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Round column RF30/RF31 conversion plans available?

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  • chris_attebery
    Hi guys, My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I ve decided that it is time to
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 15, 2012
      Hi guys,

      My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.

      I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.

      Thanks,


      Chris
    • Mike Roberts
      I used the homecnc plans to convert my HF40 round column gear-head mill drill about 4 years ago.  I thought they were very well done and a good value for the
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 15, 2012
        I used the homecnc plans to convert my HF40 round column gear-head mill drill about 4 years ago.  I thought they were very well done and a good value for the spend. I made a few changes along the way, but I definitely recommend the plans from Jeff. If you are looking for alternative designs for the Z axis specifically, Dan Mauch recently posted a message and a YouTube video of a ballscrew-driven Z axis setup he put together that you might want to take a look at, as well.
        Good luck.
         
         
        Mike Roberts

      • dmauch@seanet.com
        Here is the video of the ballscrew driven z axis http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-SMbBvqwmE&feature=youtu.be ... The reason was simple it came stock with .020
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 16, 2012
          Here is the video of the ballscrew driven z axis

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-SMbBvqwmE&feature=youtu.be

          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, dmauch@... wrote:
          >
          > About 12 years ago I modified my RF31 Tawain built mill drill quill drive.
          The reason was simple it came stock with .020" vertical play. I took the
          mechnaism apart and mofified the pinion shaft and installed two eccentric
          bushing to remove the slop between the pinion and the rack. I also had to modify
          the fine feed worm wheel housing to reduce the slop in it. When done I had about
          .002 backlash. That was a good design back then but was probably beyond the
          capabilities of some owners.
          > Fast forward to now where I removed the Quill Position indicator indicator
          and installed a 3/4 thick cast aluminum plate under the power frame head body
          and the feed base. The plate holds a radial ball bearing
          > two thrust bearings, a stepper motor, a 42 tooth pulley and the ballscrew and
          ball nut. In this case the ball nut rotates and drives the ballscrew up and
          down. One end of the ball nut is attached to the inverted feed base on the
          quill. A 270 oz in stepper motor with a 2.8/1 ratio timing belt drive rotates
          the ballnut which drives the quill up and down. A check with my dial indicator
          show zero backlash.
          > I hope to make a video of it in operation in the next few days.Time
          permitting.
          > I have seen other designs wher ethey simply drive the fine feed shaft with a
          stepper motors but don't do anything about the vertical slop in the quill. I
          guess they have to write their G code to add a M06 so they can lock and unlock
          the quill
          > I have only seen one other design that uses a ballscrew on the quill of a
          RF31. That design is very nice but has 38 parts. My design has only
          > 3/4" plate
          > 1"ID radial bearing
          > 2 1" ID needle thrust bearings
          > 5/8 inch ball nut
          > timing belt pulley 42T
          > ballnut transfer hub
          > ball screw .2 pitch
          > 270 oz on stepper motor
          > 4 spacers
          > quill base extension
          > fasteners
          > Speed using a G540 driver is about 45 IPM.
          > I also modified my XY axis ballscrew drive by removing the existing stepper
          motor mou8nts and installing a direct drive. Using a 465 oz in Nema 34 motor I
          can get 200 IPM in rapid moves.
          > Dan Mauch
          > WWW.camtronics-cnc.com
          > dmauch@...
          > low cost stepper motor systems using Gecko Drive products
          >







          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi guys,
          >
          > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.
          >
          > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          >
          > Chris
          >
        • internal_fire
          I followed the plans from Roland Freistad that were published in Home Shop Machinist over a number of years. In particular there were series of articles in
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 16, 2012
            I followed the plans from Roland Freistad that were published in Home Shop Machinist over a number of years. In particular there were series of articles in 1990, 2002, and 2007.

            I did not follow everything in exact detail, but I did use his method for mounting the ball screws and for creating thrust bearing mountings.

            I made low-backlash ball nut mounts following the ideas from Country Bubba, who is active on this list.

            The result works well, and I can keep the backlash under 0.001". Previously I measured backlash of 10-20 mils.

            The Freistad write-ups are a little bit confusing since they span three generations of design. If you want to go that way I might be able to scratch up PDF copies (about 12 MB) of the articles.

            Gene



            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi guys,
            >
            > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.
            >
            > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            >
            > Chris
            >
          • chris_attebery
            Thanks Mike, I have a couple changes I d like to make to his X/Y brackets, mainly tucking the Y axis under the table and the X in front of the table to keep it
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 16, 2012
              Thanks Mike,

              I have a couple changes I'd like to make to his X/Y brackets, mainly tucking the Y axis under the table and the X in front of the table to keep it compact.

