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Chuck on Rong Fu

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  • charlygcharlygcharlyg
    Hello Room - I have just purchased a Rong-Fu RF 31 Mill Drill (new) - I was told by the retailer that the 1/2 inch Drill Chuck was just a slip fit and that all
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 14, 2005
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      Hello Room - I have just purchased a Rong-Fu RF 31 Mill Drill (new) - I
      was told by the retailer that the 1/2 inch Drill Chuck was just a slip
      fit and that all I had to do was slide it on the arbor and key in a
      drill-bit and it would hold without spinning - I tried to drill 2
      simple holes in a soft material and the chuck kept falling off - I
      rapped it with a mallet but it still came off. I realise this is veryu
      rudimentary but am I missing something? any help would be appreciated -
      many t
    • charlygcharlygcharlyg
      Hello Room - I have just purchased a Rong-Fu RF 31 Mill Drill (new) - I was told by the retailer that the 1/2 inch Drill Chuck was just a slip fit and that all
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 14, 2005
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        Hello Room - I have just purchased a Rong-Fu RF 31 Mill Drill (new) - I
        was told by the retailer that the 1/2 inch Drill Chuck was just a slip
        fit and that all I had to do was slide it on the arbor and key in a
        drill-bit and it would hold without spinning - I tried to drill 2
        simple holes in a soft material and the chuck kept falling off - I
        rapped it with a mallet but it still came off. I realise this is veryu
        rudimentary but am I missing something? any help would be appreciated -
        many t
      • corey renner
        The tapers on the chuck and arbor need to be clean of grease and oil before joining. Scrub them clean with a rag and give them a good whack (I bang them
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 14, 2005
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          The tapers on the chuck and arbor need to be clean of grease and oil before joining.  Scrub them clean with a rag and give them a good whack (I bang them together on a wooden workbench) and they should stay put.  Some people chill the arbor and heat the chuck before joining, but I've never found that to be necessary.

          cheers,
          c

          On 9/14/05, charlygcharlygcharlyg <charlygcharlygcharlyg@...> wrote:
          Hello Room - I have just purchased a Rong-Fu RF 31 Mill Drill (new) - I
          was told by the retailer that the 1/2 inch Drill Chuck was just a slip
          fit and that all I had to do was slide it on the arbor and key in a
          drill-bit and it would hold without spinning - I tried to drill 2
          simple holes in a soft material and the chuck kept falling off - I
          rapped it with a mallet but it still came off. I realise this is veryu
          rudimentary but am I missing something? any help would be appreciated -
          many t





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        • Glenn N
          If it has an R-8 spindle it has to have a draw bar to hold it in. R-8 is not a real great self holding taper. If it is MT or you ar talking about the JT part
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 14, 2005
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            If it has an R-8 spindle it has to have a draw bar to hold it in.  R-8 is not a real great self holding taper.  If it is MT or you ar talking about the JT part of the setup then yup clean it and smack it together.
            Glenn
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2005 5:16 PM
            Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Chuck on Rong Fu

            The tapers on the chuck and arbor need to be clean of grease and oil before joining.  Scrub them clean with a rag and give them a good whack (I bang them together on a wooden workbench) and they should stay put.  Some people chill the arbor and heat the chuck before joining, but I've never found that to be necessary.

            cheers,
            c

            On 9/14/05, charlygcharlygcharlyg <charlygcharlygcharlyg@...> wrote:
            Hello Room - I have just purchased a Rong-Fu RF 31 Mill Drill (new) - I
            was told by the retailer that the 1/2 inch Drill Chuck was just a slip
            fit and that all I had to do was slide it on the arbor and key in a
            drill-bit and it would hold without spinning - I tried to drill 2
            simple holes in a soft material and the chuck kept falling off - I
            rapped it with a mallet but it still came off. I realise this is veryu
            rudimentary but am I missing something? any help would be appreciated -
            many t





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            Yahoo! Groups Links

            <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mill_drill/

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          • s_f_guy
            All this talk about whacking drill chucks (without further explanation) is making my skin crawl. Despite it s rather proletarian position among tool and work
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 16, 2005
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              All this talk about "whacking" drill chucks (without further
              explanation) is making my skin crawl. Despite it's rather
              proletarian position among tool and work holding devices, a drill
              chuck is still a precision mechanism and should be treated as such.
              (OK, I realize that Chinese/Taiwanese drill chucks may not be all
              that precise, but why would you want to make them worse by abusing
              them?)

