Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Looking at purchasing a Rong-Fu JFC-45N2F or similar clone

Expand Messages
  • accuratemike
    I have a JFC45N2F that I also purchased from Penn Tool. I use an Automation Direct GS2 VFD. It is a very nice machine. Penn Tool are good people, I picked mine
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a JFC45N2F that I also purchased from Penn Tool. I use an
      Automation Direct GS2 VFD. It is a very nice machine. Penn Tool are
      good people, I picked mine up. You will gradually have more money in
      tooling and such, than the machine. You might as well get the best you
      can afford. I never would have kicked out the ~$3K for the Rong-Fu
      though. I was lucky, the switch was busted off in transit. I got it
      for sub-clone price. The VFD negated the switch. (VFD was far cheaper
      than a switch and phase convertor) At least one other person posted
      here about getting a damaged 1ph RF from them, I think I know what hit
      mine. Power feed is down only, I use it ALOT. May be worth it. 3ph/VFD
      is extremely worthwhile. A 2spd, 3ph Rong-Fu is 3000rpm out of the
      box, before you tweek the VFD. If you are looking to go for higher
      rpm, up-size the VFD accordingly. It take more amps than the tag to
      run over speed. (I can reach a limit). Good luck, MIKE

      --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, David Wambolt <david.wambolt@d...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > I've been doing some research for a Mill/Drill machine to install in my
      > home shop. I think I'd be most satisfied with a dovetail square column
      > machine with a gear head. So after spending countless hours reading
      and
      > trying to locate old messages on this forum, I've came to the
      conclusion
      > that the most popular machines are:
      >
      > 1. Lathemaster ZAY4045FC or ZAY4045L (Out of these two, I'd go for the
      > ZAY4045L)
      > 2. Wholesale Tools ZAY4045M or 3006-0080 (Out of these two, I'd go for
      > the ZAY4045M due to the better electrical panel and axis travel though
      > it needs to be modded)
      > 3. Industrial Hobbies (I like the size, but I have not read of many
      > people using it for manual machining. CNC won't happen for a while.)
      > 4. Penn Tool Co DM-45. (This machine would most likely be my last
      > choice - but most seem to like it.)
      > 5. Real Rong-Fu JFC-45N2F. (I'd probably go with a 3 phase machine and
      > add a VFD. Power down-feed would be nice.)
      >
      > Those are the machines I've found that have the best reviews or
      > recommendations. If I'm wrong, please correct me as I'm a newbie
      here.
      > My question is, out of those machines, less the real Rong-Fu which
      > machine has the absolute best fit and finish? I want something that is
      > going to last me a while and will do a quality job in both roles.
      Right
      > now the only machine up there I probably wouldn't buy is the DM-45 from
      > Penn Tool Co. I've read a few people said they would have rather
      gotten
      > a different machines, but that does not mean it's not a great machine!
      > So please don't flame me up if you own one. :)
      >
      > Obviously the less I can spend, the better. However quality counts
      more
      > than money. Shipping charges can also make or break the deal since I'm
      > on the West Coast in California. I know Enco is close and I didn't
      list
      > that model, however the price is $2000+ for the clone, plus tax and
      > shipping. So it's out for that reason.
      >
      > Also if I buy one of the machines that does not have the nicer switch
      > hardware that the ZAY7045M or ZAY7045L have, can I easily add that to
      > any of these other clones? The ability to do tapping easily would be
      > nice. I would also add a power feed to the table. Has anyone added a
      > power downfeed on their clone? If so what did you use?
      >
      > I apologize for the somewhat boring questions. I'm sure you guys have
      > seen these a million times. However a lot of my research has taken me
      > back to 2003/2004 and I'm not sure if suppliers have changed. So it
      > seems like a good idea to try and get the latest and greatest scoop
      > before you plop down some major cash.
      >
      > Thanks in advance!
      >
      > David
      >
    • befunovo
      I just purchased a IH mill, recieved it over the holidays, got one of the last few in stock for the $2000. That and a $1000 in tooling from lathemaster/enco
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 9, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I just purchased a IH mill, recieved it over the holidays, got one of
        the last few in stock for the $2000. That and a $1000 in tooling
        from lathemaster/enco and I am set up! Going to be a manual machine
        only. Maintenance room, maybe some light production stuff.

