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Re: Used (New for me) RF31 2HP110/230V 1PH RONGFU MILL/DRILL

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  • Eric Fleming
    ... wrote: Hello Martin, Thank you for the response. No play in the dovetails or lead screw nuts. The play is one end of the lead screw
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "leasingham_connelly"
      <martin.connelly@...> wrote:
      Hello Martin,

      Thank you for the response. No play in the dovetails or lead screw
      nuts. The play is one end of the lead screw has float. If one time
      shimming fixes it then that is what I will have to do.

      Are there any rebuild or tweaking articles for this mill/drill that
      you know of? I'd like to give the whole machine a once over but need
      to know what to look for.

      Best regards,

      Eric

      >
      > Are you referring to play due to loose dovetails or backlash due to
      > worn leadscrews?
      >
      > Adjustment of the dovetails is by means of a tapered gib strip.
      Some
      > of these mills have a gib that can move as the table moves. I had
      to
      > fit a stop screw at one end of the gib strips on my mill so that it
      > did not tighten and loosen as the table moved one way or the other.
      >
      > The leadscrew nuts are usualy split so that they can be adjusted.
      > Usualy the split is spread by a screw in the nut to take up wear
      and
      > reduce backlash. A hex key mounted on a rod may be needed to adjust
      > it without dismantling the table.
      >
      > One end of the leadscrew can float in its bearing to allow for
      > thermal growth. The other end needs to be snug to keep backlash
      low.
      > There is usualy no adjustment other than shimming. As this end
      should
      > also have a thrust bearing there is not usualy a lot of wear so
      once
      > shimmed it doesn't need readjustment on a regular basis. I used a
      > nylon washer to reduce the backlash and give a small amount of
      > preload.
      >
      > MArtin
      >
    • Ray Livingston
      Eric, I don t think you ll find the document you re looking for. I ve certainly never seen such a thing, other than the ones you mention for the 9x20 lathes.
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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        Eric,
        I don't think you'll find the document you're looking for. I've
        certainly never seen such a thing, other than the ones you mention
        for the 9x20 lathes. But, a little common sense will get you 99% of
        the way there. For the rest, just ask.
        For your end-float, shimming is the only solution, assuming it is
        truly float in the shaft, rather than crappy loose bearings.

        Regards,
        Ray L.



        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Fleming" <bivilight@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "leasingham_connelly"
        > <martin.connelly@> wrote:
        > Hello Martin,
        >
        > Thank you for the response. No play in the dovetails or lead screw
        > nuts. The play is one end of the lead screw has float. If one time
        > shimming fixes it then that is what I will have to do.
        >
        > Are there any rebuild or tweaking articles for this mill/drill that
        > you know of? I'd like to give the whole machine a once over but
        need
        > to know what to look for.
        >
        > Best regards,
        >
        > Eric
        >
        > >
        > > Are you referring to play due to loose dovetails or backlash due
        to
        > > worn leadscrews?
        > >
        > > Adjustment of the dovetails is by means of a tapered gib strip.
        > Some
        > > of these mills have a gib that can move as the table moves. I had
        > to
        > > fit a stop screw at one end of the gib strips on my mill so that
        it
        > > did not tighten and loosen as the table moved one way or the
        other.
        > >
        > > The leadscrew nuts are usualy split so that they can be adjusted.
        > > Usualy the split is spread by a screw in the nut to take up wear
        > and
        > > reduce backlash. A hex key mounted on a rod may be needed to
        adjust
        > > it without dismantling the table.
        > >
        > > One end of the leadscrew can float in its bearing to allow for
        > > thermal growth. The other end needs to be snug to keep backlash
        > low.
        > > There is usualy no adjustment other than shimming. As this end
        > should
        > > also have a thrust bearing there is not usualy a lot of wear so
        > once
        > > shimmed it doesn't need readjustment on a regular basis. I used a
        > > nylon washer to reduce the backlash and give a small amount of
        > > preload.
        > >
        > > MArtin
        > >
        >
      • Eric Fleming
        Thanks Ray. I ll try shimming to fix the end float. When you speak of crappy loose bearings are you speaking of the thrust bearings? If so, I do not see them
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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          Thanks Ray. I'll try shimming to fix the end float. When you speak
          of "crappy loose bearings" are you speaking of the thrust bearings?
          If so, I do not see them available on the grizzly G1006 parts list.
          Where can replacements for these bearings be found?

