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Re: Round Column Mill Anti-rotation Modification

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  • Torsten
    Some call it a limitation, others see it as a advantage. There are benefits to been able to move the Head around. So I just look at it as a feature of the
    Message 1 of 44 , Dec 31, 2010
      Some call it a limitation, others see it as a advantage.
      There are benefits to been able to move the Head around.
      So I just look at it as a feature of the round colunm MillDrills.
      Best remedy is to avoid the problem in the first place by making sure your technic suits your situation, planing your work ahead of time will become second nature.
      In adition get yourself some suitable tooling, best to have them all at a similar length.
      Just cut those Reamers down to size and make them the same length as then other tools you use.
      A Set of short stub Drills or Machine Screw Drills will help a lot.
      Another great help for those times where you just can not avoid moving the head is to get your self a Probe.
      On a cnc'd machine you could write a Probing routine that can relocate your Setup in Seconds and is more precise then any of the other remedies.
      Good Luck


      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Sparber" <rgsparber@...> wrote:
      >
      > All machines have their limitations. I could afford to buy a small knee mill
      > yet am happy with my round column RF30.
      >
      > The trick, IMHO, is to figure out what you plan to do with a given machine
      > and then find a way to be happy with its limitations. Otherwise you will be
      > constantly upgrading to the next larger machine and never fully learning
      > what the one you have can do. Now, I have a few friends that freely admit to
      > be tool collectors and that is fine too. I think one of them has 4
      > Bridgeport mills and over 6 lathes.
      >
      > Rick
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of Bill Stietenroth
      > Sent: Friday, December 31, 2010 10:14 AM
      > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Round Column Mill Anti-rotation Modification
      >
      > About the only dead sure remedy for that problem is don't buy a round column
      > mill. Some have attached a laser level to the side of the head and put a
      > reference vertical line on the opposite wall of the shop to align with. I
      > just spend more time planning tool and operation useage and try not to have
      > to move the head. Use short tooling. Sometimes I just have to move it and
      > then realign. That is the major shortcoming of the machine. If it didn't
      > have that problem you wouldn't find them on the used market as much as you
      > do.
      >
      > Bill in Houston
      >
    • Bryan
      My G1005 lay in someones garage floor in pieces for years and was covered in paint spatters. I used Goof Off to remove it from the whole machine. The labels
      Message 44 of 44 , Feb 5, 2011
        My G1005 lay in someones garage floor in pieces for years and was covered in paint spatters. I used Goof Off to remove it from the whole machine. The labels survived with no wear and tear.
        The only place it didn't all come off was the black plastic around the on off switch.

        be

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Paul Alciatore <palciatore@...> wrote:
        >
        > It is hard to tell what kinds of original and
        > "over" paint are there. Paint remover may remove both.
        >
        > I would first try gentle scraping with something
        > like a fingernail or a plastic implement. If the
        > surface of the original paint was not properly
        > cleaned and prepared, it may flake off. After
        > that I would try paint remover applied for a
        > short interval. Perhaps you can control the
        > depth of removal by the time you allow it to soak
        > in. But this will probably not leave a nice
        > finish. Some form of abrasive polish may improve it.
        >
        > In the end, chances are you will need to replace
        > all or part of the original paint. Break out the
        > artist brushes. The above suggestions may allow
        > you to match the original colors.
        >
        > Paul A.
        >
        >
        >
        > At 06:38 PM 2/4/2011, you wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >I have an older piece of equipment that's been painted a time or two.
        > >One of the paint jobs covered up the emblems/nameplates on the machine.
        > >Has anyone had any luck removing the overpaint on a nameplate, while not
        > >removing the original paint on the nameplate?
        > >
        >
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