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Re: stand height

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  • Kenneth Emmert
    I am hesitant to recommend what you should do. In my case I originally built a very solid bench out of 2x6 s with 4x4 legs and used two sheets of plywood and
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 1 7:20 AM
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      I am hesitant to recommend what you should do. In my case I originally
      built a very solid bench out of 2x6's with 4x4 legs and used two sheets of
      plywood and 1 sheet of mdf. I copied the bench that Dan Kautz made for his
      8x14 Lathemaster lathe. Below is the link to Dan's web site.
      http://www.tedatum.com/thms/index.html

      Custom build a stand or better yet a station! After purchasing that Mill
      stand my opinion is they are junk. A huge waste of space and space is a
      precious commodity for most of us. Placing a 700lb mill on a 50lb sheet
      metal stand is not a great concept! Do not forget to order levelers they
      are not included another $30.00.
      Design for tooling storage and correct height most of us end up with
      multiple vices and things like a rotary table. At about 100lbs apiece not
      moving them any further than possible is a good thought.
      Milling machine tooling eventually requires a huge amount of storage and
      organization. While not true when you purchase it accessories will build
      up. Mill foot print is 3' x 6' and that commercial cabinet will about store
      a 2 gallon container of misting fluid.
      If you weld that $150.00 will buy quite a bit of steel and heavy duty drawer
      slides, EBay is where I purchased slides.

      Ken
      Kenneth A. Emmert
      Spokane Metal Works
    • got_milk_eh
      Hi, If you are planning to build a custom stand, as suggested by other people, then you should consider a variable height stand. The stand I built can be
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 2 8:20 AM
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        Hi,
        If you are planning to build a custom stand, as suggested by other
        people, then you should consider a variable height stand. The stand I
        built can be raised and lowered for different jobs. If I'm doing
        something small and close to the table I raise the height so it easier
        to see. If its larger and the mill head is at the top of the column,
        then I lower the stand. I used a trailer jack for the up/down
        adjustment and have stops at different heights. Also try to use the
        stand for storage and put on good mounting feet that absorb vibration
        and allow for leveling adjustment.
      • chrisattebery
        Guys, I built a stand for my mill/drill a couple years ago. Check out: http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2002_retired_files/MillBench.jpg I do mostly small
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 2 12:29 PM
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          Guys,

          I built a stand for my mill/drill a couple years ago. Check out:

          http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2002_retired_files/MillBench.jpg

          I do mostly small pieces and I hate stooping over to see what I'm
          doing, so the top of my vice is at 48". Sounds tall, but once you get
          the mill up to where you're not bent over the table you'll wonder how
          you worked on it before.




          Chris




          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "John P. Labutski" <kd6wd@c...>
          wrote:
          > Well I am about six foot and I basically prefer a lower base. I
          have the lathemaster stand and its about 30" high. But, I prefer to
          bend over a bit and look down on the work. If I had my druthers I
          would prefer a stand about 28" high. Most guys like the 30" inch high
          stand. 38" inches is going to put chips up as high as your eyes.
          That kodak machine stand would make an excellent work table directly
          behind you and 38" inches would be a perfect height for a surface
          plate, tools, a sketch pad, etc. I had my 7045 up on my wood bench
          which is a bit over 33 1/2 inches high and it was way up there.
          >
          > I just measured the lathemaster and the max height of the machine
          from the top of the stand it sits on to the top of the motor is about
          58" when the spindle is about 17 inches above the table. The width of
          the column is 8" plus.
          >
          > Also, You might consider a 2x6 riser pad in front of it. If you use
          1x3 slats on it, it will be very easy on your feet. I used 3 1x4's
          with 1x3 slats and its very easy on the feet. Mine is about 6 feet
          long and 3 feet wide and the top is about 1 1/2" above the concrete
          floor.
          >
          > John
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: two4tom
          > To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2004 2:50 PM
          > Subject: [mill_drill] dove tail info
          >
          >
          > Can someone measure a dove tail column Mill-Drill for me? I want
          to
          > find how much room I have to get this into my garage with this
          > machine table from Kodak.
          > I guess if the head is all the way down what would be the height
          of
          > the column?BTW I am hoping to use that steel table as my base it
          is
          > about 700lb but it sits 38" high. Is that to high for me I am
          5'/8"
          > Thank you
          > Tom C.
          >
          >
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        • Jerry
          bingo on the height issue. I build flintlocks and hav emu vise set up so the gun is about at my best focal length when I m standing at the bench. I don t last
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 2 12:59 PM
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            bingo on the height issue. I build flintlocks and hav emu vise set up so the gun is about at my best focal length when I'm standing at the bench. I don't last too long is I have to work bent over the work piece.

            chrisattebery <chris.attebery@...> wrote:
            Guys,

            I built a stand for my mill/drill a couple years ago. Check out:

            http://www.metalworking.com/DropBox/_2002_retired_files/MillBench.jpg

            I do mostly small pieces and I hate stooping over to see what I'm
            doing, so the top of my vice is at 48". Sounds tall, but once you get
            the mill up to where you're not bent over the table you'll wonder how
            you worked on it before.




