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Plug Removal

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  • roylpopecharternet
    Anyone have a good method for removing the plug from a bi-metal hole saw after cutting a hole in steel??? I m not too happy trying to jab them out with a small
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 4, 2007
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      Anyone have a good method for removing the plug from a bi-metal hole
      saw after cutting a hole in steel???

      I'm not too happy trying to jab them out with a small screwdriver.

      Thanks,
      Roy
    • steve huck
      Worst case is to unthread the saw from the arbor and poke it out with a bigger screw driver. Sorry . . . I have nothing for you. roylpopecharternet
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 4, 2007
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        Worst case is to unthread the saw from the arbor and poke it out with a bigger screw driver.
         
        Sorry . . . I have nothing for you.

        roylpopecharternet <rlpope@...> wrote:
        Anyone have a good method for removing the plug from a bi-metal hole
        saw after cutting a hole in steel???

        I'm not too happy trying to jab them out with a small screwdriver.

        Thanks,
        Roy



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      • mikaelc
        Get a spring that will fit in the space between the center drill and the hole saw, long enough that it will push the plug out. Any good hardware store will
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 4, 2007
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        • Rexarino
          Finish the cut from the back side, then most of the plug is still sticking out when you finish. Or, drill opposing small holes on the inside periphery of the
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 5, 2007
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            Finish the cut from the back side, then most of the plug is still sticking out when you finish.

            Or, drill opposing small holes on the inside periphery of the circle beforehand, and grab the plug with needle nose pliers in the holes.

            Or, plug all but one hole with your fingers and apply the air gun to the open hole.

            Or, spin the drill in reverse, so the plug unwinds off the pilot drill

            rexarino

            On Dec 4, 2007 6:39 PM, roylpopecharternet < rlpope@...> wrote:
            Anyone have a good method for removing the plug from a bi-metal hole
            saw after cutting a hole in steel???

            I'm not too happy trying to jab them out with a small screwdriver.

            Thanks,
            Roy




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          • leasingham_connelly
            ... hole ... The problem with hole saws is that they can warm up when used. This makes them expand and the plug then gets trapped as the saw cools when the cut
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 5, 2007
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              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "roylpopecharternet" <rlpope@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Anyone have a good method for removing the plug from a bi-metal
              hole
              > saw after cutting a hole in steel???
              >
              > I'm not too happy trying to jab them out with a small screwdriver.
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Roy
              >
              The problem with hole saws is that they can warm up when used. This
              makes them expand and the plug then gets trapped as the saw cools
              when the cut is finished. You could try backing out before you get
              all the way thru, let the saw cool then clean up the groove with the
              cool blade before finishing the hole. As Miker suggested you can fit
              a spring, Starrett sell them for this purpose but any suitable
              strength and size should do. Rexarino's idea of two opposing holes
              is also workable, if drilling into material that is more than 16
              gauge then a hole at the periphery is recommended for chips to
              escape thru so that it does not build up in the groove and cause
              heat build up due to excessive rubbing. A good quality arbor is also
              essential. One that has a nut that clamps the back plate down onto
              the saw is much better than the spring loaded type that leave the
              blade loose to rattle about the drive pins.

              If you have a regular requirement to use a hole saw of a particular
              size consider getting a broach type cutter. They give a much cleaner
              hole and last a long time if used correctly. They can be mounted in
              a 3/4" or 19mm collet and are far better than holesaws on stainless
              steel.

              Martin
            • roylpopecharternet
              Thanks to all for several good ideas. I ll try a spring first, air pressure, drilling extra holes, and look into a broach type cutter last. Your feedback is
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 10, 2007
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                Thanks to all for several good ideas.
                I'll try a spring first, air pressure, drilling extra holes, and look
                into a broach type cutter last.
                Your feedback is appreciated.
                Roy

                --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "leasingham_connelly"
                <martin.connelly@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "roylpopecharternet" <rlpope@>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > Anyone have a good method for removing the plug from a bi-metal
                > hole
                > > saw after cutting a hole in steel???
                > >
                > > I'm not too happy trying to jab them out with a small screwdriver.
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > > Roy
                > >
                > The problem with hole saws is that they can warm up when used. This
                > makes them expand and the plug then gets trapped as the saw cools
                > when the cut is finished. You could try backing out before you get
                > all the way thru, let the saw cool then clean up the groove with the
                > cool blade before finishing the hole. As Miker suggested you can fit
                > a spring, Starrett sell them for this purpose but any suitable
                > strength and size should do. Rexarino's idea of two opposing holes
                > is also workable, if drilling into material that is more than 16
                > gauge then a hole at the periphery is recommended for chips to
                > escape thru so that it does not build up in the groove and cause
                > heat build up due to excessive rubbing. A good quality arbor is also
                > essential. One that has a nut that clamps the back plate down onto
                > the saw is much better than the spring loaded type that leave the
                > blade loose to rattle about the drive pins.
                >
                > If you have a regular requirement to use a hole saw of a particular
                > size consider getting a broach type cutter. They give a much cleaner
                > hole and last a long time if used correctly. They can be mounted in
                > a 3/4" or 19mm collet and are far better than holesaws on stainless
                > steel.
                >
                > Martin
                >
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