              I also saw Dan's Z axis video. That was the tripping point for me. I decided with a decent Z axis drive I could live with the 5" throw.



              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Mike Roberts <griz9729@...> wrote:
              >
              > I used the homecnc plans to convert my HF40 round column gear-head mill drill about 4 years ago.  I thought they were very well done and a good value for the spend. I made a few changes along the way, but I definitely recommend the plans from Jeff. If you are looking for alternative designs for the Z axis specifically, Dan Mauch recently posted a message and a YouTube video of a ballscrew-driven Z axis setup he put together that you might want to take a look at, as well.
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-SMbBvqwmE&feature=youtu.be
              >
              > Good luck.
              >  
              >  
              > Mike Roberts
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              >
            • Dan Mauch
              I should show you my ballscrew setup. It is much simpler than Jeff s. Don t get me wrong , Jeff has a really nice design but I think it can be simplified. I
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 16, 2012

                I should show you my ballscrew setup. It is much simpler than Jeff’s. Don’t get me wrong , Jeff has a really nice design but I think it can be simplified. I made my newest setup direct drive using 465 oz in nema 34 stepper motors. I get over 200 IPM rapids  and more than enough power. By direct driving the ballscrew you actually get increased force. In the equation F =Troque X2  pi X the ballscrew pitch X the efficiency divided by 16 oz I get 400X6.28X5X.916=714 lbs of force

                 

                Dan Mauch

                www.camtronics-cnc.com

                dmauch@...

                Stepper and servo motors

                Kits, assembled and custom CNC using Gecko products.

                 

              • chris_attebery
                Well, my plans have changed. Last night I found a buyer for my mill drill. I decided it would be better to start with a square column machine. Right now I am
                Message 7 of 19 , Oct 17, 2012
                  Well, my plans have changed. Last night I found a buyer for my mill drill. I decided it would be better to start with a square column machine. Right now I am looking at the Grizzly G0463 or G0619 with the CNC Fusion ball screw and mount kit. I'm still deciding which electronics to go with. This way I can make parts right away instead of working on the machine for a couple months.

                  The parts I make for my business are all less than 1/4" thick and usually 6061 or 7075. My sales are pretty low so if I can pop out 25 pieces in a couple hours here and there I am golden.

                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi guys,
                  >
                  > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.
                  >
                  > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  >
                  >
                  > Chris
                  >
                • Mike Roberts
                  If I were at a restart point like you are now, I would seriously consider just purchasing a CNC machine that is all ready to go  (something like a Tormach or
                  Message 8 of 19 , Oct 17, 2012
                    If I were at a restart point like you are now, I would seriously consider just purchasing a CNC machine that is all ready to go  (something like a Tormach or a Bolton or a Seig, depending on the performance and features you need and money you have to spend).  I spend a lot of time keeping my retrofit machine up and going and trying to improve the performance and spent a lot of time and money to retrofit it in the first place. Realistically, it will never have the accuracy or performance of a purpose built CNC.  Mine might not be a popular view, but I believe I would have ultimately been way ahead both time and money wise had I just bought a proven, purpose engineered CNC mill  from a reputable manufacturer, right out of the chute.  I did enjoy doing the retrofit and learned a lot along the way, but I am also not using it to do production work.  I will ultimately be selling my retrofit machine and purchasing something like a small Haas or Fadal machine to support money-making work.  Just one guy's opinion.  Your results may vary.
                     
                    Mike Roberts
                    >
                    >
                    > Chris
                    >

                  • chris_attebery
                    Mike, I appreciate your feedback. I have a couple limitations right now. 1. Budget. I can only afford to spend about $3k on the project. 2. Space. I only have
                    Message 9 of 19 , Oct 18, 2012
                      Mike,

                      I appreciate your feedback. I have a couple limitations right now.

                      1. Budget. I can only afford to spend about $3k on the project.
                      2. Space. I only have 60"x36" to work with.
                      3. Return on investment. I only buy about $1000 worth of machined parts a year to sell for my business. It's take me a LONG time to break even on a RTR CNC machine.

                      The only other option I can find is a Dyna 2400. I found one I could pick up for around $2500. It only has a 6x5x4 envelope, but it would be fine for the parts I produce. Maybe I should just persue that for now.