        First impressions are nice. Have cut a few pieces of steel so far.
        Just some 3/8" end milling. All cold rolled, nothing hardened yet.

        First of all, been great working with IH, no problems. I also really
        like how up front they are about the quality of the machine and what
        needs to be finished up. There comment about an assembled kit that
        needs to be detailed is right on. When I set the mill up, I noticed
        that the table was loose, would rock back and forth some but the gib
        screws were tightened in. That was only thing that I noticed that
        didn't seem "right".

        As suggested by IH, I took apart the table and sadle and lapped the
        ways. This did make a difference, but when I put it back together I
        had to shim the gibs to get them to tighten up. .010 on the
        table, .007 on the saddle. Gibs are now pretty much centered when
        tighted up. Keep meaning to tell IH about the gibs, but keep
        forgetting about it also. Wondering if it happens or is mine
        unique. I did not do anything to the vertical yet, not sure I will
        as I work on smaller stuff and it will be manual. had a couple of
        small projects I had to work on first.

        Gear drive is nice. Speeds one, two and four are quiet to me. three
        is pretty quiet, five you start to hear the gear whine and on six it
        sings a little. Not bad, but you can hear it. Might get better as
        the gears seat together over time. Still, a very nice gear drive for
        the money.

        IH also told me to buy the 5/8 keyless chuck from lathemasters. He
        was right, that thing is nice! Do not try to swim with the chuck,
        quite a piece of equipment. If I add a power feed, will go with the
        one from lathemaster probally.

        Definately tell it is chinese. the screw driver included was pre
        bent and the handle grips look like they were done by hand with a
        dremel sander! Not a dig on IH, just kinda funny when I saw it.
        Actually still using the screwdriver though, it works.

        Table is large. I have a large 6" vise on one side with a rotary
        table mounted on the other side and room to work around both of
        them. Like I said, only doing small stuff right now but will get
        into larger stuff later.

        Might want to replace some of the handles down the road to ones that
        have bearings or bushings in them. Also, some of the grammer and
        spelling on the machine are incorrect, adds character. Instructions
        are a bit rough on the translation, but gets the point across.

        Motor runs fine on 220. Reversing switch seems to work great, I have
        no complaints about that. Depth scale on front is cheasy (as they
        all are on these) so I will want to mount a digital depth gauge to
        it. Might go DRO on all axis.

        CNC'ing this thing would be great, maybe another one down the road.

        Conclusion: IH represents there equipment very fairly, easy to deal
        with. Machine works as advertised or better I think. And yes I
        would buy another one. At $2000, this was a good deal. Feel sorry
        for you guys that have to pay $2,100 and wait while I am machining
        away! Like I said, only thing that was below expectation was the gib
        adjustments. Maybe Aaron can comment on that as I have seen him post
        on this board. Should have talked to him first about this before
        posting, but I still feel this mill is worth it and I still recomend
        it. Good job IH!

