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some of your recent published letters to the editor : KS, OH, CA, CO., WI.,IN., ID,MI., IA., VA (through 04/05)

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  • Genie Hayes
    LETTERS 1,227 words, B1, 4, English 14 March 2005 The Kansas City Star Copyright (c) 2005, The Kansas City Star. All rights reserved. FairTax Kudos to Federal
    Message 1 of 1 , May 3, 2005

      LETTERS

      1,227 words, B1, 4, English
      14 March 2005
      The
      Kansas City Star
      Copyright (c) 2005, The
      Kansas City Star. All rights reserved.

      FairTax

      Kudos to Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan and former Secretary of State James Baker. In recent comments to the President's Panel on Tax Reform, both came out in favor of a consumption tax.

      That's a great idea, as long as we don't make the mistake the Europeans did and add it to our current income tax. Europe found that's the way to stifle an economy.

      The FairTax proposal would solve the problem. It repeals the income tax, the regressive FICA tax, capital gains taxes, death taxes and more. FairTax is consumption based -- taxing only new goods and services -- and it provides a "prebate" to every household to assure that no one pays tax on necessities.

      All taxpayers keep 100 percent of their income.

      There's so much more about FairTax (www.fairtax.org) that is great for the economy and for us all.

      Sunnye Tiedemann, Overland Park

      Document KCST000020050314e13e000dj

      Change requires FairTax nod

      14 March 2005
      Dayton Daily News
      Copyright (c) 2005 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

      PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH HAS ANNOUNCED HIS tax reform commission selections. It is time for the president and our members of Congress to hear our voices. We must call for a fair tax system. How many of us really look forward to April 15 each year, versus fearing IRS audits based on responses to 1040 form questions we did not fully understand?

      How many more pay "experts" to answer for us to gain that peace of mind that all is correct? Why must we, as a nation, spend over $550 billion each year making sure that we are complying with this intricate mess of over 60,000 pages of tax code? Is this not one of the main reasons our jobs are heading overseas, even with "American" companies?

      Change is due. We need a tax system that is simple and fair. Simple like the state sales tax. You just pay when you spend. No forms, no hassles, and the collection systems exist now. Fair, no taxes on necessities like food, and progressive, the more you spend the more you pay.

      Our competitiveness, job numbers, and economic success will soar after eliminating income and payroll taxes and the IRS. Please take a look at the FairTax proposal before Congress right now. U.S. Rep. John Linder first introduced the FairTax proposal (HR 25) during last session, that will likely be reintroduced this session.

      It was created, complying with the needs and desires of the American people, regardless of political or economic affiliations, after a decade of research. As citizens and voters, we must make our voices heard on the FairTax and keep the momentum for the Fair-Tax revolution growing.

      KEVIN MCDERMOTT , Moraine

      Opinion; B

      Your voice

      Readers, B7, 738 words, English
      14 March 2005
      The Desert Sun
      (c) Copyright 2005, The Desert Sun. All Rights Reserved.

      Proposed consumption tax: I love it

      As a frequent desert visitor and Desert Sun reader, I was glad to see mention of the consumption tax getting some play.

      The proposal, HR/S25, is not only progressive but it is exceedingly fair and transparent and, as long as some media folks keep their heads buried in the sand about the true cost of the present tax system, the public will continue to be ill informed about this piece of fair tax legislation.

      Note that corporations only remit taxes at present, they do not pay them. Tax costs to businesses are directly passed on to the consumer in the 22 percent (conservative estimated) cost of the goods we buy.

      The sales tax proposal simply takes that 22 percent and makes it transparent but it allows you to retain your full paycheck and it eliminates 40,000 pages of tax code that not one of us can fully comprehend.

      Let's continue to give this sales tax idea a fair perusal. Like a "dry heat." I love it.

      Herb Moran, Chula Vista

       

      Commentary/Editorial

      LETTERS

      947 words, FINAL, 35A, English
      15 March 2005
      Rocky Mountain News
       Copyright (c) 2005 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

      Americans nationwide heard recently that Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan supported a national sales tax. He admits that if starting from scratch, the sales tax is the way to go. He is absolutely right!

      The complexity, inefficiency and unfairness of the current system is obvious. I personally support replacing the income tax, the payroll tax, capital gains taxes, death taxes, and the hidden corporate income tax with the FairTax, a proposal represented in the House and Senate by HR 25 and S 25.

      Under the FairTax, there is no more income or payroll tax. Everyone would keep his entire paycheck. Folks will no longer have to keep documents, fill out and file forms, and suffer audits and penalties (civil and criminal) from the IRS. We will get our privacy back.

      Under the FairTax, no American citizen pays any tax up to the poverty level. The FairTax package (www.fairtax.org) has a key component designed to protect the poor, fixed-income, and middle class, where every of resident American with a legal Social Security number qualifies for a rebate. This makes it unique from any other national sales tax and it makes it progressive.

