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New guy, stepper motor hook-up

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  • Shawn
    Hi im 25 and new to machining, just bought my first mill. Im working on a project that requires constant turning of the rotary table. I found a stepper motor
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 26, 2007
      Hi im 25 and new to machining, just bought my first mill. Im working
      on a project that requires constant turning of the rotary table. I
      found a stepper motor that i want to hook up to the table so i dont
      have to sit there and constantly turn the wheel for hours on end. Does
      anyone know how to hook up a stepper motor with a variable speed dial.
      I dont need it to do cnc i just need it to spin at a nice slow speed.

      This is the stepper motor
      http://www.xylotex.com/StepperMotor.htm

      im thinking i will need some sort of converter to power it and some
      sort of switch to control its speed.

      Looking for all helpful imformation.
    • Henry Arnold
      There a few companies that make stepper motor controller kits. Here s an example: http://www.electronickits.com/kit/complete/motor/ck1402.htm These work fine
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 26, 2007
        There a few companies that make stepper motor controller kits. Here's
        an example:

        http://www.electronickits.com/kit/complete/motor/ck1402.htm

        These work fine if you don't need a lot of torque. A rotary table
        should not need too much torque.

        Henry Arnold


        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn" <metalmechanic72@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi im 25 and new to machining, just bought my first mill. Im working
        > on a project that requires constant turning of the rotary table. I
        > found a stepper motor that i want to hook up to the table so i dont
        > have to sit there and constantly turn the wheel for hours on end. Does
        > anyone know how to hook up a stepper motor with a variable speed dial.
        > I dont need it to do cnc i just need it to spin at a nice slow speed.
        >
        > This is the stepper motor
        > http://www.xylotex.com/StepperMotor.htm
        >
        > im thinking i will need some sort of converter to power it and some
        > sort of switch to control its speed.
        >
        > Looking for all helpful imformation.
        >
      • Shawn
        Thanks but im not trying to make it a controlled model for cnc use, i just want it to be powerfeed, so that way it can turn in a constant circle without me
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 26, 2007
          Thanks but im not trying to make it a controlled model for cnc use, i
          just want it to be powerfeed, so that way it can turn in a constant
          circle without me having to spin the handle.



          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Henry Arnold" <henryarnold@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > There a few companies that make stepper motor controller kits.
          Here's
          > an example:
          >
          > http://www.electronickits.com/kit/complete/motor/ck1402.htm
          >
          > These work fine if you don't need a lot of torque. A rotary table
          > should not need too much torque.
          >
          > Henry Arnold
          >
          >
          > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn" <metalmechanic72@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi im 25 and new to machining, just bought my first mill. Im
          working
          > > on a project that requires constant turning of the rotary table.
          I
          > > found a stepper motor that i want to hook up to the table so i
          dont
          > > have to sit there and constantly turn the wheel for hours on
          end. Does
          > > anyone know how to hook up a stepper motor with a variable speed
          dial.
          > > I dont need it to do cnc i just need it to spin at a nice slow
          speed.
          > >
          > > This is the stepper motor
          > > http://www.xylotex.com/StepperMotor.htm
          > >
          > > im thinking i will need some sort of converter to power it and
          some
          > > sort of switch to control its speed.
          > >
          > > Looking for all helpful imformation.
          > >
          >
        • Stephen Robinson
          ... Controlling the speed of a stepper motor is quite an involved process, compared to controlling the speed of a DC motor. You need a power supply designed
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 26, 2007
            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn" <metalmechanic72@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks but im not trying to make it a controlled model for cnc use, i
            > just want it to be powerfeed, so that way it can turn in a constant
            > circle without me having to spin the handle.


            Controlling the speed of a stepper motor is quite an involved process,
            compared to controlling the speed of a DC motor.
            You need a power supply designed for the purpose( low V and high I) d
            a controller board and sometimes a frequency generator board,
            depending on the controller board the use.( the input frequncy
            determines the pulses to the motor) All (AFAIK) can be bought as kits
            and assembled if you have some kit building experience.
            I work with some electronics with my trade, but had alot to do with
            steppers before, so a mate and I decided to buy some kits, recently,
            and have a play. It was quite interesting experience.
            Steppers usually don't like spinning above around 300 RPM and they are
            also quite noisy, but those features may not be problematic for your
            application.
            I would lean towards using a DC gearmotor and a PWM speed control,
            myself. That would give alot more flexibility with the speed, run
            quietly, maintain torque ( which you won't need) and use simpler
            electronics for speed control.Its what I would use if I was going to
            do the same thing on my rotary table.
            Anyway, let us know how you get on.
            Stephen
          • jehancocy
            as others have stated, you should use a geared motor. Cost per torque, steppers are much more expensive than standard dc motors. To run a stepper, you need a
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 27, 2007
              as others have stated, you should use a geared motor.

              Cost per torque, steppers are much more expensive than standard dc
              motors.

              To run a stepper, you need a dc power supply in the 35v 3amp range per
              motor; a controller - most likely a gecko drive; and a pulse source
              for step and direction signals, the simplest being a PC with a
              parallel port through a parallel port breakout box (more expense). A
              standalone pulse source is not worth even building since in order to
              get a motor into the higher rpm, you have to ramp it up which is best
              done with a computer or microprocessor.


              regards,


              Jerry
            • Rexarino
              Shawn, take a look at this page. He shows how to drive a stepper with low voltage ac.
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 27, 2007
                Shawn, take a look at this page.  He shows how to drive a stepper with low voltage ac.

                http://home.earthlink.net/~jmcdohsd/id13.html

                rexarino

                On 9/26/07, Shawn <metalmechanic72@...> wrote:
                Hi im 25 and new to machining, just bought my first mill.  Im working
                on a project that requires constant turning of the rotary table.  I
                found a stepper motor that i want to hook up to the table so i dont
                have to sit there and constantly turn the wheel for hours on end.  Does
                anyone know how to hook up a stepper motor with a variable speed dial.
                I dont need it to do cnc i just need it to spin at a nice slow speed.