                      Chris

                      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Mike Roberts <griz9729@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > If I were at a restart point like you are now, I would seriously consider just purchasing a CNC machine that is all ready to go  (something like a Tormach or a Bolton or a Seig, depending on the performance and features you need and money you have to spend).  I spend a lot of time keeping my retrofit machine up and going and trying to improve the performance and spent a lot of time and money to retrofit it in the first place. Realistically, it will never have the accuracy or performance of a purpose built CNC.  Mine might not be a popular view, but I believe I would have ultimately been way ahead both time and money wise had I just bought a proven, purpose engineered CNC mill  from a reputable manufacturer, right out of the chute.  I did enjoy doing the retrofit and learned a lot along the way, but I am also not using it to do production work.  I will ultimately be selling my retrofit machine and purchasing something like a small Haas or
                      > Fadal machine to support money-making work.  Just one guy's opinion.  Your results may vary.
                      >
                      >
                      > Mike Roberts
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Chris
                      > >
                      >
                    • Mike Roberts
                      Sounds like you are on the right track, given your situation.  Good luck! Mike Roberts ________________________________ From: chris_attebery
                      Message 10 of 19 , Oct 18, 2012
                        Sounds like you are on the right track, given your situation. 
                        Good luck!
                         
                        Mike Roberts
                        From: chris_attebery <chris.attebery@...>
                        To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, October 18, 2012 8:50 AM
                        Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Round column RF30/RF31 conversion plans available?
                         
                        Mike,

                        I appreciate your feedback. I have a couple limitations right now.

                        1. Budget. I can only afford to spend about $3k on the project.
                        2. Space. I only have 60"x36" to work with.
                        3. Return on investment. I only buy about $1000 worth of machined parts a year to sell for my business. It's take me a LONG time to break even on a RTR CNC machine.

                        The only other option I can find is a Dyna 2400. I found one I could pick up for around $2500. It only has a 6x5x4 envelope, but it would be fine for the parts I produce. Maybe I should just persue that for now.

                        Chris

                        --- In mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com, Mike Roberts <griz9729@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > If I were at a restart point like you are now, I would seriously consider just purchasing a CNC machine that is all ready to go  (something like a Tormach or a Bolton or a Seig, depending on the performance and features you need and money you have to spend).  I spend a lot of time keeping my retrofit machine up and going and trying to improve the performance and spent a lot of time and money to retrofit it in the first place. Realistically, it will never have the accuracy or performance of a purpose built CNC.  Mine might not be a popular view, but I believe I would have ultimately been way ahead both time and money wise had I just bought a proven, purpose engineered CNC mill  from a reputable manufacturer, right out of the chute.  I did enjoy doing the retrofit and learned a lot along the way, but I am also not using it to do production work.  I will ultimately be selling my retrofit machine and purchasing something like a small Haas or
                        > Fadal machine to support money-making work.  Just one guy's opinion.  Your results may vary.
                        >
                        >
                        > Mike Roberts
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Chris
                        > >
                        >

                      • leasingham_connelly
                        I am not interested in adding CNC to my machine (at the moment, who knows about the future?) but would like to improve the quill movement, just tightening the
                        Message 11 of 19 , Oct 19, 2012
                          I am not interested in adding CNC to my machine (at the moment, who knows about the future?) but would like to improve the quill movement, just tightening the quill with the original setup changes the position on the digital readout. I would also like to add z axis power feed. I think I will consider a setup like Dan's but with a small 3 phase motor and the spare low power VFD I have. It seems to me that adding a speed control and up/stop/down toggle switch at the front of the machine would be an easy job. Adding a manual turning disk with lock should also be easy. I think I can also add a quick retract button for use when drilling, a simple two throw sprung to off toggle with suitable resistor on one throw should work. I also need to consider if there will be any problem with tapping. I currently do this with the worm drive disconnected and use feel on the lever with a loose square drive to allow some leeway to allow the tap to feed itself at the correct rate. The question is which is best, make it easy to disconnect ballscrew drive or use the VFD in some way to give the correct feed rate to the tap? An automatic depth stop (and necessary up stop) is also an option with this setup. Time to give it some thought I think.

