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Re: [milgenire] Re:

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  • Éamann Ó Ruairc
    Jerry, Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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      Jerry,

      Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first paragraph in the top left-hand corner.

      Best wishes,

      Éamann 


      Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:47, gerry white a écrit :

       

      With regard to the term 'Irish Brigade' - John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, made an attempt to form such a unit in 1915. He hoped that the men ( particularly the members of the Volunteer movement) would be able to serve in such a unit. Unfortunately, the British government didn't permit such a unit to be formed (which, in my opinion, was a missed opportunity). However, the term was used in early in 1915 so it was possible that many who joined the British army at this time may have thought that they would have ended up serving in the 'Irish Brigade'.



    • gerry white
      Sounds like an interesting fellow Éamann!  I really do think that my theory miay ideed be the answer to your question as the whole issue of an Irish
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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        Sounds like an interesting fellow Éamann!  I really do think that my theory miay ideed be the answer to your question as the whole issue of an 'Irish Brigade' dominated Irish (and British) political debate early in 1915!
         
        Gerry



        From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
        To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, 19 February, 2011 20:57:00
        Subject: Re: [milgenire] Re:

        Jerry,

        Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first paragraph in the top left-hand corner.

        Best wishes,

        Éamann 


        Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:47, gerry white a écrit :

         

        With regard to the term 'Irish Brigade' - John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, made an attempt to form such a unit in 1915. He hoped that the men ( particularly the members of the Volunteer movement) would be able to serve in such a unit. Unfortunately, the British government didn't permit such a unit to be formed (which, in my opinion, was a missed opportunity). However, the term was used in early in 1915 so it was possible that many who joined the British army at this time may have thought that they would have ended up serving in the 'Irish Brigade'.



        s

      • Éamann Ó Ruairc
        I think you’re right. Thanks again! Éamann ... I think you’re right. Thanks again! Éamann Le 19 févr. 2011 à 22:27, gerry white a écrit : Sounds like
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 20, 2011
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          I think you’re right. 
          Thanks again!
          Éamann

          Le 19 févr. 2011 à 22:27, gerry white a écrit :

          Sounds like an interesting fellow Éamann!  I really do think that my theory miay ideed be the answer to your question as the whole issue of an 'Irish Brigade' dominated Irish (and British) political debate early in 1915!
           
          Gerry



          From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
          To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sat, 19 February, 2011 20:57:00
          Subject: Re: [milgenire] Re:

          Jerry,

          Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first paragraph in the top left-hand corner.

          Best wishes,

          Éamann 

          <Magee Michael Detroit 1947 election pamphlet p2.png>
          Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:47, gerry white a écrit :


          With regard to the term 'Irish Brigade' - John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, made an attempt to form such a unit in 1915. He hoped that the men ( particularly the members of the Volunteer movement) would be able to serve in such a unit. Unfortunately, the British government didn't permit such a unit to be formed (which, in my opinion, was a missed opportunity). However, the term was used in early in 1915 so it was possible that many who joined the British army at this time may have thought that they would have ended up serving in the 'Irish Brigade'.



          s



        • Donnacha
          Hello, Some intriguing evidence of the Irish Brigade from the By Cork Great War Project on Facebook from Guy s Cork Military Directory 1915. It reads as
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 20, 2011
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          Hello,
          Some intriguing evidence of the Irish Brigade from the By Cork Great War Project on Facebook from Guy's Cork Military Directory 1915. It reads as Follows:
           
          16th Irish Division
          Staff Headquarters, Mallow
           
          The Irish Brigade
           
          This Brigade includes Batallions of the
           
          Royal Munster Fusiliers          Leinster Regiment
           
          Connaught Rangers                Royal Irish Regiment
           
          That this formation has a Staff Headquarter suggests that it was far from being a merely informal title adopted from the practice of its member in the way a nickname might develop into extensive general use. The Military Director was produced by the famous directory house Guys a commercial operation not given to loose talk, especially at that time when such matters were conducted with far more rigour than they might be today.
           
          Comments welcome.
           
          Regards,
           
          Donnacha


          --- On Sun, 2/20/11, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

          From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
          Subject: [milgenire] Irish Brigade
          To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Sunday, February 20, 2011, 10:15 AM

           
          I think you’re right. 
          Thanks again!
          Éamann

          Le 19 févr. 2011 à 22:27, gerry white a écrit :

          Sounds like an interesting fellow Éamann!  I really do think that my theory miay ideed be the answer to your question as the whole issue of an 'Irish Brigade' dominated Irish (and British) political debate early in 1915!
           
