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Re: [mill_drill] SKF bearing heads-up

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  • curt wuollet
    Until proven otherwise, I would assume that SKF quality standards apply regardless of where they were made. I have used SKF automotive bearings made in other
    Message 1 of 22 , Feb 28, 2011
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      Until proven otherwise, I would assume that SKF quality standards apply
      regardless of where they were made. I have used SKF automotive bearings
      made in other countries and that's a market where selling inferior bearings
      would be a remarkably short lived endeavor.

      Regards

      cww

      gmiller4396 wrote:
      > I recently received some SKF bearings that I ordered, and I didn't get what I thought I would.
      >
      > I have bought SKF bearings in the past, and they were all made in the USA. Not these bearings.
      >
      > I could have bought bearings at a lower price, knowing they would be made in Europe, but I opted to pay more and go with the ones I knew would be "good" bearings for sure, ones made here in the USA by SKF. I would pay extra for the peace of mind.
      >
      > Turns out, one of them is made in INDIA, of all places, and the other was made in Mexico.
      >
      > Looks like you can't trust what you will get from SKF anymore.
      >
      > If I had known this, I would have gone with the less expensive bearings made in Europe. Are the SKF bearings lower quality? Who knows, but paying more didn't get me anything more than I would have, if I had bought other non-USA bearings, although I would have saved some money and at least known where they were coming from.
      >
      > Mark
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • ejd1955
      Buying American and getting American is slowly going away. In order to compete in the world wide market, US manufacturers have been forced to turn to
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 1 6:45 AM
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        Buying American and getting American is slowly going away. In order to compete in the world wide market, US manufacturers have been forced to turn to outsourcing their manufacturing.

        When they do this, there are a lot of avenues available to them. The required level of quality dictates where they go to get their material. China, India and the rest have high end machine shops that are ISO certified and can make things just as good as a company in the US.

        This level of quality doesn't come for free. You don't take a farmer out of the field, put him on a worn out work center and get good parts. Skilled labor, good machines and following ISO guidelines makes the cost of manufacturing over there approach that in the states. At the current time, there is still a savings and a company like SKF does control things and we get the quality we expect from SKF.

        So, where does the junk come from? It comes from the low end shops running equipment bought for scrap in the US and put into use in a shop run by unskilled people. These shops exist because there is a large market for inexpensive parts and people are always looking to save money. If you set your target price low, you will have to accept a corresponding drop in quality. The cutters made in India were not the best India has to offer, they were the best that could be offered for the price they were being sold for.

        There is no doubt in my mind that there is an Indian tool company that could match the quality level of Iscar, Valenite, SGS and the rest, you just don't see them because their cost is not in your price range.

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Dan Mauch" <dmauch@...> wrote:
        >
        > It is amazing to me that India has not figured out how to improve their
        > quality. I too had a problem with some lathe cutters made in India. I
        > grabbed a 1/2" shank RH tool bit with a brazed insert on it just because it
        > was handy and the job was not critical. When I started to turn the part I
        > see the shank which only had about 1" out of the tool holder flexing even
        > with light cuts. For sure, that had to be the poorest steel I had seen. I
        > junked the cutters from India and installed a good quality US made cutter to
        > do the job.
        > Dan Mauch
        > dmauch@...
        > www.camtronics-cnc.com
        > stepper and servo motor
        > kits, assembled and custom Gecko systems.
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Bill Stietenroth
        > Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2011 10:14 AM
        > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [mill_drill] SKF bearing heads-up
        >
        > If it was my decision, I wouldn't put that bearing made in India in
        > anything. I have a couple of chucks made in India and they are really poorly
        > made from questionable material. They look like they were hand finished on a
        > bench grinder.
        >
        > Bill in Houston
        >
        > ---------- Original Message ----------
        > From: "gmiller4396" <gmiller4396@...>
        > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [mill_drill] SKF bearing heads-up
        > Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2011 15:31:31 -0000
        >
        > I recently received some SKF bearings that I ordered, and I didn't get what
        > I thought I would.
        >
        > I have bought SKF bearings in the past, and they were all made in the USA.
        > Not these bearings.
        >
        > I could have bought bearings at a lower price, knowing they would be made in
        > Europe, but I opted to pay more and go with the ones I knew would be "good"
        > bearings for sure, ones made here in the USA by SKF. I would pay extra for
        > the peace of mind.
        >
        > Turns out, one of them is made in INDIA, of all places, and the other was
        > made in Mexico.
        >
        > Looks like you can't trust what you will get from SKF anymore.
        >
        > If I had known this, I would have gone with the less expensive bearings made
        > in Europe. Are the SKF bearings lower quality? Who knows, but paying more
        > didn't get me anything more than I would have, if I had bought other non-USA
        > bearings, although I would have saved some money and at least known where
        > they were coming from.
        >
        > Mark
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
      • Lyn
        I have actually toured the SKF ball bearing plant in Pune, India about 8 years ago. The factory was world class and I have no questions about the quality of
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 1 6:49 PM
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          I have actually toured the SKF ball bearing plant in Pune, India about 8 years ago. The factory was world class and I have no questions about the quality of the bearings. At the time, I believe they were using European steel since they couldn't find bearing steel with high enough quality in India. They also were importing the balls from Europe. So I guess it was just "assembled with pride in India". I would guess that the steel is from India now.

