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Re: [mill_drill] newbie workholding question

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  • hkb176@yahoo.com
    Correct solution!! Use MDF and wear a dust mask. Jim D Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: picclock Sender:
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 2, 2010
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      Correct solution!! Use MDF and wear a dust mask.

      Jim D

      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


      From: "picclock" <mdare@...>
      Sender: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2010 22:12:27 -0000
      To: <mill_drill@yahoogroups.com>
      ReplyTo: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [mill_drill] newbie workholding question

       

      Hi

      I need to mill some 4mm aluminium sheet which needs to be clamped to keep it flat. Its too big for a vice which would not support it in the centre anyway.

      I have a 'proper' clamp set with T nuts and bits and pieces etc. However I can't clamp it directly to the table as the some of the slots I need to cut go through the material and the table would be damaged.

      Is there a 'right' way to do this ?. Best way I can think of at the moment is to sandwich a piece of mdf or wood under the sheet, then clamp and mill it.

      Any help much appreciated.

      Picclock

    • Stan Stocker
      Greetings, MDF is probably your best bet if you re not flooding on coolant and only have to make a few. The sides will be parallel and pretty close to flat
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 2, 2010
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        Greetings,

        MDF is probably your best bet if you're not flooding on coolant and only
        have to make a few. The sides will be parallel and pretty close to
        flat on clean new MDF.

        In some situations it makes sense to screw the work to the MDF, then
        clamp the MDF, in other cases just using the MDF as an expendable spacer
        works fine.

        Parallels can also be useful, but depending on the size of the work and
        the spacing required between parallels the 4mm thickness may flex too
        far to use them.

        If the work is really thin and large, sometimes you sandwich the work
        between sheets of MDF or ply and mill though the upper sheet, the work,
        and into the lower sheet. In the one off work, we usually have to
        settle for safe and successful before we get to elegant or graceful :-)
        Just can't recoup the cost of special fixtures unless there is just no
        other way to get the job done.

        If you have a number of these to knock out, making a spacer sheet of
        some 4+ mm aluminum can be useful. Drill locating holes for pins in the
        blank sheets, take one, and mill out oversize slots. You don't have to
        go through, you can go 3mm deep or so. Going oversize lets you have a
        little room of overshooting or slight alignment oops moments without
        generating scrap. Clamp the whole deal up and start slinging swarf. If
        the spacer is large enough, you can clamp or bolt it down separately and
        swap out the work pieces pretty quickly.

        Take care,
        Stan

        On 08/02/2010 06:12 PM, picclock wrote:
        > Hi
        >
        > I need to mill some 4mm aluminium sheet which needs to be clamped to keep it flat. Its too big for a vice which would not support it in the centre anyway.
        >
        > I have a 'proper' clamp set with T nuts and bits and pieces etc. However I can't clamp it directly to the table as the some of the slots I need to cut go through the material and the table would be damaged.
        >
        > Is there a 'right' way to do this ?. Best way I can think of at the moment is to sandwich a piece of mdf or wood under the sheet, then clamp and mill it.
        >
        > Any help much appreciated.
        >
        > Picclock
        >
        >
      • leonar d bristow
        Picclock, You can raise the work sheet using parralels, making sure that theyre not under where your cutting right through. If you need better accuracy than
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 2, 2010
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          Picclock,
          You can raise the work sheet using parralels, making sure that theyre not under where your cutting right through. If you need better accuracy than ply etc. I have found 1/8" perspex is very accurate. I buy cutoffs very cheaply and use them a lot. Also saves the mill table.
          lennard
           
           
           
           
           
           

          ------------------------------------------------------
          Provided by Australis
          http://www.australis.com.au/
        • Rick Sparber
          I agree. MDF is generally very useful stuff in my shop. Rick ... From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Stan Stocker
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 2, 2010
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            I agree. MDF is generally very useful stuff in my shop.

            Rick

            -----Original Message-----
            From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Stan Stocker
            Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 4:03 PM
            To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [mill_drill] newbie workholding question

            Greetings,

            MDF is probably your best bet if you're not flooding on coolant and only
            have to make a few. The sides will be parallel and pretty close to
            flat on clean new MDF.

            In some situations it makes sense to screw the work to the MDF, then
            clamp the MDF, in other cases just using the MDF as an expendable spacer
            works fine.

            Parallels can also be useful, but depending on the size of the work and
            the spacing required between parallels the 4mm thickness may flex too
            far to use them.

            If the work is really thin and large, sometimes you sandwich the work
            between sheets of MDF or ply and mill though the upper sheet, the work,
            and into the lower sheet. In the one off work, we usually have to
            settle for safe and successful before we get to elegant or graceful :-)
            Just can't recoup the cost of special fixtures unless there is just no
            other way to get the job done.

            If you have a number of these to knock out, making a spacer sheet of
            some 4+ mm aluminum can be useful. Drill locating holes for pins in the
            blank sheets, take one, and mill out oversize slots. You don't have to
            go through, you can go 3mm deep or so. Going oversize lets you have a
            little room of overshooting or slight alignment oops moments without
            generating scrap. Clamp the whole deal up and start slinging swarf. If
            the spacer is large enough, you can clamp or bolt it down separately and
            swap out the work pieces pretty quickly.

            Take care,
            Stan
          • picclock
            Thanks for the info. The Rick Sparber site has some good ideas, with some pictures even showing him using blocks of wood under the work, so I wasn t far off
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 2, 2010
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              Thanks for the info.

