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urgent: there's a 42827 on my BIL's truck

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  • Richard Kleinhenz
    It was supposed to be Big Red 42976, but it turns out to be a 42827 sitting on my brother-in-law s truck in my driveway. And it needs to come off! Not a lot
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 29, 2005
      It was supposed to be Big Red 42976, but it turns out to be a 42827 sitting on my brother-in-law's truck in my driveway.  And it needs to come off!  Not a lot of time either, this has to happen tomorrow (Sunday)
       
      Some questions (but maybe I am approaching it all wrong, so fire away with any info you may have)
       
      What chunks can this be broken down into easily?
       
      I unbolted the motor, was hoping it'd just lift off, but it didn't.  Probably has an internal snap ring.  Can this be done easily?  Now of course I realize it can't be that easy, there has to be a gear on the shaft.  What's the trick to get access?  That motor gotta weigh a good bit by itself
       
      Assuming I can get the motor off - can I take the cap off the top of the column, raise the head and lift it off?  There will be 2 of us
       
      The column is just bolted down with 4 bolts.  Can they just be removed?  Should I drop the column before or after the head is off?  I thought I could put a support under the head maybe, drop head and column, raise it on wood blocks for clearance, then crank to push out the column
       
      It was dark when I got started, and temp is just above freezing now, so it all has to wait till morning.  Any help is much appreciated!
       

      --
      Regards,
      Rich
      ================================
      Richard Kleinhenz
      ================================
    • carbideqc
      Rick, I don t know what you have at your disposal but my wife and I laoded and unloaded a 700 LB wood lathe from a pickup using several(3 or 4, I think from
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 29, 2005
        Rick,
        I don't know what you have at your disposal but my wife and I laoded
        and unloaded a 700 LB wood lathe from a pickup using several(3 or 4,
        I think from home depot) 10 ft treated posts as an inclined plane.
        Just make sure they are sufficient to support the weight and remove
        the tailgate if it isn't rated high enough.

        The lathe was rolled on 3/4 " pipe (3 ft) from my gluing clamps. As
        one would roll back another would be placed in front (used 4 pipe if
        I remember right). I couldn't get my wife to catch the lathe while i
        pushed it off the truck so i had to use a couple of come-along cable
        hoists alternately when full extension was reached. We are both
        retired and in our late 60's with me limited to lifting 50 lbs max
        due to reduced capacity after heart surgery.

        Maybe this will give you some ideas. Where there's a will there's a
        way, but above all be safe.

        PV -Tulsa, OK

        --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Richard Kleinhenz <kleinhen@o...>
        wrote:
        >
        > It was supposed to be Big Red 42976, but it turns out to be a
        42827 sitting on my brother-in-law's truck in my driveway. And it
        needs to come off! Not a lot of time either, this has to happen
        tomorrow (Sunday)
        >
        > Some questions (but maybe I am approaching it all wrong, so fire
        away with any info you may have)
        >
        > What chunks can this be broken down into easily?
        >
        > I unbolted the motor, was hoping it'd just lift off, but it
        didn't. Probably has an internal snap ring. Can this be done
        easily? Now of course I realize it can't be that easy, there has to
        be a gear on the shaft. What's the trick to get access? That motor
        gotta weigh a good bit by itself
        >
        > Assuming I can get the motor off - can I take the cap off the top
        of the column, raise the head and lift it off? There will be 2 of us
        >
        > The column is just bolted down with 4 bolts. Can they just be
        removed? Should I drop the column before or after the head is off?
        I thought I could put a support under the head maybe, drop head and
        column, raise it on wood blocks for clearance, then crank to push
        out the column
        >
        > It was dark when I got started, and temp is just above freezing
        now, so it all has to wait till morning. Any help is much
        appreciated!
        > --
        > Regards,
        > Rich
        > ================================
        > Richard Kleinhenz
        > http://beautifulhandmadepens.com
        > http://www.woodpens.com/rkleinhenz.htm
        > ================================
        >
      • Jerry Stephenson
        Rich, I see you ve also posted this question on the drill mill group. This is indeed a mill drill class weapon and I m sure you ll be very pleased that you
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 30, 2005
          Rich,
          I see you've also posted this question on the drill mill group. This
          is indeed a mill drill class weapon and I'm sure you'll be very
          pleased that you got the heavier machine.

