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Re: [mill_drill] HF 42827 basic questions

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  • C.S. Mo
    ... Most people will probably know what you re talking about if you just say gear-head round column mill/drill, or RF40.. ... When I used to have one, I just
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 31, 2005
      >The mill/drill is a Harborfreight HF42827. It is marked ZAY7032G. It's
      >a gear-head mill/drill on a round column. Is this mill also known by
      >other names? I checked Grizzly, and did not see anything quite the
      >same. I did find pictures of a Rong Fu RF-40 that looked very similar.
      >Is there a generic name to refer to this tool to that more people will
      >understand than the HF number?

      Most people will probably know what you're talking about if you just say
      gear-head round column mill/drill, or RF40..

      >Secondly, I see a draw bolt for the R8 tooling, but I don't see a
      >spindle lock. I must be missing something. How are you supposed to
      >open/close a draw bolt without a spindle lock?

      When I used to have one, I just put it in low gear and tightened the
      draw bolt... Some people have gone to great lengths to make a wrench to
      hold onto the splines on the spindle. (Search the archives).

      >Next, any advice on a base? The tool weighs 625 lb (they say), add a
      >vise, and we're over 700 lb. Is there something people commonly use? I
      >don't think a tool cabinet is sturdy enough. I can build something from
      >MDF that'll take the weight, I'm quite sure, (and may have to do it) but
      >before I go there I would like to see what there is available. Since
      >this tool is a total surprise for me, I am not very prepared for it.

      As a lot of people have mentioned - mdf sounds like a bad idea! I built
      my stand out of 2x2x1/4" wall square tubing, which is a bit of overkill
      - if you brace it properly you could use 2x2x1/8" angle iron (available
      at Home Depot..etc although it is horrifically expensive now!) or, I'd
      use some 4x4 PT for legs and some 3/4" plywood with bracing underneath.
      If you ever intend to use coolant, or even if you don't think you're
      going to, you'll probably want to make some kind of waterproof drip tray
      underneath the base of the machine.

      There's some pictures of my ex-mill/drill here:

      http://www.smidgie.com/928/machineshop

      >And lastly, advice on initial cleanup and setup? Removing the packing
      >grease with kerosene I suppose. But how do I get the tables to operate

      I use "odorless" mineral spirits.

      >smoothly? Right now, they are stiff. I presume there is packing grease
      >down there under the tables also. Is it best to take them apart
      >completely, clean and lube, then adjust the gibs?

      Yes.

      --C.S.

      >Any advise is appreciated!
      >--
      >Regards,
      >Rich
      >================================
      >Richard Kleinhenz
      >http://beautifulhandmadepens.com
      >http://www.woodpens.com/rkleinhenz.htm
      >================================
      >
      >
    • Paul Huffman
      Wow Rich, big machine for a pen maker =8^). I sent you a PM. Paul in OKC
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2005
        Wow Rich, big machine for a pen maker =8^). I sent you a PM.
        Paul in OKC
      • Robert George
        ... [From Richard] ... You ll find a highly abrasive mix of cosmoline, casting sand, and cast iron swarf under the table (and in the gear head and quill
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 7, 2005
          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "C.S. Mo" <cs@v...> wrote:
          [From Richard]
          > > But how do I get the tables to operate smoothly? Right now, they
          > > are stiff.
          > >
          > > I presume there is packing grease down there under the tables also.

          You'll find a highly abrasive mix of cosmoline, casting sand, and cast
          iron swarf under the table (and in the gear head and quill assembly).

          > > Is it best to take them apart completely, clean and lube, then
          > > adjust the gibs?

          > Yes.

          I agree -- you definitely want to take the table off before you start
          moving it around and grinding that mess into the table ways, and
          abrading the x/y acme nuts.

          After you clean and oil everything, move the table around without
          completely re-assembling (you don't need to put the roll pins back
          in, for example) and adjust the gibs and the backlash screws on the
          acme nuts until the table moves smoothly.

          Robert
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