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head zero

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  • tom
    how do yall keep the head zeroed when you raise and lower it? also is there any way to lower the spindle speed more? thanks, tom
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 30, 2006
      how do yall keep the head zeroed when you raise and lower it? also is
      there any way to lower the spindle speed more? thanks, tom
    • leasingham_connelly
      ... is ... If you re talking round column machines then it s near impossible to maintain alignment so most people work out methods of returning it to zero
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 31, 2006
        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <pigpen60@...> wrote:
        >
        > how do yall keep the head zeroed when you raise and lower it? also
        is
        > there any way to lower the spindle speed more? thanks, tom

        If you're talking round column machines then it's near impossible to
        maintain alignment so most people work out methods of returning it to
        zero after vertical movements. All sorts of proposed solutions are
        aired but I've not seen one being fully endorsed and considered the
        one to do.

        Spindle speed on a standard machine with pulleys, machine the drive
        pulleys smaller or make a new motor pulley unit with smaller
        diameters. Geared machines this is not easy as it requires different
        gear ratios putting into the gearbox. Best method is to have a
        variable speed motor. Single phase is not easy, DC variable voltage is
        possible but may lack low speed power if speed control is by voltage
        reduction. Best option is 3 phase motor and variable frequency drive
        (VFD). I don't think I've ever seen a posting from someone who has
        fitted a VFD and been disappointed, I have seen someone suffering from
        low speed power loss but this may be due to incorrect parameter
        settings on the VFD. They are realy popular with belt drive machines
        because it reduces or eliminates belt position changing (considered a
        PITA by most who do it). Fitting a 3 phase motor also gets rid of some
        noise (a real bonus), cogging and possibly a PRC motor with dodgy
        power specification and poor quality. Often a suitable 3 phase motor
        can be picked up free from scrap machinery if you're lucky but
        otherwise they are quite cheap. The VFD may cost three times the cost
        of the motor but there are usualy plenty to chose from. Most have
        downloadable manuals so you can learn about them before buying and you
        can get one that suits your needs.

        You can get two speed 3 phase motors but you still need 3 phase power
        to drive them. I havn't checked but I suspect if you have no 3 phase
        to start with then a 2 speed motor and a 1 phase to 3 phase converter
        may be a similar price to simple 3 phase motor with VFD.

        On the noise side, I have a VFD/3ph motor on my belt drive machine and
        at low speed all you hear when not cutting is the link belt squeaking
        as it bends and straightens around and between the pulleys. I suspect
        with suitable lubricant that would disapear, any one know of a
        suitable link belt lube? It would need to lube the belt without
        causing it to slip over the pulley and without degrading the link
        material.

        Martin
      • Troy
        For the price of your G1007 why don t you just get a square column? I would research your purchase before you start whipping out the green backs.
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 2, 2006
          For the price of your G1007 why don't you just get a square column? I
          would research your purchase before you start whipping out the green
          backs.

          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <pigpen60@...> wrote:
          >
          > how do yall keep the head zeroed when you raise and lower it? also is
          > there any way to lower the spindle speed more? thanks, tom
          >
        • Ted USP
          we have an old RF-30 ( round head mill drill), and new to machines and being from North Carolina, I just spit on it when it was almost impossible to re- zero
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 2, 2006
            we have an old RF-30 ( round head mill drill), and new to machines and being from North Carolina, I just spit on it when it  was almost impossible to re- zero it, didn't help much, but made me feel a lot better.
             
            On spindle speed, we bought a cheap motor speed control that just plugs in and it seems to work good.
             
            Good luck, God bless
            Ted
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Troy
            Sent: Sunday, April 02, 2006 2:14 AM
            Subject: [mill_drill] Re: head zero

            For the price of your G1007 why don't you just get a square column?  I
            would research your purchase before you start whipping out the green
            backs. 

            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <pigpen60@...> wrote:
            >
            > how do yall keep the head zeroed when you raise and lower it? also is
            > there any way to lower the spindle speed more? thanks, tom
            >




          • dereklola
            Quote If you re talking round column machines then it s near impossible to maintain alignment so most people work out methods of returning it to zero after
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 2, 2006
              Quote "If you're talking round column machines then it's near
              impossible to maintain alignment so most people work out methods of
              returning it to zero after vertical movements. All sorts of proposed
              solutions are aired but I've not seen one being fully endorsed and
              considered the one to do."

              Here's what I do - apologies if it's been mentioned before but I'm no
              longer a daily reader.

              If I suspect I'm going to have to move the head up or down I make sure
              there is a 1/4 hole somewhere on the piece. After adjustment I put a
              1/4 drill rod in an R8 collett and use that to re-position the table.
              Now the trick - don't just insert it in the hole - that would not be
              all that accurate - maybe +/- 010" at best. What I do is position the
              drill rod just above the hole - you'll then see a crescent shaped
              portion of the hole on either side of the drill rod. Adjust the table
              until the two crescent shapes are the same size/length. Do it twice of
              course for X and Y. Gives me +/- 001"

              If you need better than that get a Bridgeport!
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