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Re: Proper paint for mill restoration

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  • C4C
    Bill, I m very familiar with Lab Metal. It is a non metallic substance which equates to a NON MAGNETIC substance. HINT: magnetic. Not only have I used Lab
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 11, 2010
      Bill,

      I'm very familiar with Lab Metal. It is a non metallic substance which equates to a NON MAGNETIC substance. HINT: magnetic. Not only have I used Lab Metal I have also paid for it and I'll guarantee you that it does not fall into the category of body filler.

      Believe me when I tell you that 'I HAVE BEEN THERE AND DONE THAT'.

      Please try again.

      C4C

      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "William Longyard" <longyard@...> wrote:
      >
      > C4C,
      >
      > Consider yourself "enlightened."
      >
      > http://www.alvinproducts.com/Products/Products.asp?id=2
      >
      > Bill Longyard
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: C4C
      > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:36 PM
      > Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Proper paint for mill restoration
      >
      >
      >
      > Bill,
      >
      > I'm very familiar with epoxies that are comprised of various medias, but I have never heard of polyester body filler that has metallic media in it.
      >
      > What would the purpose be for using it? Maybe so that it will rust out at the same rate as the already rusted metal around the rot hole that was repaired, no patched with bondo.
      >
      > Please enlighten me.
      >
      > C4C
      >
      > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "William Longyard" <longyard@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Powder coating CAN be done even with body filler IF you use a metalized body filler. Check with your powder coating for the proper type. An automotive paint store will sell it, too.
      > >
      > > Bill Longyard
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: C4C
      > > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:09 AM
      > > Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Proper paint for mill restoration
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Richard,
      > >
      > > You can rule out powder coating due to the necessity of surface preparation with bondo or epoxy filling material. As for paint I have used Krylon and I have used the more expensive catalyst paint. Believe it or not the Krylon was used on an Atlas Clausing lathe that I completely rebuilt including scraping the ways and the paint job outlived the bed ways. Is that to say that Krylon is a quality paint? No the Atlas Clausing did not have hardened bed ways the repetitive practice of cutting steel took it's toll on the bed ways. The key to a good paint job is the surface preparation. You will find that your RF30 is not very pretty with her clothes off.
      > >
      > > C4C
      > >
      > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "goyellowbike" <goyellowbike@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I was talking to Andy Newlands today, a bicycle builder and master machinist in Portland, OR, about a mill restoration he was starting, as I am currently cleaning up an old RF-30 myself, and he asked what sort of paint system I was using. We custom bicycle builders take our paint pretty seriously :>) so the question was no surprise. Fortunately for me, my mill pretty much just sat in a corner for years rusting and the paint is in great shape.
      > > >
      > > > So, after that long lead in, can anyone tell me what sort of paint system is used on heavy machinery these days? I considered powder coating, or one of the catalyst paints, but I'm just guessing.
      > > >
      > > > Oh yea, my "on-off" switch in on the fritz and so far the distributor and factory rep are really having a rough time locating a replacement for it! And I thought it was just an On-Off switch.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks for any info about the paint.
      > > >
      > > > Regards,
      > > >
      > > > Richard Long
      > > > Temecula, CA
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Stan Stocker
      HINT : Aluminum filled HINT: Alvin web site specifically calls out Lab Metal for use under powder coating. HINT: Powder coating is an electrostatic, not
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 11, 2010
        HINT : Aluminum filled

        HINT: Alvin web site specifically calls out Lab Metal for use under
        powder coating.

        HINT: Powder coating is an electrostatic, not magnetic process.

        HINT: Aluminum is what we civilized, polite humans call "metal". It's
        the stuff that when sold in hex bars doesn't get held well in four jaw
        chucks. Remember that rude little bit of flaming?

        Hint: You're not the only one around here that has a clue.

        Please try again.

        C4C wrote:
        > Bill,
        >
        > I'm very familiar with Lab Metal. It is a non metallic substance which equates to a NON MAGNETIC substance. HINT: magnetic. Not only have I used Lab Metal I have also paid for it and I'll guarantee you that it does not fall into the category of body filler.
        >
        > Believe me when I tell you that 'I HAVE BEEN THERE AND DONE THAT'.
        >
        > Please try again.
        >
        > C4C
        >
        >
      • William Longyard
        Is that C4C or S4B ? Bill Longyard ... From: Stan Stocker To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:15 PM Subject: Re:
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 11, 2010
          Is that "C4C" or "S4B"?
           
          Bill Longyard
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:15 PM
          Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: Proper paint for mill restoration

           

          HINT : Aluminum filled

          HINT: Alvin web site specifically calls out Lab Metal for use under
          powder coating.

          HINT: Powder coating is an electrostatic, not magnetic process.

          HINT: Aluminum is what we civilized, polite humans call "metal". It's
          the stuff that when sold in hex bars doesn't get held well in four jaw
          chucks. Remember that rude little bit of flaming?

          Hint: You're not the only one around here that has a clue.

          Please try again.

          C4C wrote:
          > Bill,
          >
          > I'm very familiar with Lab Metal. It is a non metallic substance which equates to a NON MAGNETIC substance. HINT: magnetic. Not only have I used Lab Metal I have also paid for it and I'll guarantee you that it does not fall into the category of body filler.
          >
          > Believe me when I tell you that 'I HAVE BEEN THERE AND DONE THAT'.
          >
          > Please try again.
          >
          > C4C
          >
          >

        • C4C
          Bill, Stan, Damn I hate it when I m wrong, but I ll suck it up and wait for the next argument to come along. C4C
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 11, 2010
            Bill, Stan,

            Damn I hate it when I'm wrong, but I'll suck it up and wait for the next argument to come along.

