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Re: spindle lock for a "RF30" mill/drill

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  • j.c.gerber
    I am not quite sure, but it seems that the drawbars for my milling machine are quite similar (see album John-Swtzerland). I made a few myself to fit other
    Message 1 of 6 , May 7, 2006
      I am not quite sure, but it seems that the drawbars for my milling machine are quite similar (see album John-Swtzerland). I made a few myself to fit other adapters I am using (http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/mill_drill/photos/browse/9e45)
       
      John, Switzerland
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2006 3:42 PM
      Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: spindle lock for a RF30 mill/drill

      In a message dated 5/6/2006 9:32:19 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, roberttgeorge@... writes:
      You should submit your design to HSM!
      I have had many articles published in HSM under the name R.G. Sparber and was about to submit the one you saw. I decided to put it out on the web after doing an extensive search for the uniqueness of my washer/nut. I did not want to go for a patent but I also did not want anyone else going for one either. The solution is to "defensively publish" as quickly as possible.
       
      Now that the article is on the web, HSM probably would not want it. However, I did submit it with the above explanation a few weeks ago to the editor. No word back yet. Since it has been published (on the web) already, it may be a sticky legal issue for them.
       
       
      Rick Sparber
      rgsparber@...
      web site: http://rick.sparber.org
    • rgsparber@aol.com
      John, I believe I see a bit of thread on what you call a counter nut. You also show threads on the top of the drawbar. This actually was my first attempt at a
      Message 2 of 6 , May 7, 2006
        John,
         
        I believe I see a bit of thread on what you call a counter nut. You also show threads on the top of the drawbar. This actually was my first attempt at a self locking drawbar but I declared it a failure. This arrangement does permit you to spin the drawbar into the collet and then independently apply the nut at any depth.
         
        What worked for me was to remove the threads in the "counter nut" and remove the threads on the top of the drawbar. In this way it is like a normal drawbar except that the lower washer/nut will prevent spindle rotation when a second wrench is applied.
         
        Rick Sparber
        rgsparber@...
        web site: http://rick.sparber.org
      • Glenn N
        Mine came from the factory very much like John s except the top pinned nut is a smaller size nut than the lower nut and you can slide the wrench past it to the
        Message 3 of 6 , May 7, 2006
          Mine came from the factory very much like John's except the top pinned nut
          is a smaller size nut than the lower nut and you can slide the wrench past
          it to the actual tightening nut. The nuts don't lock together. You spint
          the drawbar into the collett untill you are happy with the number of threads
          engaged. Then you spin the smaller nut down to the top of the spindle. The
          draw bar is held from turning by the fixed nut on top and you torque the
          bottom nut to tighten the collett. This is handy as not all the R8 adapters
          have the same length of threads. (I know they are supposed to but.. ) It
          works quite well on my machine (DM45) and explains my confusion as to why
          anyone would need a spindle lock :)
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <rgsparber@...>
          To: <mill_drill@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2006 8:29 AM
          Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: spindle lock for a "RF30" mill/drill


          > John,
          >
          > I believe I see a bit of thread on what you call a counter nut. You also
          > show threads on the top of the drawbar. This actually was my first attempt
          > at a
          > self locking drawbar but I declared it a failure. This arrangement does
          > permit
          > you to spin the drawbar into the collet and then independently apply the
          > nut
          > at any depth.
          >
          > What worked for me was to remove the threads in the "counter nut" and
          > remove
          > the threads on the top of the drawbar. In this way it is like a normal
          > drawbar except that the lower washer/nut will prevent spindle rotation
          > when a
          > second wrench is applied.
          >
          > Rick Sparber
          > rgsparber@...
          > web site: http://rick.sparber.org
          >
        • rgsparber@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/7/2006 11:17:30 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time, sleykin@charter.net writes: The draw bar is held from turning by the fixed nut on top and
          Message 4 of 6 , May 7, 2006
            In a message dated 5/7/2006 11:17:30 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time, sleykin@... writes:
            The
            draw bar is held from turning by the fixed nut on top and you torque the
            bottom nut to tighten the collet. 
            It is interesting that your draw bar works this way. My first attempt was exactly as you describe. However, as my lower nut contacted the spindle, it caused the spindle to turn. So even though the top nut did not turn, the spindle and therefore the collet turned. I was unable to draw up the collet.  This is the same as having a threaded rod fit through a pipe with nuts on the ends. The nuts can be snug on the pipe yet you can turn the rod in and out.
             
            So what is different here? Could it be that the threads on the collet end were finer than at the top end? If so, then you would get tightening.
             
            Rick Sparber
            rgsparber@...
            web site: http://rick.sparber.org
          • Glenn N
            ... From: To: Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2006 12:03 PM Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: spindle lock for a RF30
            Message 5 of 6 , May 7, 2006
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <rgsparber@...>
              To: <mill_drill@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2006 12:03 PM
              Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: spindle lock for a "RF30" mill/drill


              >
              > In a message dated 5/7/2006 11:17:30 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
              > sleykin@... writes:
              >
              > The
              > draw bar is held from turning by the fixed nut on top and you torque the
              > bottom nut to tighten the collet.
              >
              >
              > It is interesting that your draw bar works this way. My first attempt was
              > exactly as you describe. However, as my lower nut contacted the spindle,
              > it
              > caused the spindle to turn. So even though the top nut did not turn, the
              > spindle
              > and therefore the collet turned. I was unable to draw up the collet. This
              > is the same as having a threaded rod fit through a pipe with nuts on the
              > ends.
              > The nuts can be snug on the pipe yet you can turn the rod in and out.
              >
              > So what is different here? Could it be that the threads on the collet end
              > were finer than at the top end? If so, then you would get tightening.
              >

              Yes the top threads are coarse and the bottom threads are fine. It is also
              on a gear head mill. Probably much mor difficult to turn the sindle.

              Glenn
            • rgsparber@aol.com
              Glenn, Thanks for clearing this up for me. Rick Sparber rgsparber@AOL.com web site: http://rick.sparber.org
              Message 6 of 6 , May 7, 2006
                Glenn,
                 
                Thanks for clearing this up for me.
                 
                Rick Sparber
                rgsparber@...
                web site: http://rick.sparber.org
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