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new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

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  • Rick Sparber
    At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z
    Message 1 of 18 , Jan 13, 2013
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      At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.

       

      If you are interested, please see

       

      http://rick.sparber.org/sawsem.pdf

       

      Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

       

      For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.

       

      Rick

    • philr_77378
      Rick, Nice tip.  Definitely worth a try .  It looks like a better method than my 0.003 thick piece of paper between the tool and the part.  It is very easy
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 13, 2013
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        Rick,
        Nice tip.  Definitely worth a try .  It looks like a better method than my 0.003 thick piece of paper between the tool and the part.  It is very easy to make a mistake and overshoot when using incremental jog down toward the part. Especially if you hurry and use an increment that exceeds the distance between your tool tip and the part.  If a person is diligent when using an end mill in a Welden type setscrew holder, the end mill is biased so the setscrew opposes the end mill from pulling out of the holder. Besides preventing damage to the tool this method helps accuracy because the tool cannot get pushed up into the holder .xyy" if it touches the part too much.  Thanks for sharing the tip.
        Phil R


        From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
        To: valleymetal@yahoogroups.com; mill_drill@yahoogroups.com; 3_in_1_Lathe_Mill_Drill@yahoogroups.com; smithy-machines@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 9:11 PM
        Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

         
        At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.
         
        If you are interested, please see
         
         
        Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.
         
        For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.
         
        Rick


      • Roger Blair
        I discovered a few years ago when I first tried that, the technique doesn t account for Z axis backlash... Regards, Roger ... From: Rick Sparber
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 13, 2013
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          I discovered a few years ago when I first tried that, the technique doesn't account for Z axis backlash...
          Regards,
          Roger
           
          ------ Original Message ------
          From: "Rick Sparber" <rgsparber@...>
          Sent: 1/13/2013 7:11:38 PM
          Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
           

          At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.

           

          If you are interested, please see

           

          http://rick.sparber.org/sawsem.pdf

           

          Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

           

          For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.

           

          Rick

        • Rick Sparber
          I don t think the CNC mills at this company have significant backlash. Rick
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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            I don't think the CNC mills at this company have significant backlash. 

            Rick

            On Jan 13, 2013, at 11:55 PM, "Roger Blair" <Roger.Blair@...> wrote:

            I discovered a few years ago when I first tried that, the technique doesn't account for Z axis backlash...
            Regards,
            Roger
             
            ------ Original Message ------
            From: "Rick Sparber" <rgsparber@...>
            Sent: 1/13/2013 7:11:38 PM
            Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
             

            At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.

             

            If you are interested, please see

             

            http://rick.sparber.org/sawsem.pdf

             

            Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

             

            For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.

             

            Rick

          • philr_77378
            Gravity works in favor of this method, if used on a vertical mill.  Maybe not in the case of traveling quill. Phil R ________________________________ From:
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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              Gravity works in favor of this method, if used on a vertical mill.  Maybe not in the case of traveling quill.
              Phil R

              From: Roger Blair <Roger.Blair@...>
              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 12:55 AM
              Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

               
              I discovered a few years ago when I first tried that, the technique doesn't account for Z axis backlash...
              Regards,
              Roger
               
              ------ Original Message ------
              From: "Rick Sparber" <rgsparber@...>
              Sent: 1/13/2013 7:11:38 PM
              Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
               
              At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.
               
              If you are interested, please see
               
               
              Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.
               
              For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.
               
              Rick


            • Rick Sparber
              One thing to keep in mind is that if you have a manual vertical mill and are reasonably careful, you can touch the cutter down on a hardened surface and do no
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                One thing to keep in mind is that if you have a manual vertical mill and are reasonably careful, you can touch the cutter down on a hardened surface and do no damage.

                 

                Rick

                 

                From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 1:29 AM
                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                 




                Gravity works in favor of this method, if used on a vertical mill.  Maybe not in the case of traveling quill.

