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WWI "Irish Brigade"?

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  • Éamann Ó Ruairc
    Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello! My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps.
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 18, 2011
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      Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

      My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”. 

      I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.


      Thank you in advance for your comments!

      Beannachtai,

      Éamann 


    • Johnny Doyle
      Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 18, 2011
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        Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1


        No (R)ASC men listed.

        What was your grandad's name and number?

        John


        On 18 Feb 2011, at 09:38, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

         

        Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

        My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”. 

        I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.


        Thank you in advance for your comments!

        Beannachtai,

        Éamann 


      • Éamann Ó Ruairc
        Thank you John for drawing my attention to the existence of an Irish Brigade during WWI! However, my grandfather was certainly not a member of it. My
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 18, 2011
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          Thank you John for drawing my attention to the existence of an Irish Brigade during WWI! However, my grandfather was  certainly not a member of it.

          My grandfather’s name was Michael Magee and his ASC regiment number was M2/081316. Michael's Pension Records show him serving with the 403rd Coy from 16th August 1915 - 16th March 1918. A transfer must have taken place after this date since he was discharged from the 604th Coy ASC. He was injured in an accident in early 1918 and sent home to Belfast.

          It seems clear to me that my grandfather used the expression “Irish Brigade” in a loose fashion, meaning he was among those Irishmen who served in the British army during WWI.

          Éamann



          Le 18 févr. 2011 à 18:27, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

           

          Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1


          No (R)ASC men listed.

          What was your grandad's name and number?

          John


          On 18 Feb 2011, at 09:38, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

           

          Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

          My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”. 

          I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.


          Thank you in advance for your comments!

          Beannachtai,

          Éamann 





        • Johnny Doyle
          having looked at his medal card and pension record, he definitely wasn t in the Irish Brigade recruited by Casement and doesn t appear to have any connection
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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            having looked at his medal card and pension record, he definitely wasn't in the Irish Brigade recruited by Casement and doesn't appear to have any connection to, for example, the Tyneside Irish Brigade nor the "Irish brigades" of the 10th, 16th or 36th Irish Divisions.

            One chap from 403 Motor Transport Company, ASC, with a little bit of unit background :

            http://lancingwarmemorial.blogspot.com/2009/07/burtenshaw-vernon-george.html


            From the Great War Forum :

            "It will not surprise you that 403 MT Company ASC also had a similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 26th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to II ANZAC Heavy Artillery, and later moved to XXII Corps. "

            II Anzac Corps was redesignated British 22nd Corps in 1917 so much of Michael's time in France may have been with Australians and New Zealanders.

            John


            At 21:39 18/02/2011, Éamann Ó Ruairc wrote:
             

            Thank you John for drawing my attention to the existence of an Irish Brigade during WWI! However, my grandfather was  certainly not a member of it.

            My grandfather’s name was Michael Magee and his ASC regiment number was M2/081316. Michael's Pension Records show him serving with the 403rd Coy from 16th August 1915 - 16th March 1918. A transfer must have taken place after this date since he was discharged from the 604th Coy ASC. He was injured in an accident in early 1918 and sent home to Belfast.

            It seems clear to me that my grandfather used the expression “Irish Brigade” in a loose fashion, meaning he was among those Irishmen who served in the British army during WWI.

            Éamann



            Le 18 févr. 2011 à 18:27, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

             

            Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1

            http://www.irishbrigade.eu/recruits-irish-brigade.html

            No (R)ASC men listed.

            What was your grandad's name and number?

            John


            On 18 Feb 2011, at 09:38, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

             

            Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

            My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”.

            I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.

            Thank you in advance for your comments!

            Beannachtai,

            Éamann



          • Éamann Ó Ruairc
            Hi John! Thank’s for the additional information! You mention my grandfather’s pension record. Where did you find that? Ancestry? FMP? Kew? I’d be keen to
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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              Hi John!

              Thank’s for the additional information!

              You mention my grandfather’s pension record. Where did you find that? Ancestry? FMP? Kew? I’d be keen to get a copy!