              The Rick Sparber site has some good ideas, with some pictures even showing him using blocks of wood under the work, so I wasn't far off (lucky guess).

              Best Regards

              picclock

              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Malcolm Parker-Lisberg <mparkerlisberg@...> wrote:
              >
              > Take a look at Rick Sparbers site:
              > <http://rick.sparber.org/Articles/tc.pdf>
              > And his general machining info at:
              > <http://rick.sparber.org/ma.htm>
              >
              > Malcolm
              >
              > I don't suffer from insanity I enjoy it!
              >
              > --- On Mon, 8/2/10, picclock <mdare@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: picclock <mdare@...>
              > Subject: [mill_drill] newbie workholding question
              > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Monday, August 2, 2010, 11:12 PM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Hi
              >
              >
              >
              > I need to mill some 4mm aluminium sheet which needs to be clamped to keep it flat. Its too big for a vice which would not support it in the centre anyway.
              >
              >
              >
              > I have a 'proper' clamp set with T nuts and bits and pieces etc. However I can't clamp it directly to the table as the some of the slots I need to cut go through the material and the table would be damaged.
              >
              >
              >
              > Is there a 'right' way to do this ?. Best way I can think of at the moment is to sandwich a piece of mdf or wood under the sheet, then clamp and mill it.
              >
              >
              >
              > Any help much appreciated.
              >
              >
              >
              > Picclock
              >
            • Rick Sparber
              Malcolm, Thanks for the plug but I think the best solution is an extension of what Picclock said. I would sandwich the metal between pieces of MDF, clamp, and
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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                Malcolm,

                 

                Thanks for the plug but I think the best solution is an extension of  what Picclock said. I would sandwich the metal between pieces of MDF, clamp, and mill right through the top piece of MDF. It would be messy but I can’t imagine a better support of the work.

                 

                Rick

                 

                From: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mill_drill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Malcolm Parker-Lisberg
                Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 3:57 PM
                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [mill_drill] newbie workholding question

                 




                Take a look at Rick Sparbers site:
                <http://rick.sparber.org/Articles/tc.pdf>
                And his general machining info at:
                <http://rick.sparber.org/ma.htm>

                Malcolm

                I don't suffer from insanity I enjoy it!

                --- On Mon, 8/2/10, picclock <mdare@...> wrote:


                From: picclock <mdare@...>
                Subject: [mill_drill] newbie workholding question
                To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, August 2, 2010, 11:12 PM

                 

                Hi

                I need to mill some 4mm aluminium sheet which needs to be clamped to keep it flat. Its too big for a vice which would not support it in the centre anyway.

                I have a 'proper' clamp set with T nuts and bits and pieces etc. However I can't clamp it directly to the table as the some of the slots I need to cut go through the material and the table would be damaged.

                Is there a 'right' way to do this ?. Best way I can think of at the moment is to sandwich a piece of mdf or wood under the sheet, then clamp and mill it.

                Any help much appreciated.

                Picclock

                 

              • EdwinB
                MDF will work with flood coolant as long as it isn t water-based coolant. I use a 50/50 mixture of odorless paint thinner and hydraulic fluid. It does not
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  MDF will work with flood coolant as long as it isn't water-based coolant. I use a 50/50 mixture of odorless paint thinner and hydraulic fluid. It does not cause any problems with MDF spacers.

                  Regards,
                  Ed

                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Stan Stocker <skstocker@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Greetings,
                  >
                  > MDF is probably your best bet if you're not flooding on coolant and only
                  > have to make a few. The sides will be parallel and pretty close to
                  > flat on clean new MDF.
                  >
                  > In some situations it makes sense to screw the work to the MDF, then
                  > clamp the MDF, in other cases just using the MDF as an expendable spacer
                  > works fine.
                  >
                  > Parallels can also be useful, but depending on the size of the work and
                  > the spacing required between parallels the 4mm thickness may flex too
                  > far to use them.
                  >
                  > If the work is really thin and large, sometimes you sandwich the work
                  > between sheets of MDF or ply and mill though the upper sheet, the work,
                  > and into the lower sheet. In the one off work, we usually have to
                  > settle for safe and successful before we get to elegant or graceful :-)
                  > Just can't recoup the cost of special fixtures unless there is just no
                  > other way to get the job done.
                  >
                  > If you have a number of these to knock out, making a spacer sheet of
                  > some 4+ mm aluminum can be useful. Drill locating holes for pins in the
                  > blank sheets, take one, and mill out oversize slots. You don't have to
                  > go through, you can go 3mm deep or so. Going oversize lets you have a
                  > little room of overshooting or slight alignment oops moments without
                  > generating scrap. Clamp the whole deal up and start slinging swarf. If
                  > the spacer is large enough, you can clamp or bolt it down separately and
                  > swap out the work pieces pretty quickly.
                  >
                  > Take care,
                  > Stan
                  >
                  > On 08/02/2010 06:12 PM, picclock wrote:
                  > > Hi
                  > >
                  > > I need to mill some 4mm aluminium sheet which needs to be clamped to keep it flat. Its too big for a vice which would not support it in the centre anyway.
                  > >
                  > > I have a 'proper' clamp set with T nuts and bits and pieces etc. However I can't clamp it directly to the table as the some of the slots I need to cut go through the material and the table would be damaged.
                  > >
                  > > Is there a 'right' way to do this ?. Best way I can think of at the moment is to sandwich a piece of mdf or wood under the sheet, then clamp and mill it.
                  > >
                  > > Any help much appreciated.
                  > >
                  > > Picclock
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
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