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Now what?

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  • john moore
    Hi All I ve been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 30, 2011
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      Hi All
      I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
    • Rick Sparber
      John, Welcome to the club . We are really all noobies but some have been at it longer than others. I never did find a decent Dummies book but offer the
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 30, 2011
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        John,

        Welcome to the "club". We are really all noobies but some have been at it
        longer than others. I never did find a decent "Dummies" book but offer the
        collection of things I've learned over the years:

        http://rick.sparber.org/ma.htm

        This material many not be good, but it is cheap ;-))

        Post your questions, there will be plenty of answers. With luck, at least
        two of them will agree.

        Best of luck,

        Rick

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of john moore
        Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 6:38 PM
        To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [mill_drill] Now what?

        Hi All
        I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible,
        vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill
        yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and
        start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in
        excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be
        similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an
        enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars,
        parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't
        identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually
        caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal
        clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any
        recommendations for a newbie?
      • curt wuollet
        A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals on machining. They appear to be written so even those who were volunteered to be machinists could read
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 30, 2011
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          A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
          on machining. They appear to be written so even those
          who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
          Someone here probably has the numbers.

          Regards

          cww


          john moore wrote:
          > Hi All
          > I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • john moore
          Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I ll be there for a while. Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for US Army manuals on machining found a 300+ page
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 30, 2011
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            Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.

            Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+ page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication that seems to be right up my alley.


            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, curt wuollet <wideopen1@...> wrote:
            >
            > A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
            > on machining. They appear to be written so even those
            > who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
            > Someone here probably has the numbers.
            >
            > Regards
            >
            > cww
            >
            >
            > john moore wrote:
            > > Hi All
            > > I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Goran Hosinsky
            Milling a complete course by Harold Hall ISBN 978-1-85486-232-7 in the Workshop Practice Series from Special Interest Model Books. Starts off with the basics,
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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              Milling a complete course by Harold Hall ISBN 978-1-85486-232-7 in the
              Workshop Practice Series from Special Interest Model Books.

              Starts off with the basics, making T-nuts and parallels and stuff to
              learn the groundwork. Goes on making a boring head, dividing head and a
              grinding head with a lot of fixtures for end mills etc. I have only
              reached the parallels stage so I cannot vouch for the later part of the
              book, but so far I am content.

              Goran
              Canary Islands

              On 2011-01-31 01:38, john moore wrote:
              > dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear<G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
              >
              >
            • mattdbartlett
              Here is the LMS mini mill guide. It should be enough to get your feet wet. The army manual that others have recommended is also good. The central machinery
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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                Here is the LMS mini mill guide. It should be enough to get your feet wet. The army manual that others have recommended is also good.

                The central machinery stuff is from Harbor Freight as I recall, but they are mostly the same between manufacturers other than accessories and paint color.

                Once you identify what you have, the folks on this list can probably give you a good idea of what you can do with it.

                -Matt

                --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "john moore" <jmoore8733@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi All
                > I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                >
              • thunderclaw007
                There are several good areas to start looking. If you want a quick idea of some projects to whet your appetite, than look at this site:
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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                  There are several good areas to start looking. If you want a quick idea of some projects to whet your appetite, than look at this site: http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html He has pictures of the projects to try working on to get comfortable.

                  You have already found Rick Sparber's site and it has a lot of tips and hints written in an easy to understand format.

                  If you are looking for some temporary free software to get you started with depths of cut, speed, feed, mill flex, etc. You could try gwizard SW at http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html. If you want the same information in a more technical paper format, purchase the Machinery Handbook by Industrial Press. I think they are up to version 28 now. The magazines Machinist Workshop and Home Shop Machinist are both good publications that put out different projects each month to work on with more step by step details. They are put out and have a free issue you can get to see if you like them. http://www.homeshopmachinist.net

                  The Workshop Practice Series are good little books Usually 120 to 150 pgs. I think there are currently 44 books in the series, they have been coming out since the mid 80's and the cheapest place I have found to buy them is at http://www.bookdepository.com for about 8 or 9 dollars each. You can usually get free shipping but coming from England, they can take some time to get through customs.

