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Howto cut 2 flats on a rod?

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  • Curtis J Blank
    So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without spending a lot of
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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      So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
      vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without
      spending a lot of time setting up for the second cut. I used to do it
      all the time when I worked in a machine shop, cutting wrench flats on
      the end of piston rods for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders, but that
      was on a horizontal milling machine. Piece a cake there.

      I did this yesterday but I cut 4 flats which then let me do the
      alignment using a square off the table. But to do two the first flat
      would be on the bottom when cutting the second flat and I can't think of
      as easy, accurate way to align that first cut so it's parallel to what
      will be the second cut. A gauge block with maybe using shims or feeler
      gauges so as to not lift the rod does comes to mind. Still may be if'y
      though on not lifting the rod.

      And since I made two cuts on each flat to dial it in if I machined a
      block it would be high for the first cut. Could make two blocks I guess
      but then that's not easy IMO making something to make something which
      might be a one time shot.

      Ideas?
    • Corey Renner
      Stick it in a collet block, cut one side, flip it, cut the other. cheers, c On Sun, Jun 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Curtis J Blank
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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        Stick it in a collet block, cut one side, flip it, cut the other.

        cheers,
        c

        On Sun, Jun 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Curtis J Blank <Curt.Blank@...> wrote:
         

        So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
        vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without 

      • Curtis J Blank
        Whoa! I like that! Wasn t familiar with collect blocks, but now I am. Do they make them for R8 collets? See 5C but don t really want to then buy 5C collets for
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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          Whoa! I like that! Wasn't familiar with collect blocks, but now I am. Do they make them for R8 collets? See 5C but don't really want to then buy 5C collets for every rod size I might ever want to do.

          But this got me thinking, thanks, I like the simplicity of it. Making blocks might be an option. Or making a vee block type jig would then allow for multiple sizes. Would think somebody would make something like that. Have to look around now.

          On 06/03/12 13:39, Corey Renner wrote: Stick it in a collet block, cut one side, flip it, cut the other.

          cheers,
          c

          On Sun, Jun 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Curtis J Blank <Curt.Blank@...> wrote:
           

          So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
          vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without 


        • November X-Ray
          You can cut three flats with the round work piece clamped horizontally in a vice without ever removing the work piece. Both sides and the top, so for just
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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            You can cut three flats with the round work piece clamped horizontally in a vice without ever removing the work piece. Both sides and the top, so for just two flats for a wrench could be fairly easy cut along both sides by relocating the "Y" axis 

            From: Curtis J Blank <Curt.Blank@...>
            To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2012 2:35 PM
            Subject: [mill_drill] Howto cut 2 flats on a rod?

             
            So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
            vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without
            spending a lot of time setting up for the second cut. I used to do it
            all the time when I worked in a machine shop, cutting wrench flats on
            the end of piston rods for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders, but that
            was on a horizontal milling machine. Piece a cake there.

            I did this yesterday but I cut 4 flats which then let me do the
            alignment using a square off the table. But to do two the first flat
            would be on the bottom when cutting the second flat and I can't think of
            as easy, accurate way to align that first cut so it's parallel to what
            will be the second cut. A gauge block with maybe using shims or feeler
            gauges so as to not lift the rod does comes to mind. Still may be if'y
            though on not lifting the rod.

            And since I made two cuts on each flat to dial it in if I machined a
            block it would be high for the first cut. Could make two blocks I guess
            but then that's not easy IMO making something to make something which
            might be a one time shot.

            Ideas?


          • Curtis J Blank
            But then the sides would have to be wider to allow for the radius of the cutter correct? I thought of that, that wasn t desirable, I wanted it squared, one of
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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              But then the sides would have to be wider to allow for the radius of the cutter correct? I thought of that, that wasn't desirable, I wanted it squared, one of the reasons I did 4 flats, at first was going to only do two till I realized four be easier, and actually like how the four look verses two. But still want a good way to know how to do two hence the question.

              On 06/03/12 14:03, November X-Ray wrote:
              You can cut three flats with the round work piece clamped horizontally in a vice without ever removing the work piece. Both sides and the top, so for just two flats for a wrench could be fairly easy cut along both sides by relocating the "Y" axis 

              From: Curtis J Blank <Curt.Blank@...>
              To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2012 2:35 PM
              Subject: [mill_drill] Howto cut 2 flats on a rod?

               
              So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
              vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without
              spending a lot of time setting up for the second cut. I used to do it
              all the time when I worked in a machine shop, cutting wrench flats on
              the end of piston rods for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders, but that
              was on a horizontal milling machine. Piece a cake there.

