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Re: Column Moving Up

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  • bob_kellock
    ... I m slightly surprised that that works well enough. In the case of my RF25 clone, with the rack clamped to the column (using G clamps), there is about
    Message 1 of 29 , Dec 1, 2006
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      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Conrad_G" <conrad_g@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi - new member here - yes, i fixed my rack with two screws and a
      > roll pin some years ago, and I find it works OK - so you can't
      > swing the head, but I've never felt the need to. To make it really
      > accurate, I suppose shimming to remove any side play would work,
      > but my side play is negligible, and has not caused me any problems
      > so far. You just have to make sure the rack is truly vertical when
      > fixing to the column.
      >
      > Cheers - Conrad in Houston.
      >

      I'm slightly surprised that that works well enough.

      In the case of my RF25 clone, with the rack clamped to the column
      (using G clamps), there is about 0.050" slack at the spindle. The
      edges of the rack are unmachined and it is slightly bowed.

      If one edge of the rack was machined and it was fixed rigidly and
      truly vertically to the column then, if the head is twisted so that
      its slot is held firmly against the machined edge of the rack while
      tightening the pinch bolts, you should achieve acceptable
      registration.

      As well as fixing and locating the rack at both ends you would need
      to locate it near its middle (using, for example, a blind dowel) as,
      without it, the rack would bend when applying the twisting force. I
      estimate that to be about 0.001" at the spindle per pound force.

      Small holes drilled or tapped in the column would have no significant
      effect on its strength.

      Bob
    • Conrad_G
      ... a ... can t ... really ... work, ... problems ... when ... that ... while ... need ... as, ... I ... significant ... Bob - that s just the way I have it -
      Message 2 of 29 , Dec 1, 2006
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        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "bob_kellock" <bob@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Conrad_G" <conrad_g@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi - new member here - yes, i fixed my rack with two screws and
        a
        > > roll pin some years ago, and I find it works OK - so you
        can't
        > > swing the head, but I've never felt the need to. To make it
        really
        > > accurate, I suppose shimming to remove any side play would
        work,
        > > but my side play is negligible, and has not caused me any
        problems
        > > so far. You just have to make sure the rack is truly vertical
        when
        > > fixing to the column.
        > >
        > > Cheers - Conrad in Houston.
        > >
        >
        > I'm slightly surprised that that works well enough.
        >
        > In the case of my RF25 clone, with the rack clamped to the column
        > (using G clamps), there is about 0.050" slack at the spindle. The
        > edges of the rack are unmachined and it is slightly bowed.
        >
        > If one edge of the rack was machined and it was fixed rigidly and
        > truly vertically to the column then, if the head is twisted so
        that
        > its slot is held firmly against the machined edge of the rack
        while
        > tightening the pinch bolts, you should achieve acceptable
        > registration.
        >
        > As well as fixing and locating the rack at both ends you would
        need
        > to locate it near its middle (using, for example, a blind dowel)
        as,
        > without it, the rack would bend when applying the twisting force.
        I
        > estimate that to be about 0.001" at the spindle per pound force.
        >
        > Small holes drilled or tapped in the column would have no
        significant
        > effect on its strength.
        >
        > Bob
        >

        Bob - that's just the way I have it - my rack was not bowed, and I
        fastened it at both ends with a pin in the middle, and when raising
        or lowering the head, I keep pressure in one direction only on the
        side of the rack, and so far have had no problems.
        Cheers - Conrad
      • corey renner
        When I first got my machine, I cleaned the cosmoline off the column and lubed with way oil. On several occasions the head shifted slightly on heavy cuts
        Message 3 of 29 , Dec 1, 2006
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          When I first got my machine, I cleaned the cosmoline off the column and lubed with way oil.  On several occasions the head shifted slightly on heavy cuts despite the clamping bolts being tight.  I rethought things and cleaned the column with brake clean and allowed it to get that patina that bare iron exposed to air gets (not rust, but not shiny either).  Never had the head slip again.

          cheers,
          c

          On 11/30/06, derek@... <derek@...> wrote:


          I'm going to give the column a real good clean - but then
          what should I use to lubricate it. I've used light machine
          oil in the past (hardware store sort of stuff) - is this
          good, bad or makes no difference?


        • Lucky
          ... I scratched a plumb line (square with table)on the column and attached a clock hand pointer to tyhe casting pointing at the line. When releasing the
          Message 4 of 29 , Dec 5, 2006
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            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, <derek@...> wrote:
            >
            > Conrad (in sunny Houston)
            > To relocate for such ops after moving the head I just use a
            > length of drill rod in the chuck or collet then lower into
            > the existing hole. I'm sure the purists will say it's not
            > accurate enough but it's quite good enough for spot facing
            > or tapping. When you view at about 45deg you see a crescent
            > at either side of the rod in the hole - just make the two
            > cresecents visually the same size - sort of like a vernier.
            > Derek (in freezing Detroit)
            >
            I scratched a plumb line (square with table)on the column and attached
            a clock hand pointer to tyhe casting pointing at the line. When
            releasing the locking screw, just crank up or down and swing the head
            to the engraved line. It the pointer is sharp, accutate positioning is
            easy and nothing need be removed/replaced from the chuck or collet. If
            you need a photo, let me know.
          • Philip Burman
            What procedure did you use to ensure the scribed line was square with the table. Regards Phil ... attached ... head ... is ... If
            Message 5 of 29 , Dec 6, 2006
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              What procedure did you use to ensure the scribed line was square with
              the table.

              Regards
              Phil

              --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Lucky" <nmsunbuddy@...> wrote:
              > I scratched a plumb line (square with table)on the column and
              attached
              > a clock hand pointer to tyhe casting pointing at the line. When
              > releasing the locking screw, just crank up or down and swing the
              head
              > to the engraved line. It the pointer is sharp, accutate positioning
              is
              > easy and nothing need be removed/replaced from the chuck or collet.
              If
              > you need a photo, let me know.
              >
            • SupportOurTroops - Skip
              There was an article in the Home Shop Machinist magazine a year or so ago about securing the lift bar to keep the head in position. The first step in the
              Message 6 of 29 , Dec 6, 2006
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                There was an article in the Home Shop Machinist magazine a year or so
                ago about securing the lift bar to keep the head in position. The first step
                in the procedure was to square the column to the table. Many are not
                including mine. I'll see if I can find the date on it.

                Skip Campbell

                Philip Burman wrote:

                > What procedure did you use to ensure the scribed line was square with
                > the table.
                >
                > Regards
                > Phil
                >
                > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Lucky" <nmsunbuddy@...> wrote:
                > > I scratched a plumb line (square with table)on the column and
                > attached
                > > a clock hand pointer to tyhe casting pointing at the line. When
                > > releasing the locking screw, just crank up or down and swing the
                > head
                > > to the engraved line. It the pointer is sharp, accutate positioning
                > is
                > > easy and nothing need be removed/replaced from the chuck or collet.
                > If
                > > you need a photo, let me know.
                > >
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