                  Finally, another good place to look for projects you might want to play with is http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/news/article_sort.htm They have a bunch of articles they have been archiving since the 1990's.

                  I hope this helps put you in right direction. I know I have had years of fun playing with things.

                  Bob

                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "john moore" <jmoore8733@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.
                  >
                  > Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+ page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication that seems to be right up my alley.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, curt wuollet <wideopen1@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
                  > > on machining. They appear to be written so even those
                  > > who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
                  > > Someone here probably has the numbers.
                  > >
                  > > Regards
                  > >
                  > > cww
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > john moore wrote:
                  > > > Hi All
                  > > > I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > ------------------------------------
                  > > >
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Paul Alciatore
                  What now? The best way to learn is to make some chips. Seriously. Make chips. Caution: Do wear eye protection. Milling cutters, especially end mills, CAN
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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                    What now? 

                    The best way to learn is to make some chips.  Seriously.  Make chips. 

                    Caution: Do wear eye protection.  Milling cutters, especially end mills, CAN BREAK and go flying.  ALWAYS USE EYE PROTECTION.  No matter how experienced you become, USE EYE PROTECTION. 

                    Grab a block of aluminum and an end mill.  Clamp the aluminum down or put it in a milling vise and go at it.  You can start by squaring the block up - make four nice sides then rotate it and go for six.  Go easy at first, light depth of cut (how much you take off) and slow speed on the feed.  Do use some cutting fluid: WD-40 works well for aluminum.  Just spray or drip it on every few seconds.  Watch for chip pile up - keep the cutter fairly clear by spraying the cutting fluid at it. 

                    Get the feel of it.  After you can get the block squared, then try to make it a particular size.  Then use a end cutting end mill and plunge in like drilling.  Hog out an opening in the middle.  Make it a particular size.  Now drill some holes in it.  Be careful not to drill into the vise - use spacers below the work. 

                    Take it out and put it back in.  Now use an edge finder to locate it.  Make another cut to verify that you have correctly located it. 

                    If you have done the above, you have now learned 75% of the basics.  Now you can start to worry about things like speeds and feeds for efficiency.  And other techniques.  But you have successfully cut metal.  Stand back, look, and be proud.  Feel empowered.

                    Keep going.  It's fun. 

                    Paul A.



                    At 01:14 PM 1/31/2011, you wrote:
                     

                    There are several good areas to start looking. If you want a quick idea of some projects to whet your appetite, than look at this site: http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html He has pictures of the projects to try working on to get comfortable.

                    You have already found Rick Sparber's site and it has a lot of tips and hints written in an easy to understand format.

                    If you are looking for some temporary free software to get you started with depths of cut, speed, feed, mill flex, etc. You could try gwizard SW at http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html. If you want the same information in a more technical paper format, purchase the Machinery Handbook by Industrial Press. I think they are up to version 28 now. The magazines Machinist Workshop and Home Shop Machinist are both good publications that put out different projects each month to work on with more step by step details. They are put out and have a free issue you can get to see if you like them. http://www.homeshopmachinist.net

                    The Workshop Practice Series are good little books Usually 120 to 150 pgs. I think there are currently 44 books in the series, they have been coming out since the mid 80's and the cheapest place I have found to buy them is at http://www.bookdepository.com for about 8 or 9 dollars each. You can usually get free shipping but coming from England, they can take some time to get through customs.

                    Finally, another good place to look for projects you might want to play with is http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/news/article_sort.htm They have a bunch of articles they have been archiving since the 1990's.

                    I hope this helps put you in right direction. I know I have had years of fun playing with things.