        Brian



        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "accuratemike" <mike@a...> wrote:
        >
        > I have a JFC45N2F that I also purchased from Penn Tool. I use an
        > Automation Direct GS2 VFD. It is a very nice machine. Penn Tool are
        > good people, I picked mine up. You will gradually have more money in
        > tooling and such, than the machine. You might as well get the best
        you
        > can afford. I never would have kicked out the ~$3K for the Rong-Fu
        > though. I was lucky, the switch was busted off in transit. I got it
        > for sub-clone price. The VFD negated the switch. (VFD was far
        cheaper
        > than a switch and phase convertor) At least one other person posted
        > here about getting a damaged 1ph RF from them, I think I know what
        hit
        > mine. Power feed is down only, I use it ALOT. May be worth it.
        3ph/VFD
        > is extremely worthwhile. A 2spd, 3ph Rong-Fu is 3000rpm out of the
        > box, before you tweek the VFD. If you are looking to go for higher
        > rpm, up-size the VFD accordingly. It take more amps than the tag to
        > run over speed. (I can reach a limit). Good luck, MIKE
        >
        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, David Wambolt
        <david.wambolt@d...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello,
        > >
        > > I've been doing some research for a Mill/Drill machine to install
        in my
        > > home shop. I think I'd be most satisfied with a dovetail square
        column
        > > machine with a gear head. So after spending countless hours
        reading
        > and
        > > trying to locate old messages on this forum, I've came to the
        > conclusion
        > > that the most popular machines are:
        > >
        > > 1. Lathemaster ZAY4045FC or ZAY4045L (Out of these two, I'd go
        for the
        > > ZAY4045L)
        > > 2. Wholesale Tools ZAY4045M or 3006-0080 (Out of these two, I'd
        go for
        > > the ZAY4045M due to the better electrical panel and axis travel
        though
        > > it needs to be modded)
        > > 3. Industrial Hobbies (I like the size, but I have not read of
        many
        > > people using it for manual machining. CNC won't happen for a
        while.)
        > > 4. Penn Tool Co DM-45. (This machine would most likely be my
        last
        > > choice - but most seem to like it.)
        > > 5. Real Rong-Fu JFC-45N2F. (I'd probably go with a 3 phase
        machine and
        > > add a VFD. Power down-feed would be nice.)
        > >
        > > Those are the machines I've found that have the best reviews or
        > > recommendations. If I'm wrong, please correct me as I'm a newbie
        > here.
        > > My question is, out of those machines, less the real Rong-Fu
        which
        > > machine has the absolute best fit and finish? I want something
        that is
        > > going to last me a while and will do a quality job in both roles.
        > Right
        > > now the only machine up there I probably wouldn't buy is the DM-
        45 from
        > > Penn Tool Co. I've read a few people said they would have rather
        > gotten
        > > a different machines, but that does not mean it's not a great
        machine!
        > > So please don't flame me up if you own one. :)
        > >
        > > Obviously the less I can spend, the better. However quality
        counts
        > more
        > > than money. Shipping charges can also make or break the deal
        since I'm
        > > on the West Coast in California. I know Enco is close and I
        didn't
        > list
        > > that model, however the price is $2000+ for the clone, plus tax
        and
        > > shipping. So it's out for that reason.
        > >
        > > Also if I buy one of the machines that does not have the nicer
        switch
        > > hardware that the ZAY7045M or ZAY7045L have, can I easily add
        that to
        > > any of these other clones? The ability to do tapping easily
        would be
        > > nice. I would also add a power feed to the table. Has anyone
        added a
        > > power downfeed on their clone? If so what did you use?
        > >
        > > I apologize for the somewhat boring questions. I'm sure you guys
        have
        > > seen these a million times. However a lot of my research has
        taken me
        > > back to 2003/2004 and I'm not sure if suppliers have changed. So
        it
        > > seems like a good idea to try and get the latest and greatest
        scoop
        > > before you plop down some major cash.
        > >
        > > Thanks in advance!
        > >
        > > David
        > >
        >
      • David Wambolt
        Thanks for the info! I actually purchased the IH mill last week and spoke with Aaron for 45 minutes on Friday. Really cool guy that knows his stuff. I don t
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 9, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for the info! I actually purchased the IH mill last week and
          spoke with Aaron for 45 minutes on Friday. Really cool guy that knows
          his stuff. I don't think I'll be dissapointed.

          I'm going to tear the entire machine down and spend a week or more
          prepping it for assembly.