              I’m writing to my grandfather’s surviving son in America to ask him if he ever heard of the “Irish Brigade”. Unfortunately his father died in 1954 when he was a young boy so the chances are slim.

              I read elsewhere that FMY is digitalising the WO/95 files. I look forward to being able to consult the diary of Michael’s unit.

              As regards my g-grandfather, Michael’s father, George Magee, I checked out the Green Howards Museum and I see that they are asking £30 per enquiry. I’ll consult them about the medal only as a last recourse.

              Thanks again for all your helpful comments!

              Éamann

              Le 19 févr. 2011 à 09:32, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

               


              having looked at his medal card and pension record, he definitely wasn't in the Irish Brigade recruited by Casement and doesn't appear to have any connection to, for example, the Tyneside Irish Brigade nor the "Irish brigades" of the 10th, 16th or 36th Irish Divisions.

              One chap from 403 Motor Transport Company, ASC, with a little bit of unit background :

              http://lancingwarmemorial.blogspot.com/2009/07/burtenshaw-vernon-george.html


              From the Great War Forum :

              "It will not surprise you that 403 MT Company ASC also had a similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 26th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to II ANZAC Heavy Artillery, and later moved to XXII Corps. "

              II Anzac Corps was redesignated British 22nd Corps in 1917 so much of Michael's time in France may have been with Australians and New Zealanders.

              John


              At 21:39 18/02/2011, Éamann Ó Ruairc wrote:

               

              Thank you John for drawing my attention to the existence of an Irish Brigade during WWI! However, my grandfather was  certainly not a member of it.

              My grandfather’s name was Michael Magee and his ASC regiment number was M2/081316. Michael's Pension Records show him serving with the 403rd Coy from 16th August 1915 - 16th March 1918. A transfer must have taken place after this date since he was discharged from the 604th Coy ASC. He was injured in an accident in early 1918 and sent home to Belfast.

              It seems clear to me that my grandfather used the expression “Irish Brigade” in a loose fashion, meaning he was among those Irishmen who served in the British army during WWI.

              Éamann



              Le 18 févr. 2011 à 18:27, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

               

              Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1

              http://www.irishbrigade.eu/recruits-irish-brigade.html

              No (R)ASC men listed.

              What was your grandad's name and number?

              John


              On 18 Feb 2011, at 09:38, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

               

              Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

              My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”.

              I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.

              Thank you in advance for your comments!

              Beannachtai,

              Éamann





            • Johnny Doyle
              Eamann, the pension record is on Ancestry. His Medal Index Card shows he was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal campaign
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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                Eamann,

                the pension record is on Ancestry. 

                His Medal Index Card shows he was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal campaign medals. Entered France 18/8/1915. Demobilised to the Class Z Reserve 18/6/1919.

                Pension record states he enlisted 28/4/1915 in Belfast. Home address 35 Albert St, Belfast. Born 1895. Trade = Chauffeur; I think with Harland and Wolfe. Also mention of being a fitter.

                23 on discharge. Married 27/3/1918 in Belfast .

                John


                On 19 Feb 2011, at 16:36, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

                 

                Hi John!


                Thank’s for the additional information!

                You mention my grandfather’s pension record. Where did you find that? Ancestry? FMP? Kew? I’d be keen to get a copy!

                I’m writing to my grandfather’s surviving son in America to ask him if he ever heard of the “Irish Brigade”. Unfortunately his father died in 1954 when he was a young boy so the chances are slim.

                I read elsewhere that FMY is digitalising the WO/95 files. I look forward to being able to consult the diary of Michael’s unit.

                As regards my g-grandfather, Michael’s father, George Magee, I checked out the Green Howards Museum and I see that they are asking £30 per enquiry. I’ll consult them about the medal only as a last recourse.

                Thanks again for all your helpful comments!

                Éamann

                Le 19 févr. 2011 à 09:32, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

                 


                having looked at his medal card and pension record, he definitely wasn't in the Irish Brigade recruited by Casement and doesn't appear to have any connection to, for example, the Tyneside Irish Brigade nor the "Irish brigades" of the 10th, 16th or 36th Irish Divisions.