                    Bob

                    --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "john moore" <jmoore8733@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.
                    >
                    > Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+ page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication that seems to be right up my alley.
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, curt wuollet <wideopen1@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
                    > > on machining. They appear to be written so even those
                    > > who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
                    > > Someone here probably has the numbers.
                    > >
                    > > Regards
                    > >
                    > > cww
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > john moore wrote:
                    > > > Hi All
                    > > > I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > ------------------------------------
                    > > >
                    > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >

                  • yahoogroups
                    Thanks Paul, That s some of the best advice I ve seen lately. Cuts straight to the heart of the matter, and eloquently so. Bravo! Please keep it coming.
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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                      Thanks Paul,
                      That's some of the best advice I've seen lately. Cuts straight
                      to the heart of the matter, and eloquently so. Bravo! Please
                      keep it coming.

                      Fergus


                      > What now?
                      >
                      > The best way to learn is to make some chips. Seriously. Make chips.
                      >
                      > Caution: Do wear eye protection. Milling
                      > cutters, especially end mills, CAN BREAK and go
                      > flying. ALWAYS USE EYE PROTECTION. No matter
                      > how experienced you become, USE EYE PROTECTION.
                      >
                      > Grab a block of aluminum and an end mill. Clamp
                      > the aluminum down or put it in a milling vise and
                      > go at it. You can start by squaring the block up
                      > - make four nice sides then rotate it and go for
                      > six. Go easy at first, light depth of cut (how
                      > much you take off) and slow speed on the
                      > feed. Do use some cutting fluid: WD-40 works
                      > well for aluminum. Just spray or drip it on
                      > every few seconds. Watch for chip pile up - keep
                      > the cutter fairly clear by spraying the cutting fluid at it.
                      >
                      > Get the feel of it. After you can get the block
                      > squared, then try to make it a particular
                      > size. Then use a end cutting end mill and plunge
                      > in like drilling. Hog out an opening in the
                      > middle. Make it a particular size. Now drill
                      > some holes in it. Be careful not to drill into
                      > the vise - use spacers below the work.
                      >
                      > Take it out and put it back in. Now use an edge
                      > finder to locate it. Make another cut to verify
                      > that you have correctly located it.
                      >
                      > If you have done the above, you have now learned
                      > 75% of the basics. Now you can start to worry
                      > about things like speeds and feeds for
                      > efficiency. And other techniques. But you have
                      > successfully cut metal. Stand back, look, and be proud. Feel
                      > empowered.
                      >
                      > Keep going. It's fun.
                      >
                      > Paul A.
                    • curt wuollet
                      I don t have the problem of what to make, there s usually something broken at any given time. This morning I had to make a new agitator for my pellet stove. I
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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                        I don't have the problem of what to make, there's usually
                        something broken at any given time. This morning I had to
                        make a new agitator for my pellet stove. I start with a
                        5/8" bar of stainless steel 10 inches long. I turn it
                        down to .5" for 3 inches on one end and 1 inch on the
                        other. Then I mill flats on the long end and drill 5
                        .25" holes with 1.2" spacing through the fat part.
                        These take 1/4-20 stainless steel bolts with a stack of
                        4 SS nuts on the other side for the pegs.
                        Drill a .0625 hole in the center of the flats for a pin
                        and I'm done. Before it's cold from the drilling, it's
                        in the stove and cranking, because it's cold without the
                        stove. On to the next project. It's a $60 part from the
                        manufacturer and they'll send it in a week or so, if they
                        feel like it. I use about 5 a year and it's already paid
                        for the lathe and mill drill. Well....almost:^), for sure
                        if you value the downtime.

