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Re: Solid carbide endmills

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  • aldesigns
    I was checking out the speeds for carbide cutters and they are higher than the 2500 rpm that my mill will do. I did end up buying a set of carbide bits (6 bits
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 13, 2007
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      I was checking out the speeds for carbide cutters and they are higher
      than the 2500 rpm that my mill will do. I did end up buying a set of
      carbide bits (6 bits 1/8"- 1/2" for $81.00 cad$) they haven't arrived
      yet. I have been using the used endmills that came with my second hand
      mill they are all chipped and dull so I'm sure it will be a
      improvement over what I have.

      Thanks for all the input

      Shamas


      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Livingston" <jagboy1964@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Carbide end mills will stay sharp 2-3X longer than HSS, if you don't
      > abuse them. But, I've just discovered something interesting, and
      > someone has had the same experience. I just bought myself a full-
      > size knee-mill, and I'm finding, much to my surprise, that even the
      > cheapest HSS endmills last *far* longer on this machine than they
      > ever did on my mini-mill. I can't completely understand it, but I've
      > been working for a week with the same cheap Chinese 3/4" 2-flute HSS
      > endmill, on both aluminum and steel, and it's still razor sharp! I
      > always had a hard time get more than a few hours out of a HSS cutter
      > on the mini-mill. My guess is it is due, at least in part, to the
      > rigidity of the machine, which will reduce the impact loading on the
      > cutting edges.
      >
      > Regards,
      > Ray L.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy <william@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Carbide makes sense if you're cutting tough materials or if you're
      > in a
      > > time-is-money situation where you want to run your cutters as fast
      > as
      > > you can.
      > >
      > > In all likelihood, the extra expense is not worth it to you. The
      > only
      > > time I use carbide is when I'm too lazy to cut the appropriate
      > lathe bit
      > > out of HSS, and I don't use carbide mill cutters at all. The few
      > that I
      > > got when I was starting out and didn't know any better are all
      > chipped
      > > or broken now.
      > >
      > > --William A.
      > >
      > > aldesigns wrote:
      > > > I was wondering if solid carbide endmills are worth the extra
      > expense?
      > > > I am not machining anything exotic mostly mild steel and
      > aluminum. On
      > > > occasion I might work with some 300 series stainless. Are there
      > any
      > > > drawbacks to Carbide over HSS?
      > > >
      > > > I am relatively new to machining so all the advice I can get is
      > > > appreciated.
      > > >
      > > > thanks
      > > > Shamas
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Ray Livingston
      Shamas, Conventional Wisdom seems to dictate that carbide tools *MUST* be operated at high speed/high load. However, I have learned many, many times that
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 13, 2007
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        Shamas,

        Conventional Wisdom seems to dictate that carbide tools *MUST* be
        operated at high speed/high load. However, I have learned many, many
        times that Conventional Wisdom is very often wrong. I use carbide
        tooling all the time, and consistently find it lasts much longer than
        HSS, and I *don't* run it hot or hard. The finish I get is as good,
        if not better, than HSS. Carbide is capable of very high speeds, and
        running very hot, but it is *not* required.

        Regards,
        Ray L.


        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "aldesigns" <aldesigns@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was checking out the speeds for carbide cutters and they are
        higher
        > than the 2500 rpm that my mill will do. I did end up buying a set of
        > carbide bits (6 bits 1/8"- 1/2" for $81.00 cad$) they haven't
        arrived
        > yet. I have been using the used endmills that came with my second
        hand
        > mill they are all chipped and dull so I'm sure it will be a
        > improvement over what I have.
        >
        > Thanks for all the input
        >
        > Shamas
        >
        >
        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Livingston" <jagboy1964@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Carbide end mills will stay sharp 2-3X longer than HSS, if you
        don't
        > > abuse them. But, I've just discovered something interesting, and
        > > someone has had the same experience. I just bought myself a full-
        > > size knee-mill, and I'm finding, much to my surprise, that even
        the
        > > cheapest HSS endmills last *far* longer on this machine than they
        > > ever did on my mini-mill. I can't completely understand it, but
        I've
        > > been working for a week with the same cheap Chinese 3/4" 2-flute
        HSS
        > > endmill, on both aluminum and steel, and it's still razor sharp!
        I
        > > always had a hard time get more than a few hours out of a HSS
        cutter
        > > on the mini-mill. My guess is it is due, at least in part, to
        the
        > > rigidity of the machine, which will reduce the impact loading on
        the
        > > cutting edges.
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Ray L.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy <william@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Carbide makes sense if you're cutting tough materials or if
        you're
        > > in a
        > > > time-is-money situation where you want to run your cutters as
        fast
        > > as
        > > > you can.
        > > >
        > > > In all likelihood, the extra expense is not worth it to you.
        The
        > > only
        > > > time I use carbide is when I'm too lazy to cut the appropriate
        > > lathe bit
        > > > out of HSS, and I don't use carbide mill cutters at all. The
        few
        > > that I
        > > > got when I was starting out and didn't know any better are all
        > > chipped
        > > > or broken now.
        > > >
        > > > --William A.
        > > >
        > > > aldesigns wrote:
        > > > > I was wondering if solid carbide endmills are worth the extra
        > > expense?
        > > > > I am not machining anything exotic mostly mild steel and
        > > aluminum. On
        > > > > occasion I might work with some 300 series stainless. Are
        there
        > > any
        > > > > drawbacks to Carbide over HSS?
        > > > >
        > > > > I am relatively new to machining so all the advice I can get
        is
        > > > > appreciated.
        > > > >
        > > > > thanks
        > > > > Shamas
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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