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Re: hss vs carbide

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  • EdwinB
    The key word you used, Phil
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012
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      The key word you used, Phil< was "efficient". In industrial applications, the desire is to remove a lot of metal, quickly, and with minimum down time for tool replacement or sharpening. Carbide is is a good choice under those conditions.

      Note that carbide will work just as well at lower speeds. In the home shop environment, carbide has several downsides: it is more expensive than HSS, you can't make your own form tools, it is harder to sharpen than HSS, and it doesn't produce as nice a finish as a well-sharpened HSS tool. Carbide is brittle, and it tends to shatter on interrupted cuts. (I don't know how the handle that in an industrial environment, other than planning their cuts.)

      Regards,
      Ed

      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "strider1a" <pwaller1a@...> wrote:
      >
      > My understanding is that efficient use of carbide tooling requires high speeds. Does this mean that we are better off using hss tooling since our mills turn at lower rpm's than industrial machines?
      > Phil
      >
    • Starlight Tool Services Ltd
      When I was in millwright school, I was turning (threading) a section of spring steel, and we were handed a bunch of HSS bits and told to go sharpen and use
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012
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        When I was in millwright school, I was turning (threading) a section of spring steel, and we were handed a bunch of HSS bits and told to go sharpen and use them.  After many times of taking a pass, removing cutter and resharpening, then taking the next pass, the instructor came over and said "wait a moment, I will be right back."  He came back with 60 deg brazed carbide bit and said OK now finish off the job, you know how to sharpen the bits.  I had the job done lickety split after that.
         
        Ever since, I have only used HSS when nothing else will do.  I have moved out of the Brazed Carbides into Carbide inserts and tend to use mostly DC(M or G)T 55 deg and CC (M or G)T 80 deg inserts.
         
        For the mill, I have both HSS bits and carbide insert bits, depending on the size needed.  Fly cutter gets Brazed Carbide!
         
        Walter 
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: EdwinB
        Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2012 11:18 AM
        Subject: [mill_drill] Re: hss vs carbide

         

        The key word you used, Phil< was "efficient". In industrial applications, the desire is to remove a lot of metal, quickly, and with minimum down time for tool replacement or sharpening. Carbide is is a good choice under those conditions.

        Note that carbide will work just as well at lower speeds. In the home shop environment, carbide has several downsides: it is more expensive than HSS, you can't make your own form tools, it is harder to sharpen than HSS, and it doesn't produce as nice a finish as a well-sharpened HSS tool. Carbide is brittle, and it tends to shatter on interrupted cuts. (I don't know how the handle that in an industrial environment, other than planning their cuts.)

        Regards,
        Ed

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "strider1a" <pwaller1a@...> wrote:
        >
        > My understanding is that efficient use of carbide tooling requires high speeds. Does this mean that we are better off using hss tooling since our mills turn at lower rpm's than industrial machines?
        > Phil
        >

      • Bill
        I do more work with alloy and hardened steels, and mostly use carbide insert tooling. But..for profile cutting, such as oil & grease grooves, snap-ring and
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012

        I do more work with alloy and hardened steels, and mostly use carbide insert tooling.

        But….for profile cutting, such as oil & grease grooves, snap-ring and o-ring grooves, I generally use HSS. Buying all the different sizes & configurations I need would get pretty spendy. HSS is cheap, and easy to make my own cutter that will suits the job at hand. Gotta slow down compared to what you can do with carbide, and coolant or oil are important, but that’s OK with me.

         

        Attached pics are of a custom HSS tool, and the test run for a prism mounting shaft, to check my tool grinding. Material is 4140 Q&T, about 32 Rc.

        I built two dozen of ‘em, and never needed a regrind. Slow….and some Enco No 1 cutting fluid.

         

        Bill

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