                        Regards

                        cww

                        john moore wrote:
                        > Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.
                        >
                        > Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+ page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication that seems to be right up my alley.
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, curt wuollet <wideopen1@...> wrote:
                        >> A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
                        >> on machining. They appear to be written so even those
                        >> who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
                        >> Someone here probably has the numbers.
                        >>
                        >> Regards
                        >>
                        >> cww
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> john moore wrote:
                        >>> Hi All
                        >>> I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>> ------------------------------------
                        >>>
                        >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • mbellar@aol.com
                        Visit _http://techtv.mit.edu/collections/ehs-videos/videos_ (http://techtv.mit.edu/collections/ehs-videos/videos) Tom In a message dated 1/31/2011 5:33:34 P.M.
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jan 31, 2011
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                          Tom
                           
                          In a message dated 1/31/2011 5:33:34 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, wideopen1@... writes:
                           

                          I don't have the problem of what to make, there's usually
                          something broken at any given time. This morning I had to
                          make a new agitator for my pellet stove. I start with a
                          5/8" bar of stainless steel 10 inches long. I turn it
                          down to .5" for 3 inches on one end and 1 inch on the
                          other. Then I mill flats on the long end and drill 5
                          .25" holes with 1.2" spacing through the fat part.
                          These take 1/4-20 stainless steel bolts with a stack of
                          4 SS nuts on the other side for the pegs.
                          Drill a .0625 hole in the center of the flats for a pin
                          and I'm done. Before it's cold from the drilling, it's
                          in the stove and cranking, because it's cold without the
                          stove. On to the next project. It's a $60 part from the
                          manufacturer and they'll send it in a week or so, if they
                          feel like it. I use about 5 a year and it's already paid
                          for the lathe and mill drill. Well....almost:^), for sure
                          if you value the downtime.

                          Regards

                          cww

                          john moore wrote:
                          > Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.
                          >
                          > Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+ page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication that seems to be right up my alley.
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, curt wuollet <wideopen1@...> wrote:
                          >> A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
                          >> on machining. They appear to be written so even those
                          >> who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
                          >> Someone here probably has the numbers.
                          >>
                          >> Regards
                          >>
                          >> cww
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> john moore wrote:
                          >>> Hi All
                          >>> I've been lurking here for some time trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring off all your wisdom and experience . I finally found a mill/drill yesterday and am very anxious to get it off the truck and into the shop and start making stuff. It's a Central Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in excellent shape, with everything tight and smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets, mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps, hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little like the dog that actually caught the car. What now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>> ------------------------------------
                          >>>
                          >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >

                        • john moore
                          Hey! You guys are full of it! Good advice, that is. The MIT videos are just what I needed. Lots of basic questions answered. I got the machine off the
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 6, 2011
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                            Hey! You guys are full of it! Good advice, that is. The MIT videos are just what I needed. Lots of basic questions answered. I got the machine off the truck and into the shop without incident (!?) Cleaned it up and went for it. There's more to making a cube than meets the eye and I'm still fine tuning it, although it's getting kinda small <g>. The machine seems to work as advertised, near as I can tell, except for the base, which is pure cheese. Seems like something a large ham would be packaged in. Is there a standard plan/model/rule for mill/drill bases? I've ordered a few collets, some parallels, edge finder and a fly cutter for a start. What else that I'm unaware of will I find essential?
                            Thanks
                            John in Arroyo Grande