                Phil R


                From: Roger Blair <Roger.Blair@...>
                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 12:55 AM
                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                 

                 

                I discovered a few years ago when I first tried that, the technique doesn't account for Z axis backlash...

                Regards,

                Roger

                 

                ------ Original Message ------

                From: "Rick Sparber" <rgsparber@...>

                Sent: 1/13/2013 7:11:38 PM

                Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                 

                At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.

                 

                If you are interested, please see

                 

                 

                Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

                 

                For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.

                 

                Rick

                 




              • philr_77378
                Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I ll stick to my piece of
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                  Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I'll stick to my piece of paper on the manual mill.  Been using that for years, but I recently acquired my first CNC, and touch off is kind of awkward for me right now.  I grabbed a 0.1875 Dowel pin and tried out your suggestion.  I picked up the surface location easier than before.  I hope to eventually have the more commonly used tools preset.   Thanks for the tip.
                  Phil R


                  From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                  To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 6:51 AM
                  Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                   
                  One thing to keep in mind is that if you have a manual vertical mill and are reasonably careful, you can touch the cutter down on a hardened surface and do no damage.
                   
                  Rick
                   
                  From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                  Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 1:29 AM
                  To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                   



                  Gravity works in favor of this method, if used on a vertical mill.  Maybe not in the case of traveling quill.
                  Phil R

                  From: Roger Blair <Roger.Blair@...>
                  To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 12:55 AM
                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                   
                   
                  I discovered a few years ago when I first tried that, the technique doesn't account for Z axis backlash...
                  Regards,
                  Roger
                   
                  ------ Original Message ------
                  From: "Rick Sparber" <rgsparber@...>
                  Sent: 1/13/2013 7:11:38 PM
                  Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                   
                  At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.
                   
                  If you are interested, please see
                   
                   
                  Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.
                   
                  For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.
                   
                  Rick
                   





                • Rick Sparber
                  Using the jog function to lower a cutter on a CNC mill is rather interesting. You are going an extremely tiny distance with a lot of force. It still boils down
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                    Using the jog function to lower a cutter on a CNC mill is rather interesting. You are going an extremely tiny distance with a lot of force. It still boils down to not being able to occupy a single space with two objects.

                     

                    I used to use paper to set my manual mill. Now I use my EEF. Faster and more accurate.

                     

                    Rick

                     

                    From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                    Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 6:18 AM
                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                     




                    Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I'll stick to my piece of paper on the manual mill.  Been using that for years, but I recently acquired my first CNC, and touch off is kind of awkward for me right now.  I grabbed a 0.1875 Dowel pin and tried out your suggestion.  I picked up the surface location easier than before.  I hope to eventually have the more commonly used tools preset.   Thanks for the tip.

                    Phil R

                     

                  • Rick Sparber
                    Phil, “All of us are smarter than any one of us.” By sharing information, we all get smarter. Rick From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                      Phil,

                       

                      “All of us are smarter than any one of us.” By sharing information, we all get smarter.

                       

                      Rick

                       

                      From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                      Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 10:50 PM
                      To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                       




                      Rick,

                      Nice tip.  Definitely worth a try .  It looks like a better method than my 0.003 thick piece of paper between the tool and the part.  It is very easy to make a mistake and overshoot when using incremental jog down toward the part. Especially if you hurry and use an increment that exceeds the distance between your tool tip and the part.  If a person is diligent when using an end mill in a Welden type setscrew holder, the end mill is biased so the setscrew opposes the end mill from pulling out of the holder. Besides preventing damage to the tool this method helps accuracy because the tool cannot get pushed up into the holder .xyy" if it touches the part too much.  Thanks for sharing the tip.

                      Phil R

                       


                      From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                      To: valleymetal@yahoogroups.com; mill_drill@yahoogroups.com; 3_in_1_Lathe_Mill_Drill@yahoogroups.com; smithy-machines@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 9:11 PM
                      Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                       

                       

                      At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.