          I wouldn't worry about Chinese made Timkin bearings or India made SKF bearings. Its the brands like "Wang Fung Bearing" and "Baharat bearing" that I would worry about.


          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "gmiller4396" <gmiller4396@...> wrote:
          >
          > I recently received some SKF bearings that I ordered, and I didn't get what I thought I would.
          >
          > I have bought SKF bearings in the past, and they were all made in the USA. Not these bearings.
          >
          > I could have bought bearings at a lower price, knowing they would be made in Europe, but I opted to pay more and go with the ones I knew would be "good" bearings for sure, ones made here in the USA by SKF. I would pay extra for the peace of mind.
          >
          > Turns out, one of them is made in INDIA, of all places, and the other was made in Mexico.
          >
          > Looks like you can't trust what you will get from SKF anymore.
          >
          > If I had known this, I would have gone with the less expensive bearings made in Europe. Are the SKF bearings lower quality? Who knows, but paying more didn't get me anything more than I would have, if I had bought other non-USA bearings, although I would have saved some money and at least known where they were coming from.
          >
          > Mark
          >
        • Stan Stocker
          ... I think you ve got it right in this. Years ago I worked with a gent from India who had owned a machine shop and had run numerous other shops while still
          Message 4 of 22 , Mar 1 8:27 PM
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            On 03/01/2011 09:49 PM, Lyn wrote:
            > I have actually toured the SKF ball bearing plant in Pune, India about 8 years ago. The factory was world class and I have no questions about the quality of the bearings. At the time, I believe they were using European steel since they couldn't find bearing steel with high enough quality in India. They also were importing the balls from Europe. So I guess it was just "assembled with pride in India". I would guess that the steel is from India now.
            >
            > I wouldn't worry about Chinese made Timkin bearings or India made SKF bearings. Its the brands like "Wang Fung Bearing" and "Baharat bearing" that I would worry about.
            >
            I think you've got it right in this. Years ago I worked with a gent
            from India who had owned a machine shop and had run numerous other shops
            while still living there. He had a contract with John Deere to make
            shafts for certain machines. Very tight specs, hairy tight finish and
            heat treat requirements. All was well until Deere took a bid from
            China. Left him high and dry, Deere got screwed on both quality (from
            day one) and price (three months later when the PRC gov't canceled the
            subsidies), and came back six months later looking to have him do the
            work again. They were somewhat in a bind, as these shafts went into
            drive line components in the really big Deere stuff, and the PRC ones
            were snapping like rice crispies. He'd just finished selling most of
            the very high end tooling for this work, and figured they would just
            repeat the cycle over again, so he told them to get stuffed.

            While the above has more to do with cheap short sighted business
            practices by John Deere, I did take advantage of working with him to ask
            what machines / tooling / supplies were good from India. I figured
            there had to be good stuff available, just as there is in China, you
            just have to know about it. He pretty much said that none of the stuff
            was any good, and that the only Indian made stuff in any shop he ran was
            the final product, him, and the workers.

            Sort of interesting as his opinion can hardly be considered to be first
            world snobbishness :-) About the only snobbishness I ever heard him
            utter was "Valanite or Iscar only". It also points out that there are
            shops in India doing high quality work, but just like anywhere else it's
            shop by shop, customer by customer, and case by case.

            Cheers,
            Stan
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