                            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Paul Alciatore <palciatore@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > What now?
                            >
                            > The best way to learn is to make some chips. Seriously. Make chips.
                            >
                            > Caution: Do wear eye protection. Milling
                            > cutters, especially end mills, CAN BREAK and go
                            > flying. ALWAYS USE EYE PROTECTION. No matter
                            > how experienced you become, USE EYE PROTECTION.
                            >
                            > Grab a block of aluminum and an end mill. Clamp
                            > the aluminum down or put it in a milling vise and
                            > go at it. You can start by squaring the block up
                            > - make four nice sides then rotate it and go for
                            > six. Go easy at first, light depth of cut (how
                            > much you take off) and slow speed on the
                            > feed. Do use some cutting fluid: WD-40 works
                            > well for aluminum. Just spray or drip it on
                            > every few seconds. Watch for chip pile up - keep
                            > the cutter fairly clear by spraying the cutting fluid at it.
                            >
                            > Get the feel of it. After you can get the block
                            > squared, then try to make it a particular
                            > size. Then use a end cutting end mill and plunge
                            > in like drilling. Hog out an opening in the
                            > middle. Make it a particular size. Now drill
                            > some holes in it. Be careful not to drill into
                            > the vise - use spacers below the work.
                            >
                            > Take it out and put it back in. Now use an edge
                            > finder to locate it. Make another cut to verify
                            > that you have correctly located it.
                            >
                            > If you have done the above, you have now learned
                            > 75% of the basics. Now you can start to worry
                            > about things like speeds and feeds for
                            > efficiency. And other techniques. But you have
                            > successfully cut metal. Stand back, look, and be proud. Feel empowered.
                            >
                            > Keep going. It's fun.
                            >
                            > Paul A.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > At 01:14 PM 1/31/2011, you wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >There are several good areas to start looking.
                            > >If you want a quick idea of some projects to
                            > >whet your appetite, than look at this site:
                            > ><http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html>http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html
                            > >He has pictures of the projects to try working on to get comfortable.
                            > >
                            > >You have already found Rick Sparber's site and
                            > >it has a lot of tips and hints written in an easy to understand format.
                            > >
                            > >If you are looking for some temporary free
                            > >software to get you started with depths of cut,
                            > >speed, feed, mill flex, etc. You could try
                            > >gwizard SW at
                            > ><http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html.>http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html.
                            > >If you want the same information in a more
                            > >technical paper format, purchase the Machinery
                            > >Handbook by Industrial Press. I think they are
                            > >up to version 28 now. The magazines Machinist
                            > >Workshop and Home Shop Machinist are both good
                            > >publications that put out different projects
                            > >each month to work on with more step by step
                            > >details. They are put out and have a free issue
                            > >you can get to see if you like them.
                            > ><http://www.homeshopmachinist.net>http://www.homeshopmachinist.net
                            > >
                            > >The Workshop Practice Series are good little
                            > >books Usually 120 to 150 pgs. I think there are
                            > >currently 44 books in the series, they have been
                            > >coming out since the mid 80's and the cheapest
                            > >place I have found to buy them is at
                            > ><http://www.bookdepository.com>http://www.bookdepository.com
                            > >for about 8 or 9 dollars each. You can usually
                            > >get free shipping but coming from England, they
                            > >can take some time to get through customs.
                            > >
                            > >Finally, another good place to look for projects
                            > >you might want to play with is
                            > ><http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/news/article_sort.htm>http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/news/article_sort.htm
                            > >They have a bunch of articles they have been archiving since the 1990's.
                            > >
                            > >I hope this helps put you in right direction. I
                            > >know I have had years of fun playing with things.
                            > >
                            > >Bob
                            > >
                            > >--- In
                            > ><mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com>mill_drill@yahoogroups.com,
                            > >"john moore" <jmoore8733@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.
                            > > >
                            > > > Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for
                            > > "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+
                            > > page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine
                            > > Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication
                            > > that seems to be right up my alley.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In
                            > > <mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com>mill_drill@yahoogroups.com,
                            > > curt wuollet <wideopen1@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
                            > > > > on machining. They appear to be written so even those
                            > > > > who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
                            > > > > Someone here probably has the numbers.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Regards
                            > > > >
                            > > > > cww
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > john moore wrote:
                            > > > > > Hi All
                            > > > > > I've been lurking here for some time
                            > > trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring
                            > > off all your wisdom and experience . I finally
                            > > found a mill/drill yesterday and am very
                            > > anxious to get it off the truck and into the
                            > > shop and start making stuff. It's a Central
                            > > Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in
                            > > excellent shape, with everything tight and
                            > > smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a
                            > > Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got
                            > > an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets,
                            > > mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps,
                            > > hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't
                            > > identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little
                            > > like the dog that actually caught the car. What
                            > > now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become
                            > > crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for
                            > > Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > ------------------------------------
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • clumsysoftballerz
                            Congratulations! I m not much ahead of you- got my x3 less then a month ago. Biggest essentials are measuring equipment. Dual test indicator, holder and
                            Message 13 of 13 , Feb 7, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Congratulations! I'm not much ahead of you- got my x3 less then a month ago. Biggest essentials are measuring equipment. Dual test indicator, holder and machinest squares. I'm quickly learning that you get what you pay for on some items. My cheap center/edge finder has a tiny burr that prevents me from using it like the mit video to locate a punch mark, but I am loving those videos! Loaded 1-5 on my phone and watched them all this weekend now I just loaded 6-10.