          Thanks,
          David
          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "befunovo" <befunovo@y...> wrote:
          >
          > I just purchased a IH mill, recieved it over the holidays, got one of
          > the last few in stock for the $2000. That and a $1000 in tooling
          > from lathemaster/enco and I am set up! Going to be a manual machine
          > only. Maintenance room, maybe some light production stuff.
          >
          > First impressions are nice. Have cut a few pieces of steel so far.
          > Just some 3/8" end milling. All cold rolled, nothing hardened yet.
          >
          > First of all, been great working with IH, no problems. I also really
          > like how up front they are about the quality of the machine and what
          > needs to be finished up. There comment about an assembled kit that
          > needs to be detailed is right on. When I set the mill up, I noticed
          > that the table was loose, would rock back and forth some but the gib
          > screws were tightened in. That was only thing that I noticed that
          > didn't seem "right".
          >
          > As suggested by IH, I took apart the table and sadle and lapped the
          > ways. This did make a difference, but when I put it back together I
          > had to shim the gibs to get them to tighten up. .010 on the
          > table, .007 on the saddle. Gibs are now pretty much centered when
          > tighted up. Keep meaning to tell IH about the gibs, but keep
          > forgetting about it also. Wondering if it happens or is mine
          > unique. I did not do anything to the vertical yet, not sure I will
          > as I work on smaller stuff and it will be manual. had a couple of
          > small projects I had to work on first.
          >
          > Gear drive is nice. Speeds one, two and four are quiet to me. three
          > is pretty quiet, five you start to hear the gear whine and on six it
          > sings a little. Not bad, but you can hear it. Might get better as
          > the gears seat together over time. Still, a very nice gear drive for
          > the money.
          >
          > IH also told me to buy the 5/8 keyless chuck from lathemasters. He
          > was right, that thing is nice! Do not try to swim with the chuck,
          > quite a piece of equipment. If I add a power feed, will go with the
          > one from lathemaster probally.
          >
          > Definately tell it is chinese. the screw driver included was pre
          > bent and the handle grips look like they were done by hand with a
          > dremel sander! Not a dig on IH, just kinda funny when I saw it.
          > Actually still using the screwdriver though, it works.
          >
          > Table is large. I have a large 6" vise on one side with a rotary
          > table mounted on the other side and room to work around both of
          > them. Like I said, only doing small stuff right now but will get
          > into larger stuff later.
          >
          > Might want to replace some of the handles down the road to ones that
          > have bearings or bushings in them. Also, some of the grammer and
          > spelling on the machine are incorrect, adds character. Instructions
          > are a bit rough on the translation, but gets the point across.
          >
          > Motor runs fine on 220. Reversing switch seems to work great, I have
          > no complaints about that. Depth scale on front is cheasy (as they
          > all are on these) so I will want to mount a digital depth gauge to
          > it. Might go DRO on all axis.
          >
          > CNC'ing this thing would be great, maybe another one down the road.
          >
          > Conclusion: IH represents there equipment very fairly, easy to deal
          > with. Machine works as advertised or better I think. And yes I
          > would buy another one. At $2000, this was a good deal. Feel sorry
          > for you guys that have to pay $2,100 and wait while I am machining
          > away! Like I said, only thing that was below expectation was the gib
          > adjustments. Maybe Aaron can comment on that as I have seen him post
          > on this board. Should have talked to him first about this before
          > posting, but I still feel this mill is worth it and I still recomend
          > it. Good job IH!
          >
          > Brian
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "accuratemike" <mike@a...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I have a JFC45N2F that I also purchased from Penn Tool. I use an
          > > Automation Direct GS2 VFD. It is a very nice machine. Penn Tool are
          > > good people, I picked mine up. You will gradually have more money in
          > > tooling and such, than the machine. You might as well get the best
          > you
          > > can afford. I never would have kicked out the ~$3K for the Rong-Fu
          > > though. I was lucky, the switch was busted off in transit. I got it
          > > for sub-clone price. The VFD negated the switch. (VFD was far
          > cheaper
          > > than a switch and phase convertor) At least one other person posted
          > > here about getting a damaged 1ph RF from them, I think I know what
          > hit
          > > mine. Power feed is down only, I use it ALOT. May be worth it.
          > 3ph/VFD
          > > is extremely worthwhile. A 2spd, 3ph Rong-Fu is 3000rpm out of the
          > > box, before you tweek the VFD. If you are looking to go for higher
          > > rpm, up-size the VFD accordingly. It take more amps than the tag to
          > > run over speed. (I can reach a limit). Good luck, MIKE
          > >
        • accuratemike
          I guess one nice thing about the Rong Fu vs. Clones is that they are not a kit of parts . I set mine up and made $1200 with it immediately. I did clean and
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 10, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            I guess one nice thing about the Rong Fu vs. Clones is that they are
            not a "kit of parts". I set mine up and made $1200 with it
            immediately. I did clean and adjust a little, but I didn't need to
            "tear it down". Enjoy, MIKE