                       

                      If you are interested, please see

                       

                       

                      Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

                       

                      For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.

                       

                      Rick

                       




                    • Dan Mauch
                      I agree that on many cnc mills quills there is backlash in the Z axis and the pin menthod would not be accurate. On the other hand, my enco knee mill has a
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                        I agree that on many cnc mills quills  there is backlash in the Z axis  and the pin menthod would not be accurate. On the other hand, my enco knee mill has a .020 backlash in the knee however with the 500lbs of weight on the knee there is no backlash to worry about because the weigh keeps all of the backlash out. On my mill-drill I retrofitted the quill with a zero backlash ballscrew so this technique would probably be fine there.

                         

                         

                        Dan Mauch

                        www.camtronics-cnc.com

                        dmauch@...

                        Stepper and servo motors

                        Kits, assembled and custom CNC using Gecko products.

                         

                      • philr_77378
                        Rick, True that is. Yahoo groups and other forums are wonderful.  Wish I had stared using them many moons ago. Phil R ________________________________ From:
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                          Rick,
                          True that is. Yahoo groups and other forums are wonderful.  Wish I had stared using them many moons ago.
                          Phil R

                          From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                          To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 7:58 AM
                          Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                           
                          Phil,
                           
                          “All of us are smarter than any one of us.” By sharing information, we all get smarter.
                           
                          Rick
                           
                          From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                          Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 10:50 PM
                          To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                           



                          Rick,
                          Nice tip.  Definitely worth a try .  It looks like a better method than my 0.003 thick piece of paper between the tool and the part.  It is very easy to make a mistake and overshoot when using incremental jog down toward the part. Especially if you hurry and use an increment that exceeds the distance between your tool tip and the part.  If a person is diligent when using an end mill in a Welden type setscrew holder, the end mill is biased so the setscrew opposes the end mill from pulling out of the holder. Besides preventing damage to the tool this method helps accuracy because the tool cannot get pushed up into the holder .xyy" if it touches the part too much.  Thanks for sharing the tip.
                          Phil R
                           

                          From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                          To: valleymetal@yahoogroups.com; mill_drill@yahoogroups.com; 3_in_1_Lathe_Mill_Drill@yahoogroups.com; smithy-machines@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 9:11 PM
                          Subject: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                           
                           
                          At a recent visit to Toolcraft, Glendale, Arizona, I talked to a rather talented machinist who shared a nice technique with me. He showed me how he sets the Z axis zero with no risk of a tool crash on a CNC machine.
                           
                          If you are interested, please see
                           
                           
                          Your comments and questions are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.
                           
                          For the full index of my articles, see rick.sparber.org.
                           
                          Rick
                           





                        • philr_77378
                          Rick, I was using the incremental feed in .001 steps when I got close to touch off on paper, just like the manual mill.  Have not overshot it yet, but I
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                            Rick,
                            I was using the incremental feed in .001 steps when I got close to touch off on paper, just like the manual mill.  Have not overshot it yet, but I always knew the possibility was there that I would mistake and select the wrong increment. What is an EEF?   I've seen some different types of z setters and expect to buy one soon.
                            Phil R

                            From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                            To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 7:22 AM
                            Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                             
                            Using the jog function to lower a cutter on a CNC mill is rather interesting. You are going an extremely tiny distance with a lot of force. It still boils down to not being able to occupy a single space with two objects.
                             
                            I used to use paper to set my manual mill. Now I use my EEF. Faster and more accurate.
                             
                            Rick
                             
                            From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                            Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 6:18 AM
                            To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                             



                            Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I'll stick to my piece of paper on the manual mill.  Been using that for years, but I recently acquired my first CNC, and touch off is kind of awkward for me right now.  I grabbed a 0.1875 Dowel pin and tried out your suggestion.  I picked up the surface location easier than before.  I hope to eventually have the more commonly used tools preset.   Thanks for the tip.
                            Phil R
                             


                          • Rick Sparber
                            EEF – Electronic Edge Finder. I have one that clips onto the existing end mill and table. Rick From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                              EEF – Electronic Edge Finder. I have one that clips onto the existing end mill and table.