                              my x3 had been a labor intensive honeymoon- mounted all the readouts outs, found free mdf I cut up to make the stand off, poured a bucket of cement this weekend, braced a couple of 2x6's across the roof to hang pulleys and cement from to counter weight the head, built what I believe is one if the only hand held power feeds for my z... Its funny... Bought this to produce parts and haven't even started trying yet. Still need to tram my column which is .0095 off to the right and .0035 off to the front. Ordered .0005 & .001 shims from mcmaster this morning and hope to have everything done by this weekend.

                              Btw: igaging remote digital scales only ended up costing my less than $200 and are the best thing possible for accuracy and repeatability (for the money). Its no DRO but its a million times better than dials. They were easy to cut and easy to mount. Planning on doing a full write up after I have some parts done to verify the initial accuracy readings I'm getting



                              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "john moore" <jmoore8733@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hey! You guys are full of it! Good advice, that is. The MIT videos are just what I needed. Lots of basic questions answered. I got the machine off the truck and into the shop without incident (!?) Cleaned it up and went for it. There's more to making a cube than meets the eye and I'm still fine tuning it, although it's getting kinda small <g>. The machine seems to work as advertised, near as I can tell, except for the base, which is pure cheese. Seems like something a large ham would be packaged in. Is there a standard plan/model/rule for mill/drill bases? I've ordered a few collets, some parallels, edge finder and a fly cutter for a start. What else that I'm unaware of will I find essential?
                              > Thanks
                              > John in Arroyo Grande
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Paul Alciatore <palciatore@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > What now?
                              > >
                              > > The best way to learn is to make some chips. Seriously. Make chips.
                              > >
                              > > Caution: Do wear eye protection. Milling
                              > > cutters, especially end mills, CAN BREAK and go
                              > > flying. ALWAYS USE EYE PROTECTION. No matter
                              > > how experienced you become, USE EYE PROTECTION.
                              > >
                              > > Grab a block of aluminum and an end mill. Clamp
                              > > the aluminum down or put it in a milling vise and
                              > > go at it. You can start by squaring the block up
                              > > - make four nice sides then rotate it and go for
                              > > six. Go easy at first, light depth of cut (how
                              > > much you take off) and slow speed on the
                              > > feed. Do use some cutting fluid: WD-40 works
                              > > well for aluminum. Just spray or drip it on
                              > > every few seconds. Watch for chip pile up - keep
                              > > the cutter fairly clear by spraying the cutting fluid at it.
                              > >
                              > > Get the feel of it. After you can get the block
                              > > squared, then try to make it a particular
                              > > size. Then use a end cutting end mill and plunge
                              > > in like drilling. Hog out an opening in the
                              > > middle. Make it a particular size. Now drill
                              > > some holes in it. Be careful not to drill into
                              > > the vise - use spacers below the work.
                              > >
                              > > Take it out and put it back in. Now use an edge
                              > > finder to locate it. Make another cut to verify
                              > > that you have correctly located it.
                              > >
                              > > If you have done the above, you have now learned
                              > > 75% of the basics. Now you can start to worry
                              > > about things like speeds and feeds for
                              > > efficiency. And other techniques. But you have
                              > > successfully cut metal. Stand back, look, and be proud. Feel empowered.
                              > >
                              > > Keep going. It's fun.
                              > >
                              > > Paul A.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > At 01:14 PM 1/31/2011, you wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >There are several good areas to start looking.
                              > > >If you want a quick idea of some projects to
                              > > >whet your appetite, than look at this site:
                              > > ><http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html>http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html
                              > > >He has pictures of the projects to try working on to get comfortable.
                              > > >
                              > > >You have already found Rick Sparber's site and
                              > > >it has a lot of tips and hints written in an easy to understand format.
                              > > >
                              > > >If you are looking for some temporary free
                              > > >software to get you started with depths of cut,