            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "befunovo" <befunovo@y...> wrote:
            >
            > I just purchased a IH mill, recieved it over the holidays, got one of
            > the last few in stock for the $2000. That and a $1000 in tooling
            > from lathemaster/enco and I am set up! Going to be a manual machine
            > only. Maintenance room, maybe some light production stuff.
            >
            > First impressions are nice. Have cut a few pieces of steel so far.
            > Just some 3/8" end milling. All cold rolled, nothing hardened yet.
            >
            > First of all, been great working with IH, no problems. I also really
            > like how up front they are about the quality of the machine and what
            > needs to be finished up. There comment about an assembled kit that
            > needs to be detailed is right on. When I set the mill up, I noticed
            > that the table was loose, would rock back and forth some but the gib
            > screws were tightened in. That was only thing that I noticed that
            > didn't seem "right".
            >
            > As suggested by IH, I took apart the table and sadle and lapped the
            > ways. This did make a difference, but when I put it back together I
            > had to shim the gibs to get them to tighten up. .010 on the
            > table, .007 on the saddle. Gibs are now pretty much centered when
            > tighted up. Keep meaning to tell IH about the gibs, but keep
            > forgetting about it also. Wondering if it happens or is mine
            > unique. I did not do anything to the vertical yet, not sure I will
            > as I work on smaller stuff and it will be manual. had a couple of
            > small projects I had to work on first.
            >
            > Gear drive is nice. Speeds one, two and four are quiet to me. three
            > is pretty quiet, five you start to hear the gear whine and on six it
            > sings a little. Not bad, but you can hear it. Might get better as
            > the gears seat together over time. Still, a very nice gear drive for
            > the money.
            >
            > IH also told me to buy the 5/8 keyless chuck from lathemasters. He
            > was right, that thing is nice! Do not try to swim with the chuck,
            > quite a piece of equipment. If I add a power feed, will go with the
            > one from lathemaster probally.
            >
            > Definately tell it is chinese. the screw driver included was pre
            > bent and the handle grips look like they were done by hand with a
            > dremel sander! Not a dig on IH, just kinda funny when I saw it.
            > Actually still using the screwdriver though, it works.
            >
            > Table is large. I have a large 6" vise on one side with a rotary
            > table mounted on the other side and room to work around both of
            > them. Like I said, only doing small stuff right now but will get
            > into larger stuff later.
            >
            > Might want to replace some of the handles down the road to ones that
            > have bearings or bushings in them. Also, some of the grammer and
            > spelling on the machine are incorrect, adds character. Instructions
            > are a bit rough on the translation, but gets the point across.
            >
            > Motor runs fine on 220. Reversing switch seems to work great, I have
            > no complaints about that. Depth scale on front is cheasy (as they
            > all are on these) so I will want to mount a digital depth gauge to
            > it. Might go DRO on all axis.
            >
            > CNC'ing this thing would be great, maybe another one down the road.
            >
            > Conclusion: IH represents there equipment very fairly, easy to deal
            > with. Machine works as advertised or better I think. And yes I
            > would buy another one. At $2000, this was a good deal. Feel sorry
            > for you guys that have to pay $2,100 and wait while I am machining
            > away! Like I said, only thing that was below expectation was the gib
            > adjustments. Maybe Aaron can comment on that as I have seen him post
            > on this board. Should have talked to him first about this before
            > posting, but I still feel this mill is worth it and I still recomend
            > it. Good job IH!
            >
            > Brian
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "accuratemike" <mike@a...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I have a JFC45N2F that I also purchased from Penn Tool. I use an
            > > Automation Direct GS2 VFD. It is a very nice machine. Penn Tool are
            > > good people, I picked mine up. You will gradually have more money in
            > > tooling and such, than the machine. You might as well get the best
            > you