              While one must indeed whack a JT-mount drill chuck to securely mate
              it to a JT-tapered R8 arbor (assuming that's indeed what you have),
              one must not go whacking the chuck willy-nilly without regard for
              where and how it's whacked.

              Here's how to do it right:

              1. It is critical that both mating JT surfaces be absolutely clean,
              dry, and grease free. Any specks of grit or blips of cosmoline can
              and will prevent the tapers from locking. Using a lint-free cloth
              and mineral spirits, wipe the tapers down so that you have shiny
              spotless bare metal.

              2. Inspect the arbor's external taper for any dings, nicks, or
              burrs. If you find any, don't panic. Simply take a small, fine
              abrasive stone and lightly "stone" the defect *by hand* until it is
              flush with the surface of the taper.

              3. Inspect the chuck's internal taper for any dings, nicks, or
              burrs. If you find any, DO panic. Your chuck is probably not
              serviceable.

              4. Mate the chuck onto the arbor by hand, giving it a light twist
              until you feel it grab. If it slips easily, feels rough, or does not
              feel like the two tapers are a perfect fit: stop! Either your tapers
              are dirty or they're damaged (or they're not matched to each other
              with the same taper).

              5. Here's the critical step (which is often forgotten) that MUST be
              observed before whacking: turn the outer sleeve of the chuck to
              retract the jaws into the body of the chuck. The jaws must be below
              the level of the body so that when you whack the chuck, you are
              whacking only on the body and not on the jaws.

              6. Turn the assembly so that the chuck is facing down (hold onto the
              chuck so it doesn't accidentally fall off the arbor) and place the
              chuck on a piece of hard wood. I like to use a thick piece of
              particle board because it is dense, hard, and flat. The wood will
              give you a rigid anvil for whacking, but will not damage the body of
              your chuck.

              7. Get your heavy, soft-faced mallet or hammer. I like to use a lead
              hammer, but a brass or copper head will do fine. You do have a soft-
              faced hammer, right? If not, put another piece of particle board
              over the top of your arbor (and next time you're at the tool store,
              buy a soft-faced hammer).

              8. Now it's time to whack. But don't start thrashing on it: a single
              solid low- to medium-strength blow should be sufficient to lock the
              tapers.

              Now you're done. Your chuck is firmly mated to the arbor and should
              never slip or fall off. If, for some reason, you do need to separate
              them, acquire and use the special wedges designed for this purpose.
              Again, you don't want to damage your chuck (or your arbor) by
              beating or prying on them.

              - Michael
            • ppump11578@aol.com
              I do not wish to interfer in what appears to be a close relationship between man and mallet but on my machine the No 4 Morse taper has an internal thread on
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 16, 2005
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                I do not wish to interfer in what appears to be a close relationship between man and mallet but on my machine the No 4 Morse taper has an internal thread on its rear end and all I need to do to ensure that it does not come lose is to simply tighten the drawbar  end where it protrodes at the end of the spindle.  To loosen it I either undo the the drawbar a couple of turns and then use a four pound hammer to give it a sharp blow or use the taper in the cross slot in the lower section of the spindle.
                regards
                pp
              • Bill Pace
                Michael... This post is a very good presentation of the way to put the chuck on. Not preachy, and easily understood. It seems too many times the poster seems
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 16, 2005
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                  Michael...

                  This post is a very good presentation of the way to put the chuck
                  on. Not preachy, and easily understood. It seems too many times the
                  poster seems to forget that the audience he's presenting to (in most
                  cases,-- like this forum) is a home hobbiest with a new import
                  machine and self teaching himself. I've seen this same problem
                  brought up (chuck falling off) and the poster have a heart attack
                  when "whacking" was mentioned. Few of the folks in this group will
                  have an expensive Albrect keyless chuck, installing it on a
                  Bridgeport milling machine. So, I think the majority of us
                  appreciates a response with that in mind and that a good "whack" is
                  often needed.