                One chap from 403 Motor Transport Company, ASC, with a little bit of unit background :

                http://lancingwarmemorial.blogspot.com/2009/07/burtenshaw-vernon-george.html


                From the Great War Forum :

                "It will not surprise you that 403 MT Company ASC also had a similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 26th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to II ANZAC Heavy Artillery, and later moved to XXII Corps. "

                II Anzac Corps was redesignated British 22nd Corps in 1917 so much of Michael's time in France may have been with Australians and New Zealanders.

                John


                At 21:39 18/02/2011, Éamann Ó Ruairc wrote:

                 

                Thank you John for drawing my attention to the existence of an Irish Brigade during WWI! However, my grandfather was  certainly not a member of it.

                My grandfather’s name was Michael Magee and his ASC regiment number was M2/081316. Michael's Pension Records show him serving with the 403rd Coy from 16th August 1915 - 16th March 1918. A transfer must have taken place after this date since he was discharged from the 604th Coy ASC. He was injured in an accident in early 1918 and sent home to Belfast.

                It seems clear to me that my grandfather used the expression “Irish Brigade” in a loose fashion, meaning he was among those Irishmen who served in the British army during WWI.

                Éamann



                Le 18 févr. 2011 à 18:27, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

                 

                Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1

                http://www.irishbrigade.eu/recruits-irish-brigade.html

                No (R)ASC men listed.

                What was your grandad's name and number?

                John


                On 18 Feb 2011, at 09:38, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

                 

                Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

                My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”.

                I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.

                Thank you in advance for your comments!

                Beannachtai,

                Éamann





              • Éamann Ó Ruairc
                John, Thank you very much! I’ll contact a friend who has a subscription with Ancestry (mine ended several months ago) and ask her if she would download the
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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                  John,

                  Thank you very much! 

                  I’ll contact a friend who has a subscription with Ancestry (mine ended several months ago) and ask her if she would download the images for me. I already have his MIC.

                  You might be interested to hear that my grandfather emigrated to Redcar, in England, in 1919, became involved in the trade union movement, took part in the 1926 General Strike, emigrated to Detroit, where he spent the rest of his life at Ford Motor Works, part of the time as a worker, part of the time as a trade union official. He stood for election to Detroit City Council in 1947 (it was on his electoral hand-out that he mentions having been in the “Irish Brigade”) and for the US Senate a year later. He figures in this “Life Magazine” article (where he is described as “right winger” because he opposed the Communists):


                  Thanks again for the valuable information you have been able to give me!

                  Éamann 
                  Le 19 févr. 2011 à 20:35, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

                   

                  Eamann,

                  the pension record is on Ancestry. 

                  His Medal Index Card shows he was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal campaign medals. Entered France 18/8/1915. Demobilised to the Class Z Reserve 18/6/1919.

                  Pension record states he enlisted 28/4/1915 in Belfast. Home address 35 Albert St, Belfast. Born 1895. Trade = Chauffeur; I think with Harland and Wolfe. Also mention of being a fitter.

                  23 on discharge. Married 27/3/1918 in Belfast .

                  John


                  On 19 Feb 2011, at 16:36, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

                   

                  Hi John!


                  Thank’s for the additional information!

                  You mention my grandfather’s pension record. Where did you find that? Ancestry? FMP? Kew? I’d be keen to get a copy!

                  I’m writing to my grandfather’s surviving son in America to ask him if he ever heard of the “Irish Brigade”. Unfortunately his father died in 1954 when he was a young boy so the chances are slim.

                  I read elsewhere that FMY is digitalising the WO/95 files. I look forward to being able to consult the diary of Michael’s unit.

                  As regards my g-grandfather, Michael’s father, George Magee, I checked out the Green Howards Museum and I see that they are asking £30 per enquiry. I’ll consult them about the medal only as a last recourse.

                  Thanks again for all your helpful comments!