      Currently, about 22 percent of the cost of the goods and services you purchase contain hidden taxes (corporate income and others).

      The FairTax ends that. After you strip out those taxes and then you add back the sales tax, prices will stay virtually the same! I also like that under the FairTax the underground economy will finally pay their fair share.

      Pay as you go, keep all of your paycheck, everyone pays based on what they spend. I like it!

      Chuck Shell, Denver

      Document RMTN000020050315e13f0001x

       

       

       

       

      LETTERS

      Readers, Opinion; A6, English
      725 words
      15 March 2005
      Daily Tribune (Wis.)
       (c) Copyright 2005, Daily Tribune. All Rights Reserved.

      FairTax can solve problems

      I've been thinking about taxes this time of year as I work on our income tax.

      It was good to hear what Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan and former Secretary of State James Baker had to say. Both, in their comments to the President's Panel on Tax Reform, came out in favor of a consumption tax.

      That's a great idea as long as we don't make the mistake the Europeans did and add it to our current income tax. Europe found that's the way to stifle an economy.

      How can we replace the income tax?

      The FairTax proposal would solve the problem. It repeals the income tax, the regressive FICA tax, capital gains taxes, death taxes and more. FairTax is consumption based - taxing only new goods and services and it provides a "prebate" to every household to assure that no one pays tax on necessities.

      Social Security, Medicare and current government entitlement programs will not be positively affected. Everyone keeps 100 percent of their income (minus state taxes).

      There's so much more about FairTax that is great for the economy and for us all. It can be checked out at fairtax.org or telephone 1-800-fairtax #137.

      FRANCIS CHERNEY, Milladore

      Document DTWI000020050316e13f0000l

       

       

       

      PERSPECTIVE
      OPINION

      LETTERS

      868 words, Final Edition, A, English
      15 March 2005
      Journal Gazette
      (c) Copyright 2005,
      Fort Wayne Journal Gazette.

      National sales tax beats current system

      Although President Bush declared his intention to spend his political capital on fixing Social Security and reforming taxes in his final term, the focus so far has been on Social Security. Bush has committed the tax issue to a special panel with instructions to come up with something good and explain it to him this summer.

      And now Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan has told the panel that tax reform is more important than fixing Social Security and that the best reform would be replacement of the income tax by a national consumption tax.

      I heartily agree. I am a senior citizen with income less than $20,000 per year, so it might shock national talk show hosts and populist politicians who keep telling us how bad a sales tax would be for low-income folks because it's regressive. The disconnect here is that those pundits are wrong. I would welcome replacement of the income tax by the sales tax as embodied in House Bill HR25, not only for the good of the American economy, but also because of its narrow personal advantage to me as a low-income taxpayer.

      Greenspan added that "pitching toward a pure consumption tax would arouse such opposition as to make the idea infeasible." He's right. There seems to be an army of people who benefit from the income tax code. For them, the more massive, arcane, convoluted and unfair the code, the better.

      Many ordinary taxpayers are opposed to a national sales tax. A Harris poll taken in 1998 shows that a majority of taxpayers, while hating the complicated U.S. income tax, still want whatever crumbs fall to them - mortgage deduction, state and local tax deduction - in preference to a sales tax. Those folks should inform themselves how HR25 overcomes objections that could be raised to a raw sales tax. Go to www.fairtax.org on the Net.

      STANLEY CLAUSS

      Fort Wayne

       

      EDITORIAL & COMMENT
      Letters To The Editor

      FAIRTAX PROPOSAL WOULD BE FAIR TO ALL

      320 words, Home Final, 6A, English

      16 March 2005
      The Columbus Dispatch
      (c) 2005 Columbus Dispatch. All Rights Reserved.

      The case for tax reform picked up a new advocate this week when Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan spoke with the President's Advisory Panel on Tax Reform and pointed out how a consumption tax could spur economic growth. Though Greenspan did not refer to a specific plan, the FairTax plan (House Resolution 25, Senate Bill 25) meets every criterion and solves most every problem mentioned in his testimony: fairness, simplicity and predictability, and it ends all taxation on capital, the driver of economic expansion.

      Others have suggested a combination of different forms of taxation such as the French value-added tax. But that would be in direct violation of Greenspan's advice to make all things visible. Value-added taxes are levied throughout the manufacturing process and are hidden in retail prices, thus building a playground for special-interest groups. Some suggest a flat tax, but it is a tax on income, not consumption. The Canadians added a consumption tax while keeping their income tax, and the results were disastrous.

      Dale Jorgenson, former chairman of Harvard University's economics department, forecast a 10.5 percent growth in domestic product in the first year after enactment of the FairTax. Over the past decade, FairTax.org has spent more than $22 million on research with other top institutions, which delivered similar expansion predictions. This growth would have enormous positive implications for the federal deficit and the job-creation picture, among others.

