need to make a custom lathe tool out of some drill rod. That's no
          > problem, the mill will handle that. But it needs to be hardened and
          > stress relieved. So, hardening is no problem, but it's a waste to heat
          > the oven up to stress relieve it. So, I have it scheduled to line up
          > with the next time my wife makes a pie.
          >
          > I wonder if that makes the pie a business expense as it's helping to
          > make a tool for a customer's job.
          >

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