            Chris




            --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "John P. Labutski" <kd6wd@c...>
            wrote:
            > Well I am about six foot and I basically prefer a lower base.  I
            have the lathemaster stand and its about 30" high. But, I prefer to
            bend over a bit and look down on the work.  If I had my druthers I
            would prefer a stand about 28" high. Most guys like the 30" inch high
            stand. 38" inches is going to put chips up as high as your eyes. 
            That kodak machine stand would make an excellent work table directly
            behind you and 38" inches would be a perfect height for a surface
            plate, tools, a sketch pad, etc. I had my 7045 up on my wood bench
            which is a bit over 33 1/2 inches high and it was way up there.
            >
            > I just measured the lathemaster and the max height of the machine
            from the top of the stand it sits on to the top of the motor is about
            58" when the spindle is about 17 inches above the table.  The width of
            the column is 8" plus.
            >
            > Also, You might consider a 2x6 riser pad in front of it. If you use
            1x3 slats on it, it will be very easy on your feet.  I used 3  1x4's
            with 1x3 slats and its very easy on the feet. Mine  is about 6 feet
            long and 3 feet wide and the top is about  1 1/2" above the concrete
            floor.
            >
            > John
            >
            >
            >   ----- Original Message -----
            >   From: two4tom
            >   To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
            >   Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2004 2:50 PM
            >   Subject: [mill_drill] dove tail info
            >
            >
            >   Can someone measure a dove tail column Mill-Drill for me? I want
            to
            >   find how  much room I have to get this into my garage with this
            >   machine table from Kodak.
            >   I guess if the head is all the way down what would be the height
            of
            >   the column?BTW I am hoping to use that steel table as my base it
            is
            >   about 700lb but it sits 38" high. Is that to high for me I am
            5'/8"
            >   Thank you
            >   Tom C.
            >
            >
            >         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            >               ADVERTISEMENT
            >             
            >       
            >       
            >
            >
            >
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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            >     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mill_drill/
            >      
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          • Matt Bushore
            I may be needing to put my mill drill into storage. Any suggestions for gunk to spray on it or other storage methods? I am in Iowa and it can get pretty humid
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 2 1:07 PM
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              I may be needing to put my mill drill into storage.

              Any suggestions for gunk to spray on it or other storage methods?

              I am in Iowa and it can get pretty humid here during the summer.

              thanks
              Matt
            • John P. Labutski
              Try an auto supply. Also, the cheaper clone of STP is nice and sticky when mixed with axle grease. Caution: Before you coat things with grease or whatever,
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 2 4:42 PM
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                Try an auto supply.  Also,  the cheaper clone of STP is nice and sticky when mixed with axle grease.
                 
                Caution: Before you coat things with grease or whatever, dry the surfaces well with a hair dryer. This will make smearing easier and help prevent trapped moisture from rusting surfaces.
                 
                John
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Friday, July 02, 2004 1:07 PM
                Subject: [mill_drill] storing a mill


                I may be needing to put my mill drill into storage.

                Any suggestions for gunk to spray on it or other storage methods?

                I am in Iowa and it can get pretty humid here during the summer.

                thanks
                Matt




              • John
                The military used (and may still use) cosmoline to ensure metal didn t rust in storage. Also known as Par-al-ketone, it is available from a number of sources,
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 2 4:49 PM
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                  The military used (and may still use) cosmoline to ensure metal
                  didn't rust in storage. Also known as Par-al-ketone, it is available
                  from a number of sources, e.g. Aircraft Spruce. It can be brushed on
                  or thinned and sprayed, making it reasonably easy to apply. It
                  doesn't dry for a very long time so minor scratches to the film are
                  self-healing. The color is medium brown after application.

                  The down side to it (and there's always a down side)is that it is
                  hard to remove, much like the original preservative used on the
                  mill.