      Ultimately, the FairTax is the only replacement plan for our burdensome income tax and Social Security tax that is open, accountable, simple to understand, fair to all Americans (95 percent of all Americans pay less taxes), while promoting economic growth.

      For more information, call 1-800-FAIRTAX, or visit www.fairtax.org , then write your congressmen and say you want the FairTax.

      DONALD CULP

      Columbus

      Document CLMB000020050316e13g0000a

      Editorial

      Letters to the Editor

      1,575 words, 6, English

      16 March 2005
      The Idaho Statesman
      (c) Copyright 2005, The Idaho Statesman. All Rights Reserved.

       

      Imagine a fair tax

      It’s time to take a hard look at our national income tax system and the debilitating effect it has had on our economy and us. It’s time to scrap the IRS for a fair system of taxation.

      Please hear me out. The fairest bill is HR 25, otherwise known as the FairTax. For more information on the fair tax, please go to www.fairtax.org.

      The FairTax is a nonpartisan national sales-tax proposal that would replace all federal income taxes. These include personal, estate, gift, self-employment, alternative minimum, capital gains, FICA, and corporate and death taxes. Americans spend approximately $250 billion to $500 billion every year in income-tax compliance costs.

      Imagine not reporting your income, eliminating mountains of paperwork, or firing your accountant. Imagine keeping everything you earn. Imagine no audits. Imagine the economy surging ahead. Many years of effort, plus millions of dollars invested have gone into the FairTax to come up with a fair system. Don’t take my word -- go to www.fairtax.org. I strongly urge you to research and contact your representatives and encourage them to support HR 25 and SB 25. Do something for yourselves, your children and grandchildren: Scrap the IRS.

      Blayne Sukut, Nampa

      Document BSID000020050317e13g00007

       

       

       

       

      Editorial

      Public Pulse

      Special to The Press
      1,032 words, A10, English, All Editions

      18 March 2005
      The Grand Rapids Press
      Copyright (c) 2005 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

      A national sales tax

      Americans nationwide heard this week that the Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan was supporting a national sales tax.

      He admits that the sales tax is the way to go. He is right! The complexity, inefficiency and unfairness of the current system is obvious.

      I personally support replacing the income tax, the payroll tax, capital gains taxes, death taxes, and the hidden corporate income tax with the FairTax bills that are both in the House and Senate. The FairTax replaces all federal income or payroll tax. You won't have to keep documents, fill out and file forms, and suffer audits and penalties (civil and criminal) from the IRS. We will get our privacy back.

      Under the FairTax, no American citizen pays any tax up to the poverty level. The FairTax package has a key component designed to protect the poor, fixed-income, and middle class, where every resident American qualifies for a rebate. This makes it unique from any other national sales tax and it makes it progressive. After you strip out hidden taxes, even with the sales tax -- prices will stay virtually the same!

      I also like that under the FairTax the underground economy will finally pay their fair share. Pay as you go. Keep your paycheck. Everyone pays based on what they spend. I like it! The Founders will once again be smiling when April 15 is just another day.

      MIKE DICKSON/South Haven

      Document GRPR000020050324e13i000dx

       

       

       

       

      Open Letters

      Staff
      Readers
      1,602 words, Opinion, A6, English

      18 March 2005
      Stevens Point Journal
      (c) Copyright 2005, Stevens Point Journal. All Rights Reserved.

      Consumption tax a great idea

      I've been thinking about taxes this time of year as I work on our income tax.

      It was good to hear what Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan and former Secretary of State James Baker had to say! Both, in their comments to the President's Panel on Tax Reform last week, came out in favor of a consumption tax.

      That's a great idea as long as we don't make the mistake the Europeans did and add it to our current income tax. Europe found that's the way to stifle an economy. How can we replace the income tax?

      The FairTax proposal would solve the problem. It repeals the income tax, the regressive FICA tax, capital gains taxes, death taxes and more. FairTax is consumption based - taxing only new goods and services - and it provides a "prebate" to every household to assure that no one pays tax on necessities.

      Social Security, Medicare and current government entitlement programs will not be positively affected. Everyone keeps 100 percent of their income (minus state taxes).

      There's so much more about FairTax that is great for the economy and for us all. It can be checked out at fairtax.org or telephone 800-fairtax#137.

      Francis Cherney

      Milladore

      Document STVN000020050325e13i0000c

       

       

      Letters to the Editor

      The Tribune
      735 words, English

      19 March 2005
      The
      San Luis Obispo Tribune
      (c) Copyright 2005, The
      San Luis Obispo Tribune. All Rights Reserved.

      Try taxing consumption

      Kudos to Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan and former Secretary of State James Baker.

      In their comments to the president's Panel on Tax Reform, both recently came out in favor of a consumption tax.

      That's a great idea, as long as we don't make the mistake the Europeans did and add it to our current income tax. Europe found that's the way to stifle an economy.

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