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33745Re: [mill_drill] Re: Grizzly G1006 Reversing drum switch

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  • Guenther Paul
    Jul 6, 2013
      Druid
      I have 3phase on the pole across the street, The power company will not hook up 3-phase to my property i am zoned
      agricultural-residential  i would need at least a light commercial zoning. Acutely i am fine all my machines i have now run a single phase but that may change ho knows i may get a machine with a 3phase
       
      GP
       motor
      From: Druid Noibn <druid_noibn@...>
      To: "mill_drill@yahoogroups.com" <mill_drill@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, July 6, 2013 4:48 PM
      Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: Grizzly G1006 Reversing drum switch
       
      Hi GP,
       
      Interesting question, one that an engineer is likely to ask <smile>
       
      We see lots of comments on this point, all good of course, but's let's stick with our engineering. 
       
      First - let's consider the approach to get 3-phase power 1) ask the power company to run a 3-phase line to our facilities and a licensed electrician to install the wiring (FYI, in NJ two folks can do the internal wiring on a home - the home owner or a licensed electrician); 2) get a rotary converter; 3) get a static converter; 4) get a VFD.  The last few points "assumes" that one has the appropriate power wired into the shop. 
       
      Item 1 is very good - and can be rather expensive as it depends a lot on what is available in your area.  I would have to pay, to have a power line brought in from a couple of blocks away.  Considering potential use - the utility company would not be eager to do it and it would be expensive. 
       
      Item 2- rotary converters are motor/generators (motoralternators if you wish) - they are very nice and lets one get full 3-pahse power.  Bigger is not always better and some control might be in order - not likley an issue for our needs and they are very reliable.  Probably best to find a good used one, as they can be expensive.
       
      Item 3 - static converters - they are sized to a particular motor size, and supply about 66% of the rated power - use only if forced to.  Look up as to what they really are <smile> - make your own.
       
      Item  4 - VFD - these are adjustable electronically controled converters - takes in AC converts it to DC and converts that back to AC; and are very efficient at doing so.  I'll leave it up to others to look up the specs on a few noting their total power consumption and conversion - they are efficient.  The output is variable, i.e., you can adjust the output such that it will allow the "motor" to vary it speed over a wide range.  It is not generally recommented to run multiple motors concurrently, although it can be done.  DO NOT put a switch, circuit breaket, relay, contactor or other disconnect device between the motor and the VFD.  For those areas when the safety rule demands a disconnect here - read the manual - some system permit a disconnect X milleseconds after interrupting the main power input. Cost...? varies with size of VFD and manufacturer - consider $130-$450 for the ones we typically need 
       
      Now, what the heck does the above have to do with the question? <smile>  
       
      The cost of 3-phase power depends on the approach used and it isn't only the $/KWH but also the cost of equipment needed. 
       
      Why did a fellow like me switch to a 3-phase system when I certainly know that it would not improve my work?  Because, I wanted to - it is a part of the fun I get working in my shop; and it is a part of my learning.  Heck, look at the speed adjustments on typical system, we may have "Low, Medium and High" yet we go a bit crazy discussing SFM (surface feet per minute) cutting speeds; an issue better left for those in production manufacturing. 
       
      I hope the above was of some interest.
       
      Kind regards,
      DBN  

      From: Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...>
      To: "mill_drill@yahoogroups.com" <mill_drill@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, July 5, 2013 11:44 AM
      Subject: Re: [mill_drill] Re: Grizzly G1006 Reversing drum switch
       
      Did you all ever figure the operating cost i mean the cosumtion of elec. to convert single to 3 phase.
       
      GP
      From: wjhaasman <brianomcp@...>
      To: mill_drill@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, July 5, 2013 11:26 AM
      Subject: [mill_drill] Re: Grizzly G1006 Reversing drum switch
       
      What I meant was; Get a 3 phase motor with a phase converter to run on 240V household current then add a VFD for speed control. Cash permitting that is.
       
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