            > > can afford. I never would have kicked out the ~$3K for the Rong-Fu
            > > though. I was lucky, the switch was busted off in transit. I got it
            > > for sub-clone price. The VFD negated the switch. (VFD was far
            > cheaper
            > > than a switch and phase convertor) At least one other person posted
            > > here about getting a damaged 1ph RF from them, I think I know what
            > hit
            > > mine. Power feed is down only, I use it ALOT. May be worth it.
            > 3ph/VFD
            > > is extremely worthwhile. A 2spd, 3ph Rong-Fu is 3000rpm out of the
            > > box, before you tweek the VFD. If you are looking to go for higher
            > > rpm, up-size the VFD accordingly. It take more amps than the tag to
            > > run over speed. (I can reach a limit). Good luck, MIKE
            > >
            > > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, David Wambolt
            > <david.wambolt@d...>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hello,
            > > >
            > > > I've been doing some research for a Mill/Drill machine to install
            > in my
            > > > home shop. I think I'd be most satisfied with a dovetail square
            > column
            > > > machine with a gear head. So after spending countless hours
            > reading
            > > and
            > > > trying to locate old messages on this forum, I've came to the
            > > conclusion
            > > > that the most popular machines are:
            > > >
            > > > 1. Lathemaster ZAY4045FC or ZAY4045L (Out of these two, I'd go
            > for the
            > > > ZAY4045L)
            > > > 2. Wholesale Tools ZAY4045M or 3006-0080 (Out of these two, I'd
            > go for
            > > > the ZAY4045M due to the better electrical panel and axis travel
            > though
            > > > it needs to be modded)
            > > > 3. Industrial Hobbies (I like the size, but I have not read of
            > many
            > > > people using it for manual machining. CNC won't happen for a
            > while.)
            > > > 4. Penn Tool Co DM-45. (This machine would most likely be my
            > last
            > > > choice - but most seem to like it.)
            > > > 5. Real Rong-Fu JFC-45N2F. (I'd probably go with a 3 phase
            > machine and
            > > > add a VFD. Power down-feed would be nice.)
            > > >
            > > > Those are the machines I've found that have the best reviews or
            > > > recommendations. If I'm wrong, please correct me as I'm a newbie
            > > here.
            > > > My question is, out of those machines, less the real Rong-Fu
            > which
            > > > machine has the absolute best fit and finish? I want something
            > that is
            > > > going to last me a while and will do a quality job in both roles.
            > > Right
            > > > now the only machine up there I probably wouldn't buy is the DM-
            > 45 from
            > > > Penn Tool Co. I've read a few people said they would have rather
            > > gotten
            > > > a different machines, but that does not mean it's not a great
            > machine!
            > > > So please don't flame me up if you own one. :)
            > > >
            > > > Obviously the less I can spend, the better. However quality
            > counts
            > > more
            > > > than money. Shipping charges can also make or break the deal
            > since I'm
            > > > on the West Coast in California. I know Enco is close and I
            > didn't
            > > list
            > > > that model, however the price is $2000+ for the clone, plus tax
            > and
            > > > shipping. So it's out for that reason.
            > > >
            > > > Also if I buy one of the machines that does not have the nicer
            > switch
            > > > hardware that the ZAY7045M or ZAY7045L have, can I easily add
            > that to
            > > > any of these other clones? The ability to do tapping easily
            > would be
            > > > nice. I would also add a power feed to the table. Has anyone
            > added a
            > > > power downfeed on their clone? If so what did you use?
            > > >
            > > > I apologize for the somewhat boring questions. I'm sure you guys
            > have
            > > > seen these a million times. However a lot of my research has
            > taken me
            > > > back to 2003/2004 and I'm not sure if suppliers have changed. So
            > it
            > > > seems like a good idea to try and get the latest and greatest
            > scoop
            > > > before you plop down some major cash.
            > > >
            > > > Thanks in advance!
            > > >
            > > > David
            > > >
            > >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.