                  John




                  --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, Matt Bushore <matt@j...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I may be needing to put my mill drill into storage.
                  >
                  > Any suggestions for gunk to spray on it or other storage methods?
                  >
                  > I am in Iowa and it can get pretty humid here during the summer.
                  >
                  > thanks
                  > Matt
                • rgsparber@aol.com
                  John, I have had good luck with LPS3. See - http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-1296&PMPXNO=943635&PARTPG=INLMK3 Rick Sparber rgsparber@AOL.com My Web
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 2 4:53 PM
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                    John,
                     
                    I have had good luck with LPS3. See -
                     
                     
                     
                    Rick Sparber

                    rgsparber@...

                    My Web Site:
                    rgsparber.fifthprime.com
                  • Jerry
                    When I had this same converdation with a master machinist friend of mine he said buy a can of CRC and spray it on after you clean the tool well of other oils
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 2 6:35 PM
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                      When I had this same converdation with a master machinist friend of mine he said buy a can of CRC and spray it on after you clean the tool well of other oils and lubes. CRC has a volital in it that evaporates and leaves behind a waxy material that protects the metal. I use it on the ways of my lathe and surfaces of other tools in my shop.

                      Matt Bushore <matt@...> wrote:

                      I may be needing to put my mill drill into storage.

                      Any suggestions for gunk to spray on it or other storage methods?

                      I am in Iowa and it can get pretty humid here during the summer.

                      thanks
                      Matt





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                    • Matt Bushore
                      ... thanks. I ll check with Spruce. I didn t think the original junk was too nasty. I usually just spray it with WD-40 and let it soak and slog it off with
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 3 9:55 AM
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                        John wrote:

                        > The military used (and may still use) cosmoline to ensure metal
                        > didn't rust in storage. Also known as Par-al-ketone, it is available
                        > from a number of sources, e.g. Aircraft Spruce. It can be brushed on
                        > or thinned and sprayed, making it reasonably easy to apply. It
                        > doesn't dry for a very long time so minor scratches to the film are
                        > self-healing. The color is medium brown after application.
                        >
                        > The down side to it (and there's always a down side)is that it is
                        > hard to remove, much like the original preservative used on the
                        > mill.
                        >
                        > John


                        thanks. I'll check with Spruce.

                        I didn't think the original junk was too nasty. I usually just spray it
                        with WD-40 and let it soak and slog it off with paper towels. Repeat 2-4
                        times and it's clean :)

                        I actually spray down the table somewhat regularly with WD-40 anyway. I
                        think it helps keep it clean and happy, although I may have fallen for an
                        old wive's tale.
                      • jcborshard
                        ... My brain is fuzzy from trying to figure out how you did this. Any chance of a photo? Thanks! Jerry B
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 3 10:23 AM
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                          --- In mill_drill@yahoogroups.com, "got_milk_eh" <got_milk_eh@y...>
                          wrote:
                          > I used a trailer jack for the up/down
                          > adjustment and have stops at different heights.

                          My brain is fuzzy from trying to figure out how you did this. Any
                          chance of a photo? Thanks! Jerry B
                        • billbryden
                          I too strongly recommend LPS-3. There are several versions of LPS and you want version 3. It sprays on as a thin oil like substance but some of the solvents
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 3 8:45 PM
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                            I too strongly recommend LPS-3. There are several versions of LPS and
                            you want version 3. It sprays on as a thin oil like substance but
                            some of the solvents evaporate and it becomes more waxy. It is a very
                            good product designed specifically for the very purpose Matt has.

                            CRC is a brand and produces a couple dozen different products. Some
                            of the CRC products are spray lubricants and would be inappropriate
                            for providing long term storage protection. CRC's SP-300 and SP-400
                            are the corrosion inhibitors. The 300 remains oily and the 400 dries
                            more waxy and is a better long term protectant. This was probably
                            Jerry's friend's recommendation. Its been a long time since I've used
                            the SP-400 and I didn't use it that much since I am so pleased with
                            LPS-3, so I can't really say how good the 400 is but it is similar to
                            LPS-3 as I recall.

                            WD-40 is great for cleaning off the waxy protectants, but DO NOT use
                            WD-40 to coat the mill to protect it for any duration. WD-40 is a
                            poor corrosion inhibitor. Some of the distillates that initially
                            provide modest corrosion inhibition eventually evaporate and after
                            awhile the remaining ingrediants (those rust busters, penetrants,
                            etc.) actually get a bit corrosive and provides less lubricity. In my
                            shop WD-40 is only used as a cleaner for small tasks since it's in a
                            handy spray can and it's cheap.

                            Bill
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