                  Bill Pace




                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "s_f_guy" <s_f_guy@y...> wrote:
                  > All this talk about "whacking" drill chucks (without further
                  > explanation) is making my skin crawl. Despite it's rather
                  > proletarian position among tool and work holding devices, a drill
                  > chuck is still a precision mechanism and should be treated as
                  such.
                  > (OK, I realize that Chinese/Taiwanese drill chucks may not be all
                  > that precise, but why would you want to make them worse by abusing
                  > them?)
                  >
                  >
                • r_corriveau
                  I am curious, is the chuck falling off the arbour, or is the chuck and arbour falling from the quill? I think the previous replies covered both aspects... So,
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 16, 2005
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                    I am curious, is the chuck falling off the arbour, or is the chuck
                    and arbour falling from the quill? I think the previous replies
                    covered both aspects... So, what was the problem??



                    > drill-bit and it would hold without spinning - I tried to drill 2
                    > simple holes in a soft material and the chuck kept falling off - I
                  • Curt Blank
                    I just happened to noticed this thread, I ve never used a hammer of any kind when attaching a drill chuck, or anything else to a tapered shaft. My dad taught
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 25, 2005
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                      I just happened to noticed this thread, I've never used a hammer of any
                      kind when attaching a drill chuck, or anything else to a tapered shaft.
                      My dad taught me a trick a long time ago that has served me well and
                      I've never had any two items that I put together come apart using this
                      method.

                      In the case of the drill chuck and the R8 arbor I would put them
                      together chuck up and then holding it and guiding it by the arbor drop
                      it onto a solid surface, like a vise or anvil. The weight of the chuck
                      or whatever it is you're trying to mate is enough weight to make a
                      permanent connection. One drop is usually good enough but me always over
                      engineering things usually does it twice. If a nick to the end of the
                      arbor is totally forbidden I will put a 1/4" brass plate on the vise first.

                      I wouldn't even think of using a hammer on my Tapmatic.

                      r_corriveau wrote:
                      > I am curious, is the chuck falling off the arbour, or is the chuck
                      > and arbour falling from the quill? I think the previous replies
                      > covered both aspects... So, what was the problem??
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >>drill-bit and it would hold without spinning - I tried to drill 2
                      >>simple holes in a soft material and the chuck kept falling off - I
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • shooterke99
                      -- your taper female and male should be clean,fine scotch bright will clean up a taper . your tapers should be clean and dry ,no oil should be needed.of course
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 29, 2005
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                        --
                        your taper female and male should be clean,fine scotch bright will
                        clean up a taper . your tapers should be clean and dry ,no oil should
                        be needed.of course oil for storage .



                        - In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Pace" <pace8@b...> wrote:
                        > Michael...
                        >
                        > This post is a very good presentation of the way to put the chuck
                        > on. Not preachy, and easily understood. It seems too many times the
                        > poster seems to forget that the audience he's presenting to (in most
                        > cases,-- like this forum) is a home hobbiest with a new import
                        > machine and self teaching himself. I've seen this same problem
                        > brought up (chuck falling off) and the poster have a heart attack
                        > when "whacking" was mentioned. Few of the folks in this group will
                        > have an expensive Albrect keyless chuck, installing it on a
                        > Bridgeport milling machine. So, I think the majority of us
                        > appreciates a response with that in mind and that a good "whack" is
                        > often needed.
                        >
                        > Bill Pace
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "s_f_guy" <s_f_guy@y...> wrote:
                        > > All this talk about "whacking" drill chucks (without further
                        > > explanation) is making my skin crawl. Despite it's rather
                        > > proletarian position among tool and work holding devices, a drill
                        > > chuck is still a precision mechanism and should be treated as
                        > such.
                        > > (OK, I realize that Chinese/Taiwanese drill chucks may not be all
                        > > that precise, but why would you want to make them worse by abusing
                        > > them?)
                        > >
                        > >
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