                               

                              Rick

                               

                              From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                              Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 2:42 PM
                              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                               




                              Rick,

                              I was using the incremental feed in .001 steps when I got close to touch off on paper, just like the manual mill.  Have not overshot it yet, but I always knew the possibility was there that I would mistake and select the wrong increment. What is an EEF?   I've seen some different types of z setters and expect to buy one soon.

                              Phil R


                              From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 7:22 AM
                              Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                               

                               

                              Using the jog function to lower a cutter on a CNC mill is rather interesting. You are going an extremely tiny distance with a lot of force. It still boils down to not being able to occupy a single space with two objects.

                               

                              I used to use paper to set my manual mill. Now I use my EEF. Faster and more accurate.

                               

                              Rick

                               

                              From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                              Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 6:18 AM
                              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                               



                              Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I'll stick to my piece of paper on the manual mill.  Been using that for years, but I recently acquired my first CNC, and touch off is kind of awkward for me right now.  I grabbed a 0.1875 Dowel pin and tried out your suggestion.  I picked up the surface location easier than before.  I hope to eventually have the more commonly used tools preset.   Thanks for the tip.

                              Phil R

                               

                               




                            • philr_77378
                              That may be what I need.  Can you share a link to that, or a picture.  Sounds like an improvement over my starret edge finder. Phil R
                              Message 14 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                                That may be what I need.  Can you share a link to that, or a picture.  Sounds like an improvement over my starret edge finder.
                                Phil R


                                From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 3:59 PM
                                Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                 
                                EEF – Electronic Edge Finder. I have one that clips onto the existing end mill and table.
                                 
                                Rick
                                 
                                From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                                Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 2:42 PM
                                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                                 



                                Rick,
                                I was using the incremental feed in .001 steps when I got close to touch off on paper, just like the manual mill.  Have not overshot it yet, but I always knew the possibility was there that I would mistake and select the wrong increment. What is an EEF?   I've seen some different types of z setters and expect to buy one soon.
                                Phil R

                                From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 7:22 AM
                                Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                                 
                                 
                                Using the jog function to lower a cutter on a CNC mill is rather interesting. You are going an extremely tiny distance with a lot of force. It still boils down to not being able to occupy a single space with two objects.
                                 
                                I used to use paper to set my manual mill. Now I use my EEF. Faster and more accurate.
                                 
                                Rick
                                 
                                From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                                Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 6:18 AM
                                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill
                                 


                                Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I'll stick to my piece of paper on the manual mill.  Been using that for years, but I recently acquired my first CNC, and touch off is kind of awkward for me right now.  I grabbed a 0.1875 Dowel pin and tried out your suggestion.  I picked up the surface location easier than before.  I hope to eventually have the more commonly used tools preset.   Thanks for the tip.
                                Phil R
                                 
                                 





                              • Kurt Laughlin
                                That s sensible, but it depends on two things to work: The work surface must be very smooth and flat, and it cannot be out of parallel with the table. If the
                                Message 15 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                                  That’s sensible, but it depends on two things to work:  The work surface must be very smooth and flat, and it cannot be out of parallel with the table.  If the part is rough, the height of the dowel pin can vary by more than the safe increment as it rolls under the cutter.  If it is out of parallel, it can drop or rise as it rolls as well.  In both cases this can give a bad setting.  If the desired accuracy is large compared to the variation, this can usually be ignored, otherwise it’s a killer.

                                   

                                  KL

                                • Rick Sparber
                                  Phil, There are three models. Which one to use depends on the electrical resistance of the spindle bearings. Although designed to be used on the lathe, it
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                                    Phil,

                                     

                                    There are three models. Which one to use depends on the electrical resistance of the spindle bearings. Although designed to be used on the lathe, it works fine on the mill.