          Gerry



          From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
          To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sat, 19 February, 2011 20:57:00
          Subject: Re: [milgenire] Re:

          Jerry,

          Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first paragraph in the top left-hand corner.

          Best wishes,

          Éamann 

          <Magee Michael Detroit 1947 election pamphlet p2.png>
          Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:47, gerry white a écrit :


          With regard to the term 'Irish Brigade' - John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, made an attempt to form such a unit in 1915. He hoped that the men ( particularly the members of the Volunteer movement) would be able to serve in such a unit. Unfortunately, the British government didn't permit such a unit to be formed (which, in my opinion, was a missed opportunity). However, the term was used in early in 1915 so it was possible that many who joined the British army at this time may have thought that they would have ended up serving in the 'Irish Brigade'
           

        • Johnny Doyle
          it would appear that 47th Brigade in the 16th (Irish) Division was called The Irish Brigade . In Feb 1916, this comprised : 6th Battn Royal Irish Regt
          Message 5 of 9 , Feb 21, 2011
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            it would appear that 47th Brigade in the 16th (Irish) Division was called "The Irish Brigade". In Feb 1916, this comprised :

            6th Battn Royal Irish Regt (original Co Lt Col FitzR E P Curzon)
            6th Battn Connaught Rangers (original Co Lt Col J S M Lennox Conygham KIA)
            7th Battn Leinster Regt (original Co Lt Col H Wood)
            8th Battn Royal Munster Fusiliers (original Co Lt Col D L Hartley)

            HQ originally at Fermoy, Co Cork. The 6th Connaught Rangers appear to have been recruited from Irish Volunteers in West Belfast and surrounds.

            The above may be the units listed in Donnacha's post.

            The 16th (Irish) also had 48th Brigade and 49th Brigade originally HQ'd at Buttevant, Co Cork and Tipp town respectively.

            2 VCs won by members of 47th Brigade :

            Private Thomas Hughes, 6th Connaught Rangers (he was from Castleblaney,Co Monaghan)
            Lt John Holland, 7th Leinster Regt (he was from Athy, Co Kildare and the Battalion Bombing Officer; originally joined the 2nd Life Guards as a private)

            John


            On 21 Feb 2011, at 04:32, Donnacha <ddgrant2004@...> wrote:

             

            Hello,
            Some intriguing evidence of the Irish Brigade from the By Cork Great War Project on Facebook from Guy's Cork Military Directory 1915. It reads as Follows:
             
            16th Irish Division
            Staff Headquarters, Mallow
             
            The Irish Brigade
             
            This Brigade includes Batallions of the
             
            Royal Munster Fusiliers          Leinster Regiment
             
            Connaught Rangers                Royal Irish Regiment
             
            That this formation has a Staff Headquarter suggests that it was far from being a merely informal title adopted from the practice of its member in the way a nickname might develop into extensive general use. The Military Director was produced by the famous directory house Guys a commercial operation not given to loose talk, especially at that time when such matters were conducted with far more rigour than they might be today.
             
            Comments welcome.
             
            Regards,
             
            Donnacha


            --- On Sun, 2/20/11, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

            From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
            Subject: [milgenire] Irish Brigade
            To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Sunday, February 20, 2011, 10:15 AM

             
            I think you’re right. 
            Thanks again!
            Éamann

            Le 19 févr. 2011 à 22:27, gerry white a écrit :

            Sounds like an interesting fellow Éamann!  I really do think that my theory miay ideed be the answer to your question as the whole issue of an 'Irish Brigade' dominated Irish (and British) political debate early in 1915!
             
            Gerry



            From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
            To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, 19 February, 2011 20:57:00
            Subject: Re: [milgenire] Re:

            Jerry,

            Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first paragraph in the top left-hand corner.

            Best wishes,

            Éamann 

            <Magee Michael Detroit 1947 election pamphlet p2.png>
            Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:47, gerry white a écrit :


            With regard to the term 'Irish Brigade' - John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, made an attempt to form such a unit in 1915. He hoped that the men ( particularly the members of the Volunteer movement) would be able to serve in such a unit. Unfortunately, the British government didn't permit such a unit to be formed (which, in my opinion, was a missed opportunity). However, the term was used in early in 1915 so it was possible that many who joined the British army at this time may have thought that they would have ended up serving in the 'Irish Brigade'
             

          • Éamann Ó Ruairc
            Hi Donnacha! Thank you for the information on where to search in Kew for George Magee’s records. I will not have an opportunity to go to London in the
            Message 6 of 9 , Feb 23, 2011
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              Hi Donnacha!

