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New Album Added - Miker's Quill Light

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  • miker557
    Apparently the original post I made on the 3rd got eaten by Yahoo ..... Some time back there was a discussion concerning lighting of the work area, and I had
    Message 1 of 2 , May 6, 2006
      Apparently the original post I made on the 3rd got eaten by Yahoo .....

      Some time back there was a discussion concerning lighting of the work
      area, and I had mentioned mounting a bright LED at the quill, ala the
      Rotozip Tools. Well, I finally got around to doing it (only took a
      couple of hours).

      I began by removing the spindle nose cap. When I got my mill, it was
      missing this part, and not having an original to go by, I freelanced a
      new one. Turns out, after having seen an original, I made it thicker
      and beefier than it needed to be. That's okay, it gave me room to
      mount the light on. I drilled and tapped two 4-40 holes 180 degrees
      apart, and set some printed circuit board spacers in them. Next, I cut
      a ring out of a single-sided copper-clad proto board (mounting pads,
      no traces) to match the face size of the spindle cap (1 7/8 ID, 2 3/4
      OD). I drilled two holes into it so that it could mount on the PC
      spacers on the spindle cap. Next, I mounted 10 white, high-brightness
      10mm LEDs, and wired them together in parallel. A 3-volt, 400-milliamp
      power pack was then wired in, and small pieces of electrical tape were
      placed on the backside of the board, to insulate the wiring from the
      metal spindle cap. Finally, the spindl ebearing cap was replaced, and
      the ring light was mounted on it.

      Phot 1 shows the installation. The brighness of the lamps is due to
      the camera flash, the lights aren't actually on in this one. Also,
      you'll notice the LED's are flat and short. I sanded down the domes so
      that my fly cutter would clear them, and it had the added desirable
      effect of diffusing the light.

      Photos 2 and 3 show the installation with the lamps on, and 4 and 5
      were taken with no flash - the quill light provided the only
      illumination. In 5 you'll see that the work area is lit with an even,
      non-glaring light.

      As I said, this only took a couple of hours to build up. I wish I'd
      tackled it sooner.

      Mike
    • rgsparber@aol.com
      Mike, Great innovation. I have put it on my short list of mill/drill improvements. Thanks! Rick Sparber rgsparber@AOL.com web site: http://rick.sparber.org
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2006
        Mike,
         
        Great innovation. I have put it on my short list of mill/drill improvements.
         
        Thanks!
         
        Rick Sparber
        rgsparber@...
        web site: http://rick.sparber.org
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