          Best regards,

          Eric

          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Livingston" <jagboy1964@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Eric,
          > I don't think you'll find the document you're looking for.
          I've
          > certainly never seen such a thing, other than the ones you mention
          > for the 9x20 lathes. But, a little common sense will get you 99%
          of
          > the way there. For the rest, just ask.
          > For your end-float, shimming is the only solution, assuming it
          is
          > truly float in the shaft, rather than crappy loose bearings.
          >
          > Regards,
          > Ray L.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Fleming" <bivilight@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "leasingham_connelly"
          > > <martin.connelly@> wrote:
          > > Hello Martin,
          > >
          > > Thank you for the response. No play in the dovetails or lead
          screw
          > > nuts. The play is one end of the lead screw has float. If one
          time
          > > shimming fixes it then that is what I will have to do.
          > >
          > > Are there any rebuild or tweaking articles for this mill/drill
          that
          > > you know of? I'd like to give the whole machine a once over but
          > need
          > > to know what to look for.
          > >
          > > Best regards,
          > >
          > > Eric
          > >
          > > >
          > > > Are you referring to play due to loose dovetails or backlash
          due
          > to
          > > > worn leadscrews?
          > > >
          > > > Adjustment of the dovetails is by means of a tapered gib strip.
          > > Some
          > > > of these mills have a gib that can move as the table moves. I
          had
          > > to
          > > > fit a stop screw at one end of the gib strips on my mill so
          that
          > it
          > > > did not tighten and loosen as the table moved one way or the
          > other.
          > > >
          > > > The leadscrew nuts are usualy split so that they can be
          adjusted.
          > > > Usualy the split is spread by a screw in the nut to take up
          wear
          > > and
          > > > reduce backlash. A hex key mounted on a rod may be needed to
          > adjust
          > > > it without dismantling the table.
          > > >
          > > > One end of the leadscrew can float in its bearing to allow for
          > > > thermal growth. The other end needs to be snug to keep backlash
          > > low.
          > > > There is usualy no adjustment other than shimming. As this end
          > > should
          > > > also have a thrust bearing there is not usualy a lot of wear so
          > > once
          > > > shimmed it doesn't need readjustment on a regular basis. I used
          a
          > > > nylon washer to reduce the backlash and give a small amount of
          > > > preload.
          > > >
          > > > MArtin
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Ray Livingston
          Eric, I don t know what kind of bearings your mill has. Some are just bushings, in which case you really can t take out the slop without making some
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 5, 2008
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            Eric,

            I don't know what kind of bearings your mill has. Some are just
            bushings, in which case you really can't take out the slop without
            making some modifications to intall a real thrust bearing. Some are
            cheap thrust bearings, or just a normal ball bearing. What really
            *should* be there is a matched pair of angular contact ball
            bearings. I'm sure replacement bearings are available from Grizzly
            if you just call or e-mail their tech support.

            Regards,
            Ray L.


            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Fleming" <bivilight@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Ray. I'll try shimming to fix the end float. When you speak
            > of "crappy loose bearings" are you speaking of the thrust bearings?
            > If so, I do not see them available on the grizzly G1006 parts list.
            > Where can replacements for these bearings be found?
            >
            > Best regards,
            >
            > Eric
            >
            > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Livingston" <jagboy1964@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Eric,
            > > I don't think you'll find the document you're looking for.
            > I've
            > > certainly never seen such a thing, other than the ones you
            mention
            > > for the 9x20 lathes. But, a little common sense will get you 99%
            > of
            > > the way there. For the rest, just ask.
            > > For your end-float, shimming is the only solution, assuming
            it
            > is
            > > truly float in the shaft, rather than crappy loose bearings.
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > > Ray L.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Fleming" <bivilight@>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "leasingham_connelly"
            > > > <martin.connelly@> wrote:
            > > > Hello Martin,
            > > >
            > > > Thank you for the response. No play in the dovetails or lead
            > screw
            > > > nuts. The play is one end of the lead screw has float. If one
            > time
            > > > shimming fixes it then that is what I will have to do.
            > > >
            > > > Are there any rebuild or tweaking articles for this mill/drill
            > that
            > > > you know of? I'd like to give the whole machine a once over but
            > > need
            > > > to know what to look for.
            > > >
            > > > Best regards,
            > > >
            > > > Eric
            > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > Are you referring to play due to loose dovetails or backlash
            > due
            > > to
            > > > > worn leadscrews?
            > > > >
            > > > > Adjustment of the dovetails is by means of a tapered gib
            strip.
            > > > Some
            > > > > of these mills have a gib that can move as the table moves. I
            > had
            > > > to
            > > > > fit a stop screw at one end of the gib strips on my mill so
            > that
            > > it
            > > > > did not tighten and loosen as the table moved one way or the
            > > other.
            > > > >
            > > > > The leadscrew nuts are usualy split so that they can be
            > adjusted.
            > > > > Usualy the split is spread by a screw in the nut to take up
            > wear
            > > > and
            > > > > reduce backlash. A hex key mounted on a rod may be needed to
            > > adjust
            > > > > it without dismantling the table.
            > > > >
            > > > > One end of the leadscrew can float in its bearing to allow
            for
            > > > > thermal growth. The other end needs to be snug to keep
            backlash
            > > > low.
            > > > > There is usualy no adjustment other than shimming. As this
            end
            > > > should
            > > > > also have a thrust bearing there is not usualy a lot of wear
            so
            > > > once
            > > > > shimmed it doesn't need readjustment on a regular basis. I
            used
            > a
            > > > > nylon washer to reduce the backlash and give a small amount
            of
            > > > > preload.
            > > > >
            > > > > MArtin
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
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