              Thank you for the information on where to search in Kew for George Magee’s records. I will not have an opportunity to go to London in the foreseeable future, so I will wait patiently for the digitalization to be completed.

              Thank you too for the image about the Irish Brigade.

              Good luck in your own research!

              Éamann

              Le 21 févr. 2011 à 05:32, Donnacha a écrit :

               

              Hello,
              Some intriguing evidence of the Irish Brigade from the By Cork Great War Project on Facebook from Guy's Cork Military Directory 1915. It reads as Follows:
               
              16th Irish Division
              Staff Headquarters, Mallow
               
              The Irish Brigade
               
              This Brigade includes Batallions of the
               
              Royal Munster Fusiliers          Leinster Regiment
               
              Connaught Rangers                Royal Irish Regiment
               
              That this formation has a Staff Headquarter suggests that it was far from being a merely informal title adopted from the practice of its member in the way a nickname might develop into extensive general use. The Military Director was produced by the famous directory house Guys a commercial operation not given to loose talk, especially at that time when such matters were conducted with far more rigour than they might be today.
               
              Comments welcome.
               
              Regards,
               
              Donnacha


              --- On Sun, 2/20/11, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

              From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
              Subject: [milgenire] Irish Brigade
              To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Sunday, February 20, 2011, 10:15 AM

               
              I think you’re right. 
              Thanks again!
              Éamann

              Le 19 févr. 2011 à 22:27, gerry white a écrit :

              Sounds like an interesting fellow Éamann!  I really do think that my theory miay ideed be the answer to your question as the whole issue of an 'Irish Brigade' dominated Irish (and British) political debate early in 1915!
               
              Gerry



              From: Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...>
              To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, 19 February, 2011 20:57:00
              Subject: Re: [milgenire] Re:

              Jerry,

              Thanks very much! That’s a very interesting and plausible explanation. I attach the 1947 document where my grandfather used the term, in the first paragraph in the top left-hand corner.

              Best wishes,

              Éamann 

              <Magee Michael Detroit 1947 election pamphlet p2.png>
              Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:47, gerry white a écrit :


              With regard to the term 'Irish Brigade' - John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, made an attempt to form such a unit in 1915. He hoped that the men ( particularly the members of the Volunteer movement) would be able to serve in such a unit. Unfortunately, the British government didn't permit such a unit to be formed (which, in my opinion, was a missed opportunity). However, the term was used in early in 1915 so it was possible that many who joined the British army at this time may have thought that they would have ended up serving in the 'Irish Brigade'
               


            • e.oruairc
              Dia daoibh arís eile! Last February I asked your help in understanding what my grandfather had meant when he said that he had joined the Irish Brigade in
              Message 7 of 9 , Nov 16, 2011
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                Dia daoibh arís eile!

                Last February I asked your help in understanding what my grandfather had meant when he said that he had joined the "Irish Brigade" in WWI.

                When in Belfast last month I visited the Ulster Museum and saw there a poster in which "Wee" Joe Devlin urged men to join the "Irish Brigade". It is obvious that that is what my grandfather was referring to.

                I have posted a photo of the poster in the "Photos" section.

                Thanks again for all your help!

                Beannachtaí,

                Éamann
              • Donnacha
                You may be interested to learn that there is a Facebook group for all interested in the Irish Brigade. It can be found here:
                Message 8 of 9 , Dec 30, 2011
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                  You may be interested to learn that there is a Facebook group for all interested in the Irish Brigade. It can be found here:

                  http://www.facebook.com/groups/129669510472088/

                  Regards,

                  Donnacha

                  --- On Wed, 11/16/11, e.oruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

                  From: e.oruairc <eamann@...>
                  Subject: [milgenire] Re: The "Irish Brigade"
                  To: milgenire@yahoogroups.com
                  Received: Wednesday, November 16, 2011, 4:16 PM


                  Dia daoibh arís eile!

                  Last February I asked your help in understanding what my grandfather had meant when he said that he had joined the "Irish Brigade" in WWI.

                  When in Belfast last month I visited the Ulster Museum and saw there a poster in which "Wee" Joe Devlin urged men to join the "Irish Brigade". It is obvious that that is what my grandfather was referring to.

                  I have posted a photo of the poster in the "Photos" section.

                  Thanks again for all your help!

                  Beannachtaí,

                  Éamann

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