          However, taking it apart isn't a viable option in my opinion. It is
          a lot of work and then you still have parts too heavy to safely
          handle by hand. What you need is an engine hoist. Harbor freight
          puts them on sale for $99 frequently and the only reason I don't have
          one is they take a lot of room. But I think there's one in the
          garage/worksheed of about 1/2 the hobbiests, cobblers, and even the
          wannabe's all over the US. So check with your neighbors.

          If you can't find one for free, you can rent them. I like the ones
          that tow behind your truck. They're on wheels and very easy to move
          around. The others have to be loaded up to bring home from the
          rental facility but most of them collapse. They're all good for 1000
          lbs at a good length of arm extension and you can lift up the crate
          and drive out from under it. Then you'll just roll the engine hoist
          to the proper location and set it down.

          Actually, thinking about it--the crate can be hard to rig so I would
          knock the sides and top off the crate in the truck and rig the mill
          drill by the upper assembly. I use a bunch of old mountaineers
          webbing that I have handy.

          Now one problem I see is that most rental facilities are closed on
          Sunday. We have one in a local True Value hardware store that is
          open on Sunday.

          Whatever you do, don't hurt yourself. Trying to unload this thing
          without the proper tools can get you hurt. Using the boards to slide
          it down like has been suggested can certainly be done but it is
          somewhat accident likely, especially if you're at the level of asking
          for help instead of providing advice. If I were you I'd leave it in
          the truck until I could get a crane.

          Ond more option: If you have a big dip at the bottom of your
          driveway where you can put the rear wheels of the truck and get the
          tailgate down to about 6" off the ground you could slide it off onto
          a rolling cart but even that can be difficult and if you tip it over
          on someone they will get hurt.

          Good luck and be safe,
          Jerry
        • Richard Kleinhenz
          Thanks a lot, Jerry! The engine hoist is good advice, and is something I will keep my eyes open for. This sort of thing happens too often for me, and I m not
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 30, 2005
            Thanks a lot, Jerry! The engine hoist is good advice, and is something I will keep my eyes open for. This sort of thing happens too often for me, and I'm not getting younger!

            As it turns out, it's off the truck now. My brother in law stopped by this morning, we removed the head at the tilting pivot, then the column, and were able to lift the individual pieces off the truck, then by dolly into the basement shop (level entry). For reassembly (once I construct a suitable base) or if I end up selling it) I'll have en engine hoist on hand.

            The 3 pieces were manageable, but just barely. No hernia, but I'll feel my back tomorrow ;-)

            Thanks again

            On 10/30/2005 at 2:36 PM Jerry Stephenson wrote:

            >Rich,
            >I see you've also posted this question on the drill mill group. This
            >is indeed a mill drill class weapon and I'm sure you'll be very
            >pleased that you got the heavier machine.
            >
            >However, taking it apart isn't a viable option in my opinion. It is
            >a lot of work and then you still have parts too heavy to safely
            >handle by hand. What you need is an engine hoist. Harbor freight
            >puts them on sale for $99 frequently and the only reason I don't have
            >one is they take a lot of room. But I think there's one in the
            >garage/worksheed of about 1/2 the hobbiests, cobblers, and even the
            >wannabe's all over the US. So check with your neighbors.

            --
            Regards,
            Rich
            ================================
            Richard Kleinhenz
            http://beautifulhandmadepens.com
            http://www.woodpens.com/rkleinhenz.htm
            ================================
          • Ken Tjomsland
            Rich, As others have warned, people can and do get hurt doing what you re planning. At 600 plus lbs, extreme care is called for. Mills are top heavy. If
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 30, 2005
              Rich,
              As others have warned, people can and do get hurt
              doing what you're planning. At 600 plus lbs, extreme
              care is called for. Mills are "top heavy." If it
              gets tilted too much, the two of you probably wont be
              able to keep it from crashing, especially if you're
              working in ice-covered conditions.