            C4C

            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "William Longyard" <longyard@...> wrote:
            >
            > Is that "C4C" or "S4B"?
            >
            > Bill Longyard
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Stan Stocker
            > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:15 PM
            > Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: Proper paint for mill restoration
            >
            >
            >
            > HINT : Aluminum filled
            >
            > HINT: Alvin web site specifically calls out Lab Metal for use under
            > powder coating.
            >
            > HINT: Powder coating is an electrostatic, not magnetic process.
            >
            > HINT: Aluminum is what we civilized, polite humans call "metal". It's
            > the stuff that when sold in hex bars doesn't get held well in four jaw
            > chucks. Remember that rude little bit of flaming?
            >
            > Hint: You're not the only one around here that has a clue.
            >
            > Please try again.
            >
            > C4C wrote:
            > > Bill,
            > >
            > > I'm very familiar with Lab Metal. It is a non metallic substance which equates to a NON MAGNETIC substance. HINT: magnetic. Not only have I used Lab Metal I have also paid for it and I'll guarantee you that it does not fall into the category of body filler.
            > >
            > > Believe me when I tell you that 'I HAVE BEEN THERE AND DONE THAT'.
            > >
            > > Please try again.
            > >
            > > C4C
            > >
            > >
            >
          • C4C
            Bill, Real cute -- S4B. I didn t catch on to that until after I had send my reply. C4C
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 11, 2010
              Bill,

              Real cute --> S4B. I didn't catch on to that until after I had send my reply.

              C4C

              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "William Longyard" <longyard@...> wrote:
              >
              > Is that "C4C" or "S4B"?
              >
              > Bill Longyard
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Stan Stocker
              > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:15 PM
              > Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: Proper paint for mill restoration
              >
              >
              >
              > HINT : Aluminum filled
              >
              > HINT: Alvin web site specifically calls out Lab Metal for use under
              > powder coating.
              >
              > HINT: Powder coating is an electrostatic, not magnetic process.
              >
              > HINT: Aluminum is what we civilized, polite humans call "metal". It's
              > the stuff that when sold in hex bars doesn't get held well in four jaw
              > chucks. Remember that rude little bit of flaming?
              >
              > Hint: You're not the only one around here that has a clue.
              >
              > Please try again.
              >
              > C4C wrote:
              > > Bill,
              > >
              > > I'm very familiar with Lab Metal. It is a non metallic substance which equates to a NON MAGNETIC substance. HINT: magnetic. Not only have I used Lab Metal I have also paid for it and I'll guarantee you that it does not fall into the category of body filler.
              > >
              > > Believe me when I tell you that 'I HAVE BEEN THERE AND DONE THAT'.
              > >
              > > Please try again.
              > >
              > > C4C
              > >
              > >
              >
            • curt wuollet
              Naw. I reverse emgineered it. I had this little flake where the column and base meet....... Regards cww
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 11, 2010
                Naw. I reverse emgineered it. I had this little
                flake where the column and base meet.......

                Regards

                cww

                Corey Renner wrote:
                >
                >
                > Curt,
                > you NAILED it. I hope you don't find yourself in court for disclosing
                > those trade secrets.
                >
                > c
                >
                > On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:37 PM, curt wuollet
                > <wideopen1@... <mailto:wideopen1@...>> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > To get the proper paint finish for these
                > you need extensive preparation.
                > Take all the finish and bondo off down to the worm holes.
                > Glob bondo wherever you feel the urge.
                > Spray the machine with something like drain oil.
                > Blow some dirt on it being careful to get full coverage.
                > Spend 15 seconds or so daubing with a paper towel to get some smooth
                > spots.
                > Spend another 15 seconds masking off things with used tape.
                > Use an epoxy paint and spray it thick enough to get a shell over the
                > grunge.
                > Try to get at least partial coverage on the leadscrews.
                > Wipe off any runs or overspray with a dirty shop rag.
                > Set someplace dusty till hard.
                > Immediately protect the finish with red goop, about a pound and a half.
                >
                > Just like new!
                >
                > Regards
                >
                > cww
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Rick Long
                Brian, Thanks for responding. I m not familiar with the brand Hammerite, so I ll research it. ________________________________ From: Brian Worth
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 13, 2010
                  Brian,
                  Thanks for responding.  I'm not familiar with the brand Hammerite, so I'll research it.


                  From: Brian Worth <electromodeler@...>
                  To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wed, February 10, 2010 10:18:51 PM
                  Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Proper paint for mill restoration

                   

                  Hi Richard, I used Hammerite on mine, and I am very pleased. Next time I will spray rather than paint though...

                  Brian


                  From: goyellowbike <goyellowbike@ yahoo.com>
                  To: mill_drill@yahoogro ups.com
                  Sent: Thu, 11 February, 2010 8:10:54
                  Subject: [mill_drill] Proper paint for mill restoration

                   

                  I was talking to Andy Newlands today, a bicycle builder and master machinist in Portland, OR, about a mill restoration he was starting, as I am currently cleaning up an old RF-30 myself, and he asked what sort of paint system I was using. We custom bicycle builders take our paint pretty seriously :>) so the question was no surprise. Fortunately for me, my mill pretty much just sat in a corner for years rusting and the paint is in great shape.

                  So, after that long lead in, can anyone tell me what sort of paint system is used on heavy machinery these days? I considered powder coating, or one of the catalyst paints, but I'm just guessing.

                  Oh yea, my "on-off" switch in on the fritz and so far the distributor and factory rep are really having a rough time locating a replacement for it! And I thought it was just an On-Off switch.

                  Thanks for any info about the paint.

                  Regards,

                  Richard Long
                  Temecula, CA



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