                                     

                                    If you go to

                                     

                                    http://rick.sparber.org/ma.htm#6

                                     

                                    you will see 3 articles just above the heading marked “7. Lathe Technique Return to top.” These are the 3 models. I also have

                                     

                                    http://rick.sparber.org/ueef.pdf

                                     

                                    which explains what is being measure. Then there is this article explains how to measure these extremely small resistances

                                     

                                    http://rick.sparber.org/ueef.pdf

                                     

                                     

                                    Kits will be sold in the near future. The Model 1 beta testing phase is almost over and commercial boards are being used. I just received commercial boards for the Model 1.5 today but have not built it yet. I also got two commercial boards for the Model 2 and built one. So far, it looks good. The plan is to sell kits and also finished units.

                                     

                                    Rick

                                     

                                    From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                                    Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 3:50 PM
                                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                     




                                    That may be what I need.  Can you share a link to that, or a picture.  Sounds like an improvement over my starret edge finder.

                                    Phil R

                                     


                                    From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 3:59 PM
                                    Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                     

                                     

                                    EEF – Electronic Edge Finder. I have one that clips onto the existing end mill and table.

                                     

                                    Rick

                                     

                                    From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                                    Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 2:42 PM
                                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                     



                                    Rick,

                                    I was using the incremental feed in .001 steps when I got close to touch off on paper, just like the manual mill.  Have not overshot it yet, but I always knew the possibility was there that I would mistake and select the wrong increment. What is an EEF?   I've seen some different types of z setters and expect to buy one soon.

                                    Phil R


                                    From: Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...>
                                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 7:22 AM
                                    Subject: RE: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                     

                                     

                                    Using the jog function to lower a cutter on a CNC mill is rather interesting. You are going an extremely tiny distance with a lot of force. It still boils down to not being able to occupy a single space with two objects.

                                     

                                    I used to use paper to set my manual mill. Now I use my EEF. Faster and more accurate.

                                     

                                    Rick

                                     

                                    From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of philr_77378@...
                                    Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 6:18 AM
                                    To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [mill_drill] new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                     

                                     

                                    Your dowel pin suggestion is great for the CNC type because of the chance your increment may be larger than your remaining gap.  I'll stick to my piece of paper on the manual mill.  Been using that for years, but I recently acquired my first CNC, and touch off is kind of awkward for me right now.  I grabbed a 0.1875 Dowel pin and tried out your suggestion.  I picked up the surface location easier than before.  I hope to eventually have the more commonly used tools preset.   Thanks for the tip.

                                    Phil R

                                     

                                     



                                     




                                  • Rick Sparber
                                    Kurt, The intent here is to set the Z axis with respect to a reference surface, not the workpiece. So you would have a smooth and flat surface. These
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Jan 14, 2013
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                                      Kurt,

                                       

                                      The intent here is to set the Z axis with respect to a reference surface, not the workpiece. So you would have a smooth and flat surface. These commercial CNC mills are also very precisely trammed so that is not an issue.

                                       

                                      Rick

                                       

                                      From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kurt Laughlin
                                      Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 5:26 PM
                                      To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [mill_drill] Re: new article: A Safe and Accurate Way to Set Zero on a Vertical Mill

                                       




                                      That’s sensible, but it depends on two things to work:  The work surface must be very smooth and flat, and it cannot be out of parallel with the table.  If the part is rough, the height of the dowel pin can vary by more than the safe increment as it rolls under the cutter.  If it is out of parallel, it can drop or rise as it rolls as well.  In both cases this can give a bad setting.  If the desired accuracy is large compared to the variation, this can usually be ignored, otherwise it’s a killer.

                                       

                                      KL




                                    • mrwhiz49
                                      Good idea. I ve been using adjustable parallels to snug between the tool and work.
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Jan 23, 2013
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                                        Good idea. I've been using adjustable parallels to snug between the tool and work.
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