              I did this yesterday but I cut 4 flats which then let me do the
              alignment using a square off the table. But to do two the first flat
              would be on the bottom when cutting the second flat and I can't think of
              as easy, accurate way to align that first cut so it's parallel to what
              will be the second cut. A gauge block with maybe using shims or feeler
              gauges so as to not lift the rod does comes to mind. Still may be if'y
              though on not lifting the rod.

              And since I made two cuts on each flat to dial it in if I machined a
              block it would be high for the first cut. Could make two blocks I guess
              but then that's not easy IMO making something to make something which
              might be a one time shot.

              Ideas?



            • Rexarino
              Mount the rod horizontally off the floor of the mill table, perhaps in a Vee block. Use the side of an end mill to cut a flat on one SIDE (not top or bottom)
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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                Mount the rod horizontally off the floor of the mill table, perhaps in a Vee block.  Use the side of an end mill to cut a flat on one SIDE (not top or bottom) of the rod to the correct depth.  Move the end mill to the other side of the rod, opposite your first cut, and make the second flat.  Don't move the rod between cuts.

                On Sun, Jun 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Curtis J Blank <Curt.Blank@...> wrote:
                So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
                vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without
                spending a lot of time setting up for the second cut. I used to do it
                all the time when I worked in a machine shop, cutting wrench flats on
                the end of piston rods for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders, but that
                was on a horizontal milling machine. Piece a cake there.

                I did this yesterday but I cut 4 flats which then let me do the
                alignment using a square off the table. But to do two the first flat
                would be on the bottom when cutting the second flat and I can't think of
                as easy, accurate way to align that first cut so it's parallel to what
                will be the second cut. A gauge block with maybe using shims or feeler
                gauges so as to not lift the rod does comes to mind. Still may be if'y
                though on not lifting the rod.

                And since I made two cuts on each flat to dial it in if I machined a
                block it would be high for the first cut. Could make two blocks I guess
                but then that's not easy IMO making something to make something which
                might be a one time shot.

                Ideas?


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              • Bill
                Don t know if they make R8 collet blocks, but if you buy a set of 5C collet blocks.... http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=235-7050 ....and a set of 5C
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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                  Don't know if they make R8 collet blocks, but if you buy a set of 5C collet blocks....
                  http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=235-7050
                  ....and a set of 5C collets.....
                  http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-5021
                  .....then you'll be set up for a spin index later.....
                  http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-2280

                  ....and then....you can do a lot more stuff than just make wrench flats.....5C collets come in square, round, metric, and I always have one or two emergency collets laying around, if I need a specific diameter I don't have in my set.

                  Can't have too many toys.... :)



                  :) Bill




                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Curtis J Blank <Curt.Blank@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Whoa! I like that! Wasn't familiar with collect blocks, but now I am. Do
                  > they make them for R8 collets? See 5C but don't really want to then buy
                  > 5C collets for every rod size I might ever want to do.
                  >
                  > But this got me thinking, thanks, I like the simplicity of it. Making
                  > blocks might be an option. Or making a vee block type jig would then
                  > allow for multiple sizes. Would think somebody would make something like
                  > that. Have to look around now.
                  >
                  > On 06/03/12 13:39, Corey Renner wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Stick it in a collet block, cut one side, flip it, cut the other.
                  > >
                  > > cheers,
                  > > c
                  > >
                  > > On Sun, Jun 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Curtis J Blank
                  > > Curt.Blank@... <mailto:Curt.Blank@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
                  > > vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and
                  > > without
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Curt Wuollet
                  I use a spindex for the indexing with a vise if the flat are down the rod from the collet.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 3, 2012
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                    I use a spindex for the indexing with a vise if the flat are
                    down the rod from the collet.

                    Curtis J Blank wrote:
                    >
                    > So how does one go about cutting two wrench flats on a diameter on a
                    > vertical milling machine accurately? Not on the end of a rod and without
                    > spending a lot of time setting up for the second cut. I used to do it
                    > all the time when I worked in a machine shop, cutting wrench flats on
                    > the end of piston rods for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders, but that
                    > was on a horizontal milling machine. Piece a cake there.
                    >
                    > I did this yesterday but I cut 4 flats which then let me do the
                    > alignment using a square off the table. But to do two the first flat
                    > would be on the bottom when cutting the second flat and I can't think of
                    > as easy, accurate way to align that first cut so it's parallel to what
                    > will be the second cut. A gauge block with maybe using shims or feeler
                    > gauges so as to not lift the rod does comes to mind. Still may be if'y
                    > though on not lifting the rod.
                    >
                    > And since I made two cuts on each flat to dial it in if I machined a
                    > block it would be high for the first cut. Could make two blocks I guess
                    > but then that's not easy IMO making something to make something which
                    > might be a one time shot.
                    >
                    > Ideas?
                    >
                    >
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