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Re: Milling a curve

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  • accuratemike
    I think the rotary table is it....MIKE
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 5, 2006
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      I think the rotary table is it....MIKE
      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "wildcat4096" <wildcat4096@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Something that has always baffled me is how curves are done on a non-
      > cnc mill? I can see circles and arcs being done on a rotary table. I
      > can see moving X and Y at the same time to create a very crude looking
      > curve. I can see some fancy mechanical apparatus that connects both X
      > and Y in some ratio to allow both to be turned at once. But for the
      > person at home is there a good way to mill decent looking curves such
      > as in the shape of an 'S'? Is a rotary table and brain power for
      > correct layout the only way to go other than CNC?
      >
    • Rob Purdy
      I suppose if you really took you time and did the math you could do you own stepping in the right ratios. Rob. ... From: accuratemike
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 5, 2006
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        I suppose if you really took you time and did the math you could do you own
        "stepping" in the right ratios.

        Rob.

        ----Original Message Follows----
        From: "accuratemike" <mike@...>
        Reply-To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
        To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Milling a curve
        Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:02:17 -0000

        I think the rotary table is it....MIKE
        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "wildcat4096" <wildcat4096@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Something that has always baffled me is how curves are done on a non-
        > cnc mill? I can see circles and arcs being done on a rotary table. I
        > can see moving X and Y at the same time to create a very crude looking
        > curve. I can see some fancy mechanical apparatus that connects both X
        > and Y in some ratio to allow both to be turned at once. But for the
        > person at home is there a good way to mill decent looking curves such
        > as in the shape of an 'S'? Is a rotary table and brain power for
        > correct layout the only way to go other than CNC?
        >
      • miker557
        There is a way to calculate X-Y cordinates for milling a circle, but as someone else pointed out, there s a LOT of math involved. You would basically step the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 5, 2006
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          There is a way to calculate X-Y cordinates for milling a circle, but
          as someone else pointed out, there's a LOT of math involved. You
          would basically step the X and Y axis by mils. If you step each axis
          one mil at a time, in sequence (X,Y,X,Y, etc.), you'll get a perfect
          45-degree angle. For circles, you have to find out where each arc
          begins, and then gradually transition from one axis to another.


          Mike


          > >
          > > Something that has always baffled me is how curves are done on
          a non-
          > > cnc mill? I can see circles and arcs being done on a rotary
          table. I
          > > can see moving X and Y at the same time to create a very crude
          looking
          > > curve. I can see some fancy mechanical apparatus that connects
          both X
          > > and Y in some ratio to allow both to be turned at once. But
          for the
          > > person at home is there a good way to mill decent looking
          curves such
          > > as in the shape of an 'S'? Is a rotary table and brain power
          for
          > > correct layout the only way to go other than CNC?
          > >
          >
        • corey renner
          The traditional non-cnc way to do it is with a Volstro head. See one here.
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 5, 2006
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            The traditional non-cnc way to do it is with a Volstro head.  See one here.

            http://cgi.ebay.com/NICE-VOLSTRO-ROTARY-CROSS-SLIDE-MILLING-HEAD-CASE_W0QQitemZ7578436935QQcategoryZ104242QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

            Ebay auction #
            7578436935
            7578436935
            if the link breaks.

            c
            On 1/5/06, miker557 <mikaelc@...> wrote:

            There is a way to calculate X-Y cordinates for milling a circle, but
            as someone else pointed out, there's a LOT of math involved. You
            would basically step the X and Y axis by mils. If you step each axis
            one mil at a time, in sequence (X,Y,X,Y, etc.), you'll get a perfect
            45-degree angle. For circles, you have to find out where each arc
            begins, and then gradually transition from one axis to another.


            Mike


            >  >
            >  > Something that has always baffled me is how curves are done on
            a non-
            >  > cnc mill?  I can see circles and arcs being done on a rotary
            table.  I
            >  > can see moving X and Y at the same time to create a very crude
            looking
            >  > curve.  I can see some fancy mechanical apparatus that connects
            both X
            >  > and Y in some ratio to allow both to be turned at once.  But
            for the
            >  > person at home is there a good way to mill decent looking
            curves such
            >  > as in the shape of an 'S'?  Is a rotary table and brain power
            for
            >  > correct layout the only way to go other than CNC?
            >  >
            >







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          • William Abernathy
            If the rotary table is too much, I would suggest stepping, as suggested below, then getting out the files. --William A.
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 5, 2006
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              If the rotary table is too much, I would suggest stepping, as suggested below,
              then getting out the files.

              --William A.

              Rob Purdy wrote:
              > I suppose if you really took you time and did the math you could do you own
              > "stepping" in the right ratios.
              >
              > Rob.
              >
              > ----Original Message Follows----
              > From: "accuratemike" <mike@...>
              > Reply-To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Milling a curve
              > Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:02:17 -0000
              >
              > I think the rotary table is it....MIKE
              > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "wildcat4096" <wildcat4096@y...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Something that has always baffled me is how curves are done on a non-
              > > cnc mill? I can see circles and arcs being done on a rotary table. I
              > > can see moving X and Y at the same time to create a very crude looking
              > > curve. I can see some fancy mechanical apparatus that connects both X
              > > and Y in some ratio to allow both to be turned at once. But for the
              > > person at home is there a good way to mill decent looking curves such
              > > as in the shape of an 'S'? Is a rotary table and brain power for
              > > correct layout the only way to go other than CNC?
              > >
            • leasingham_connelly
              I have mounted a small x-y table on top of a rotary table to allow machining of a part with a number of different curve radii with one set up. It required a
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 6, 2006
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                I have mounted a small x-y table on top of a rotary table to allow
                machining of a part with a number of different curve radii with one
                set up. It required a lot of work with AutoCad to figure the angles
                for the RT and movements of both the mill table and small x-y table to
                do it right first time. Initial set up of the RT under the spindle was
                important and then making sure the two x axis movements were lined up
                with the RT at zero degrees. Table to spindle nose was large enough to
                do this with the equipment I have, some machines may not have the
                space. The part was the yoke on Elmer's pumping engine for those who
                know of Elmer's designs. Did both yokes from one plate with one set up

                Martin

                --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "wildcat4096" <wildcat4096@y...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Something that has always baffled me is how curves are done on a non-
                > cnc mill? I can see circles and arcs being done on a rotary table.
                I
                > can see moving X and Y at the same time to create a very crude
                looking
                > curve. I can see some fancy mechanical apparatus that connects both
                X
                > and Y in some ratio to allow both to be turned at once. But for the
                > person at home is there a good way to mill decent looking curves
                such
                > as in the shape of an 'S'? Is a rotary table and brain power for
                > correct layout the only way to go other than CNC?
                >
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