                  Éamann

                  Le 19 févr. 2011 à 09:32, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

                   


                  having looked at his medal card and pension record, he definitely wasn't in the Irish Brigade recruited by Casement and doesn't appear to have any connection to, for example, the Tyneside Irish Brigade nor the "Irish brigades" of the 10th, 16th or 36th Irish Divisions.

                  One chap from 403 Motor Transport Company, ASC, with a little bit of unit background :

                  http://lancingwarmemorial.blogspot.com/2009/07/burtenshaw-vernon-george.html


                  From the Great War Forum :

                  "It will not surprise you that 403 MT Company ASC also had a similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 26th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to II ANZAC Heavy Artillery, and later moved to XXII Corps. "

                  II Anzac Corps was redesignated British 22nd Corps in 1917 so much of Michael's time in France may have been with Australians and New Zealanders.

                  John


                  At 21:39 18/02/2011, Éamann Ó Ruairc wrote:

                   

                  Thank you John for drawing my attention to the existence of an Irish Brigade during WWI! However, my grandfather was  certainly not a member of it.

                  My grandfather’s name was Michael Magee and his ASC regiment number was M2/081316. Michael's Pension Records show him serving with the 403rd Coy from 16th August 1915 - 16th March 1918. A transfer must have taken place after this date since he was discharged from the 604th Coy ASC. He was injured in an accident in early 1918 and sent home to Belfast.

                  It seems clear to me that my grandfather used the expression “Irish Brigade” in a loose fashion, meaning he was among those Irishmen who served in the British army during WWI.

                  Éamann



                  Le 18 févr. 2011 à 18:27, Johnny Doyle a écrit :

                   

                  Corisande from the Great War Forum/Rootschat has done quite a bit of research on the Irish Brigade from WW1

                  http://www.irishbrigade.eu/recruits-irish-brigade.html

                  No (R)ASC men listed.

                  What was your grandad's name and number?

                  John


                  On 18 Feb 2011, at 09:38, Éamann Ó Ruairc <eamann@...> wrote:

                   

                  Dia daoibh uilig! / Hello!

                  My grandfather enlisted in the British army in August 1915. A motor mechanic by trade, he served in the (Royal) Army Service Corps. He later emigrated to America and in a curriculum vitae he wrote in 1947 he said that in WWI he had joined "the Irish Brigade”.

                  I have never heard of such a formation in the context of WWI. I assume that, for whatever reason, my grandfather coined that expression but I thought I would post a query about it here on the forum in case I am wrong.

                  Thank you in advance for your comments!

                  Beannachtai,

                  Éamann








                • Maureen Stewart
                  Eamann, Emerald Ancestors give Michael Magee marrying Agnes Ellen O Kane in Belfast. on 27 march 1918. Roman Catholic Belfast Urban 15 According to Rootsweb
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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                    Eamann,
                     
                    Emerald Ancestors give Michael Magee marrying Agnes Ellen O'Kane in Belfast. on 27 march 1918.  Roman Catholic  Belfast Urban 15
                     
                    According to Rootsweb Urban 15 encompasses following streets and area : - Divis Street, May Street, Joy Street, Bosnia Street.
                     
                    HTH
                     
                    Maureen
                  • Éamann Ó Ruairc
                    Maureen, Thank you very much! As you can see from John’s reply my granny’s address was in Albert Street. On their wedding certificate he gave Pine Street
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 19, 2011
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                      Maureen,

                      Thank you very much! As you can see from John’s reply my granny’s address was in Albert Street. On their wedding certificate he gave Pine Street as his address.

                      I appreciate you going to trouble of looking that up for me!

                      Best wishes in your own research!

                      Éamann 

                      Le 19 févr. 2011 à 21:39, Maureen Stewart a écrit :

                       

                      Eamann,
                       
                      Emerald Ancestors give Michael Magee marrying Agnes Ellen O'Kane in Belfast. on 27 march 1918.  Roman Catholic  Belfast Urban 15
                       
                      According to Rootsweb Urban 15 encompasses following streets and area : - Divis Street, May Street, Joy Street, Bosnia Street.
                       
                      HTH
                       
                      Maureen


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