                              > > >speed, feed, mill flex, etc. You could try
                              > > >gwizard SW at
                              > > ><http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html.>http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html.
                              > > >If you want the same information in a more
                              > > >technical paper format, purchase the Machinery
                              > > >Handbook by Industrial Press. I think they are
                              > > >up to version 28 now. The magazines Machinist
                              > > >Workshop and Home Shop Machinist are both good
                              > > >publications that put out different projects
                              > > >each month to work on with more step by step
                              > > >details. They are put out and have a free issue
                              > > >you can get to see if you like them.
                              > > ><http://www.homeshopmachinist.net>http://www.homeshopmachinist.net
                              > > >
                              > > >The Workshop Practice Series are good little
                              > > >books Usually 120 to 150 pgs. I think there are
                              > > >currently 44 books in the series, they have been
                              > > >coming out since the mid 80's and the cheapest
                              > > >place I have found to buy them is at
                              > > ><http://www.bookdepository.com>http://www.bookdepository.com
                              > > >for about 8 or 9 dollars each. You can usually
                              > > >get free shipping but coming from England, they
                              > > >can take some time to get through customs.
                              > > >
                              > > >Finally, another good place to look for projects
                              > > >you might want to play with is
                              > > ><http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/news/article_sort.htm>http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/news/article_sort.htm
                              > > >They have a bunch of articles they have been archiving since the 1990's.
                              > > >
                              > > >I hope this helps put you in right direction. I
                              > > >know I have had years of fun playing with things.
                              > > >
                              > > >Bob
                              > > >
                              > > >--- In
                              > > ><mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com>mill_drill@yahoogroups.com,
                              > > >"john moore" <jmoore8733@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Thanks to Rick. Your site is awesome! I'll be there for a while.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Thanks for the tip Curt. A quick search for
                              > > > "US Army manuals on machining" found a 300+
                              > > > page pdf titled "Fundamentals of Machine
                              > > > Tools". A 1996 Dept. of the Army publication
                              > > > that seems to be right up my alley.
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > --- In
                              > > > <mailto:mill_drill%40yahoogroups.com>mill_drill@yahoogroups.com,
                              > > > curt wuollet <wideopen1@> wrote:
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > A good newbie book is to hunt down the US Army manuals
                              > > > > > on machining. They appear to be written so even those
                              > > > > > who were volunteered to be machinists could read them.
                              > > > > > Someone here probably has the numbers.
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > Regards
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > cww
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > john moore wrote:
                              > > > > > > Hi All
                              > > > > > > I've been lurking here for some time
                              > > > trying to learn as much as possible, vampiring
                              > > > off all your wisdom and experience . I finally
                              > > > found a mill/drill yesterday and am very
                              > > > anxious to get it off the truck and into the
                              > > > shop and start making stuff. It's a Central
                              > > > Machinery T2119/9970. It looks to be in
                              > > > excellent shape, with everything tight and
                              > > > smooth. appears to be similar/identical to a
                              > > > Grizzly G3358, near as I can tell. I also got
                              > > > an enormous 6" swivel vise, mess of collets,
                              > > > mills, offset boring bars, parallels, clamps,
                              > > > hold downs and a bunch of other stuff I haven't
                              > > > identified yet. I'm stoked! Yet I feel a little
                              > > > like the dog that actually caught the car. What
                              > > > now? What i DON'T know has suddenly become
                              > > > crystal clear <G>. Is there a "Mill/Drill for
                              > > > Dummies" book out there? Any recommendations for a newbie?
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > ------------------------------------
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
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