                This is the stepper motor
                http://www.xylotex.com/StepperMotor.htm

                im thinking i will need some sort of converter to power it and some
                sort of switch to control its speed.

                Looking for all helpful imformation.




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              • Ray Livingston
                Rex, Of course that s assuming you have a variable frequency AC power source that can deliver enough power for the motor, which few people will have.
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 27, 2007
                  Rex,

                  Of course that's assuming you have a variable frequency AC power
                  source that can deliver enough power for the motor, which few people
                  will have. Otherwise, it's fixed speed, and very low speed, if
                  you're running on 60 cycle AC.

                  Regards,
                  Ray L.



                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Rexarino <rexarino@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Shawn, take a look at this page. He shows how to drive a stepper
                  with low
                  > voltage ac.
                  >
                  >
                  http://home.earthlink.net/~jmcdohsd/id13.html<http://home.earthlink.ne
                  t/%7Ejmcdohsd/id13.html>
                  >
                  > rexarino
                  >
                  > On 9/26/07, Shawn <metalmechanic72@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi im 25 and new to machining, just bought my first mill. Im
                  working
                  > > on a project that requires constant turning of the rotary table.
                  I
                  > > found a stepper motor that i want to hook up to the table so i
                  dont
                  > > have to sit there and constantly turn the wheel for hours on
                  end. Does
                  > > anyone know how to hook up a stepper motor with a variable speed
                  dial.
                  > > I dont need it to do cnc i just need it to spin at a nice slow
                  speed.
                  > >
                  > > This is the stepper motor
                  > > http://www.xylotex.com/StepperMotor.htm
                  > >
                  > > im thinking i will need some sort of converter to power it and
                  some
                  > > sort of switch to control its speed.
                  > >
                  > > Looking for all helpful imformation.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Rexarino
                  Ray, I expect you are right, but it still seemed pertinent to this discussion. I wonder what the power of a stepper configured as shown in Mac s webpage
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 27, 2007
                    Ray, I expect you are right, but it still seemed pertinent to this discussion.  I wonder what the power of a stepper configured as shown in "Mac's" webpage would be?  I'm guessing rather low, but, he uses these for a sphere grinder...

                    It seems like something I should try one of these days.

                    rexarino

                    On 9/27/07, Ray Livingston < jagboy1964@...> wrote:
                    Rex,

                        Of course that's assuming you have a variable frequency AC power
                    source that can deliver enough power for the motor, which few people
                    will have.  Otherwise, it's fixed speed, and very low speed, if
                    you're running on 60 cycle AC.

                    Regards,
                    Ray L.



                    --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Rexarino <rexarino@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Shawn, take a look at this page.  He shows how to drive a stepper
                    with low
                    > voltage ac.
                    >
                    >
                    http://home.earthlink.net/~jmcdohsd/id13.html<http://home.earthlink.ne
                    t/%7Ejmcdohsd/id13.html>
                    >
                    > rexarino

                  • Ray Livingston
                    Rex, I think it s unlikely to deliver the torque the motor would actually be capable of when properly driven. And what you do get would be very much dependant
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 27, 2007
                      Rex,
                      I think it's unlikely to deliver the torque the motor would
                      actually be capable of when properly driven. And what you do get
                      would be very much dependant on whether you picked the right
                      capacitor value, and would also almost certainly be dependant on the
                      operating frequency. Speed I think would be severely limited due to
                      the capacitor. Overall, not a great solution.

                      Regards,
                      Ray L.



                      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Rexarino <rexarino@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Ray, I expect you are right, but it still seemed pertinent to this
                      > discussion. I wonder what the power of a stepper configured as
                      shown in
                      > "Mac's" webpage would be? I'm guessing rather low, but, he uses
                      these for a
                      > sphere grinder...
                      >
                      > It seems like something I should try one of these days.
                      >
                      > rexarino
                      >
                      > On 9/27/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Rex,
                      > >
                      > > Of course that's assuming you have a variable frequency AC
                      power
                      > > source that can deliver enough power for the motor, which few
                      people
                      > > will have. Otherwise, it's fixed speed, and very low speed, if
                      > > you're running on 60 cycle AC.
                      > >
                      > > Regards,
                      > > Ray L.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Rexarino <rexarino@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Shawn, take a look at this page. He shows how to drive a
                      stepper
                      > > with low
                      > > > voltage ac.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      http://home.earthlink.net/~jmcdohsd/id13.html<http://home.earthlink.ne
                      > > t/%7Ejmcdohsd/id13.html>
                      > > >
                      > > > rexarino
                      > >
                      >
                    • Carl McIver
                      If you choose to go this route, there are a number of little outfits on the web that sell motors and control systems for milling machines and DIY CNC folks.
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 30, 2007
                        If you choose to go this route, there are a number of little outfits on
                        the web that sell motors and control systems for milling machines and DIY
                        CNC folks. Having done a little bit of business with these guys, I do
                        recommend them: http://www.stepperworld.com/index.htm but they're not the
                        only fish in the sea, and the price is good.. Google is your friend to
                        learn more, and some of them sell software that does the job just fine for
                        you.
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