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Re: Cutting Oil

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  • RonCoffey
    I ve been machining for 38 years and something my father ( who I worked beside for 25 years) taught me was to use Crisco shortening (Lard) for tapping and
    Message 1 of 65 , Dec 7, 2010
      I've been machining for 38 years and something my father ( who I worked beside for 25 years) taught me was to use Crisco shortening (Lard) for tapping and moderate machining. Whats great about using it for tapping is it stays on the tap very well. What I liked about it in the shop was when there were several machinist using it through out the day it would smell like a movie theater lobby cooking popcorn! Give it a try if you haven't' already.

      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "ekdadlec" <ekadlec@...> wrote:
      >
      > Denis,
      >
      > That stinky cutting oil likely contains sulfur and is the best for getting a good finish on 1018 CRS which can be difficult to get a good finish on. So hang on to it and use it only when needed.
      > I use either one of these for most cutting:
      >
      > http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=943668&PMAKA=505-2013
      >
      > http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=943706&PMAKA=505-2008
      >
      > Not much smell to either one.
      >
      > Ed
      >
      > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "zapvss" <zapvss@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi All,
      > > What is the least smelly, smoky cutting oil to use with the Mill or Lathe?
      > >
      > > I bought the wrong stuff from True Value, it is labeled "Cutting Oil" but wow does it stink and really smokes. I guess it was made for cutting plumbling threads.
      > >
      > > Thanks
      > > Denis
      > >
      >
    • Snag
      ... Oh , it s not as sharp as it could be , and I knew that . I was more looking for comparisons with/without , and it does cut smoother with . Actually , I
      Message 65 of 65 , Dec 12, 2010
        Rick Sparber <rgsparber@...> wrote:
        > Snag,
        >
        > Sounds like it's time to look closely at the cutter. It must be razor
        > sharp, very smooth, and have about the right angles. IMHO, a properly
        > made cutter is far more important than what kind of cutting fluid, if
        > any, that you use.
        >
        > Rick

        Oh , it's not as sharp as it could be , and I knew that . I was more
        looking for comparisons with/without , and it does cut smoother with .
        Actually , I was just screwin' around after the wife went to bed . I've
        actually gotten pretty good at freehanding cutters , only thing I sometimes
        have problems with now is getting just the right nose radius . Especially
        when cutting 304 SS and other difficult materials it's a trade-off between
        chatter and a nice smooth finish . Since my lathe (Logan/Wards) has a plain
        apron that drives with the halfnuts , the finest feed I can go without
        downgearing (4:1 instead of 2:1) is .0044"/rev . Since I hate to change up
        the geartrain , I've been practicing getting that nose radius just right .
        Snag
        Learning keeps
        you young !
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