                          Martin

                          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Mike Roberts <griz9729@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > If I were at a restart point like you are now, I would seriously consider just purchasing a CNC machine that is all ready to go  (something like a Tormach or a Bolton or a Seig, depending on the performance and features you need and money you have to spend).  I spend a lot of time keeping my retrofit machine up and going and trying to improve the performance and spent a lot of time and money to retrofit it in the first place. Realistically, it will never have the accuracy or performance of a purpose built CNC.  Mine might not be a popular view, but I believe I would have ultimately been way ahead both time and money wise had I just bought a proven, purpose engineered CNC mill  from a reputable manufacturer, right out of the chute.  I did enjoy doing the retrofit and learned a lot along the way, but I am also not using it to do production work.  I will ultimately be selling my retrofit machine and purchasing something like a small Haas or
                          > Fadal machine to support money-making work.  Just one guy's opinion.  Your results may vary.
                          >
                          >
                          > Mike Roberts
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Chris
                          > >
                          >
                        • Jim S.
                          It sounds like you can do what you want with what you have. In order: 1.) $3K should get you the machine, parts, and electronics/software. You will have to do
                          Message 12 of 19 , Oct 19, 2012
                            It sounds like you can do what you want with what you have. In order:
                             
                            1.) $3K should get you the machine, parts, and electronics/software. You will have to do the integration yourself. I am assuming you get a standard round column milldrill like the Grizzly G1006. In the last few years companies like Gecko and Keling have made building the electronics a menu picking process. There are so many computers out there that can run software like Mach3 or EMC that that part of the equation is almost a freebie. A low end single processer pc with a small (<100 gig)  hard drive should be cheaper than the bits and pieces of hardware and wiring.
                             
                            2.) Three by five feet is tight, but should be usable if the five feet is along the x-axis. Squeezing the cnc part of the equation into that space will require some ingenuity and maybe a bit of fudging to accomplish. The trick is to get the electronics you don't need out of the way while putting the man-machine interface right in front where you need it, without exposing either part to chips, coolant or other shop environment rudenesses. You'll have to get innovative here, like putting the electronics on a rolling cart you move around as needed. BTW, when I first read your post I thought it said 60 x 36 FEET, and I thought "This is a limit?!!" Friday night brain fry, I guess.
                             
                            3.) ROI and payback are something you have to decide for yourself. There are ways to figure ROI and payback, but you also should consider whether it will improve imponderables like turnaround time and flexibility of design. You might also ask yourself if having in house machining capability will help you sell more of whatever you will be making.. This will change the payback calculation, and frankly, make you feel better about the investment.
                             
                            I don't know anything about the Dyna 2400, but buying used cnc equipment has its own pitfalls. OTOH, the two Dyna 2400's currently on ebay are asking $3599 and $6000 respectively, so your $2500 would probably be recoverable if you find yourself going "If I could just make this an inch taller/wider" in six months. Just make sure everything works, you get or can get the manuals, and you can source repair parts. We hobbyists can take a couple of weeks to design and make a repair part for our machines. Most businesses need the machine back online NOW and substitute money for time.
                             
                            Just my $.02 worth ($1.39 after taxes, shipping and handling)
                             
                            Jim (Just a guy who likes to build stuff)
                             
                            You said:
                             
                            1. Budget. I can only afford to spend about $3k on the project.
                            2. Space. I only have 60"x36" to work with.
                            3. Return on investment. I only buy about $1000 worth of machined parts a year to sell for my business. It's take me a LONG time to break even on a RTR CNC machine.

                            The only other option I can find is a Dyna 2400. I found one I could pick up for around $2500. It only has a 6x5x4 envelope, but it would be fine for the parts I produce. Maybe I should just persue that for now.

                            Chris

                          • Jim S.
                            Chris. I almost forgot. You should check out the DIY-CNC group on Yahoo. They know far more about cnc conversions than I do. Jim (Just a guy who likes to build
                            Message 13 of 19 , Oct 20, 2012
                              Chris.
                               
                              I almost forgot. You should check out the DIY-CNC group on Yahoo. They know far more about cnc conversions than I do.
                               
                              Jim (Just a guy who likes to build stuff)
                            • Larry
                              ... The classic problem I ve had has to do with the stability of the Z axis wanting to rotate on the round column. Did I miss some way of mitigating that other
                              Message 14 of 19 , Oct 21, 2012
                                --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Hi guys,
                                >
                                > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.
                                >
                                > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.
                                >
                                > Thanks,
                                >
                                >
                                > Chris
                                >

                                The classic problem I've had has to do with the stability of the Z axis wanting to rotate on the round column.

                                Did I miss some way of mitigating that other than very light cuts that put almost no side load on the machine ?
                              • Corey Renner
                                The head will rotate on the column once the cheap chinese clamping bolts start stretching. Replace them asap with quality fasteners. Once the original bolts
                                Message 15 of 19 , Oct 21, 2012
                                  The head will rotate on the column once the cheap chinese clamping bolts start stretching.  Replace them asap with quality fasteners.  Once the original bolts stretch too much, they become very difficult to remove.