              If you can rent an "engine crane" it might be well
              worth it. The crane can easily lift the mill and it
              can roll with it if you have a concrete surface to
              work on.

              "Come alongs"--the hand-powered cable winches
              available almost anywhere can also easily lift the
              mill, if you have a very strong beam for attachment.
              A single 2x4 garage roof truss member is NOT strong
              enough for this lift. Several trusses might be safe,
              but you'll need an additional beam to spread the load
              among many.

              If you can lift the mill, you can drive the truck out
              from under it, then lower it to the ground. From
              there the 3/4 inch pipe roller approach might work.
              Sometimes, two 3/4 inch sheets of plywood with the
              pipes between them can work to facilitate this
              movement.

              I can't help with the dissassembly issues, but
              anything you get off can help. Do you know someone
              who has experience at something like this? If so, get
              their help!

              Right now you have a "small problem." If you break
              something because you got in a hurry or someone gets
              hurt, you will have a much larger additional problem,
              and you still will not have solved the first problem.
              Going from little problem to big problem can take less
              than one-half second. So, take your time, anticipate
              everything going wrong that can, and use tools rather
              than men lifting with arms whenever possible.

              Do this right and you'll have a lot of fun and
              additional abilities with this new machine!

              -Ken Tjomsland

              --- Richard Kleinhenz <kleinhen@...> wrote:

              > It was supposed to be Big Red 42976, but it turns
              > out to be a 42827 sitting on my brother-in-law's
              > truck in my driveway. And it needs to come off!
              > Not a lot of time either, this has to happen
              > tomorrow (Sunday)
              >
              > Some questions (but maybe I am approaching it all
              > wrong, so fire away with any info you may have)
              >
              > What chunks can this be broken down into easily?
              >
              > I unbolted the motor, was hoping it'd just lift off,
              > but it didn't. Probably has an internal snap ring.
              > Can this be done easily? Now of course I realize it
              > can't be that easy, there has to be a gear on the
              > shaft. What's the trick to get access? That motor
              > gotta weigh a good bit by itself
              >
              > Assuming I can get the motor off - can I take the
              > cap off the top of the column, raise the head and
              > lift it off? There will be 2 of us
              >
              > The column is just bolted down with 4 bolts. Can
              > they just be removed? Should I drop the column
              > before or after the head is off? I thought I could
              > put a support under the head maybe, drop head and
              > column, raise it on wood blocks for clearance, then
              > crank to push out the column
              >
              > It was dark when I got started, and temp is just
              > above freezing now, so it all has to wait till
              > morning. Any help is much appreciated!
              > --
              > Regards,
              > Rich
              > ================================
              > Richard Kleinhenz
              > http://beautifulhandmadepens.com
              > http://www.woodpens.com/rkleinhenz.htm
              > ================================
              >
              >


              Ken Tjomsland234 N. 50 Ave.Longview, WA 98632360-636-3663



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            • Robert George
              ... Be very careful with the engine hoist -- the 2 Ton rating drops off dramatically as the boom is extended, as you have to do to get it into the back of a
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 7, 2005
                --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Richard Kleinhenz <kleinhen@o...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Thanks a lot, Jerry! The engine hoist is good advice, and is
                > something I will keep my eyes open for.

                Be very careful with the engine hoist -- the "2 Ton" rating drops
                off dramatically as the boom is extended, as you have to do to
                get it into the back of a pickup truck.

                > we removed the head at the tilting pivot, then the column, and
                > were able to lift the individual pieces off the truck
                ...
                > The 3 pieces were manageable, but just barely.

                The other piece that's easily removable is the table. You really
                want to take the table off to clean the x/y ways and the leadscrews
                of casting sand and cosmoline anyway...

                Robert
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