                                  cheers,
                                  c

                                  On Sun, Oct 21, 2012 at 7:55 AM, Larry <larry@...> wrote:

                                  The classic problem I've had has to do with the stability of the Z axis wanting to rotate on the round column.

                                  Did I miss some way of mitigating that other than very light cuts that put almost no side load on the machine ?

                                • RedfieldRH@aol.com
                                  I found a great way to upgrade those cheap clamping bolts. I happened to have a hold down set that was too large for my mill drill as it was based on 1/2 in
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Oct 21, 2012
                                    I found a great way to upgrade those cheap clamping bolts. I happened to have a hold down set that was too large for my mill drill as it was based on 1/2 in threads (next size up from my mill). I selected three of the long extension rods threaded on both ends. I think I had to pass a 1/2 in  drill through to clear the hole, but then inserted the threaded rods through. I then threaded on one of the flanged clamping nuts on the left side, and on the right side reused the chrome plated tapered washers, but placed three of the connecting nuts (1 in long) on the right side. Now I have a beefy, 1 in long hex nut that sticks out of the head casing and is much easier to get a wrench on to tighten. To finish I stuck a small, think neodymium magnet on the head near the nuts and the wrench is stored there, available at all times.

                                    I can take a picture of the setup if anyone is interested.

                                    Rick



                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: Corey Renner <vandal968@...>
                                    To: mill_drill <mill_drill@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Sun, Oct 21, 2012 10:00 am
                                    Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: Round column RF30/RF31 conversion plans available?

                                     
                                    The head will rotate on the column once the cheap chinese clamping bolts start stretching.  Replace them asap with quality fasteners.  Once the original bolts stretch too much, they become very difficult to remove.

                                    cheers,
                                    c

                                    On Sun, Oct 21, 2012 at 7:55 AM, Larry <larry@...> wrote:
                                    The classic problem I've had has to do with the stability of the Z axis wanting to rotate on the round column.

                                    Did I miss some way of mitigating that other than very light cuts that put almost no side load on the machine ?

                                  • mrwhiz49
                                    Hi, I have a complete kit for $1500
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Oct 26, 2012
                                      Hi,
                                      I have a complete kit for $1500

                                      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Hi guys,
                                      >
                                      > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.
                                      >
                                      > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks,
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Chris
                                      >
                                    • Gary Crowell
                                      Ok, that s nice. Some details, pictures, a web page perhaps... would be useful.
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Oct 27, 2012

                                        Ok, that's nice.  Some details, pictures, a web page perhaps... would be useful.

                                        On Oct 26, 2012 11:45 PM, "mrwhiz49" <pthomps2@...> wrote:
                                         

                                        Hi,
                                        I have a complete kit for $1500

                                        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Hi guys,
                                        >
                                        > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.info and I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any others available before I get started.
                                        >
                                        > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can get a set make for around $150.
                                        >
                                        > Thanks,
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Chris
                                        >

                                      • mrwhiz49
                                        I posted some pictures
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Oct 27, 2012
                                          I posted some pictures

                                          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Gary Crowell <garyacrowellsr@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Ok, that's nice. Some details, pictures, a web page perhaps... would be
                                          > useful.
                                          > On Oct 26, 2012 11:45 PM, "mrwhiz49" <pthomps2@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > > **
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > Hi,
                                          > > I have a complete kit for $1500
                                          > >
                                          > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "chris_attebery" <chris.attebery@>
                                          > > wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Hi guys,
                                          > > >
                                          > > > My CNC mill purchase fell through. So I have an Enco round column
                                          > > mill-drill that I have owned for about 15 years. I've decided that it is
                                          > > time to convert it to CNC. I'm looking for a set of plans for the brackets
                                          > > and ball screws. I have seen the plans offered by Jeff at homecnc.infoand I really like his Z axis setup, but I'd like to see if there are any
                                          > > others available before I get started.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > I do not want to buy another machine to convert. I understand the
                                          > > limitations of this machine and it is fine for the parts I make. I'm hoping
                                          > > to keep it under $1500 if I do the bulk of the work. I have a 12x36 lathe
                                          > > too, so I can cut/thread the ball screws if needed, but it looks like I can
                                          > > get a set make for around $150.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Thanks,
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Chris
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          >
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