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RE: [midkar] Results of "Can You Guess This Song"

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  • KevinKienlein.com
    Thanks kk _____ From: midkar@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midkar@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary Rogers Sent: Monday, April 23, 2012 4:12 PM To:
    Message 1 of 26 , Apr 23 4:29 PM
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      Thanks kk

       


      From: midkar@yahoogroups.com [mailto: midkar@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Gary Rogers
      Sent: Monday, April 23, 2012 4:12 PM
      To: midkar@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [midkar] Results of "Can You Guess This Song"

       

       

      Yes, Kevin. This is for “Guess This Song #8” (guess_this_song8_gr.mid) posted Sunday 4/22/2012.

       

      Gary

       

       

      Sent: Monday, April 23, 2012 6:05 PM

      Subject: RE: [midkar] Results of "Can You Guess This Song"

       

       

      Is this for #8??? kk


      From: midkar@yahoogroups.com [mailto: midkar@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Gary Rogers
      Sent: Monday, April 23, 2012 10:21 AM
      To: Midkar
      Subject: [midkar] Results of "Can You Guess This Song"

       

      The Title and Artist for “Can You Guess This Song” this past week were:

      Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In) by Kenny Rogers And The First Edition

      "Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)" is a song written by Mickey Newbury. Said to reflect the LSD experience,

      the song was intended to be a warning against the danger of using LSD. First recorded in 1967 by Jerry Lee Lewis, who rejected it, it was a hit

      for The First Edition (with Kenny Rogers on lead vocals) in 1968. It was Rogers ' first top ten hit in the Billboard charts, but was not typical of

      the country folk harmonies that characterized most of The First Edition's catalog.

      The song features Rogers on lead vocals and was the group's second single from the band's eponymous album The First Edition. Producer Mike

      Post reversed a few riffs to create the intro, and the solo played by Glen Campbell was heavily compressed and used a tremolo effect to achieve

      its sound. Another studio guitarist, Mike Deasy, provided the acoustic lead guitar parts.

      When Rogers signed to United Artists Records in the mid-1970s after the group split, he re-recorded the track for his Ten Years of Gold album.

      The song is featured in a dream sequence from the Coen Brothers' 1998 film The Big Lebowski, plays during the end credits of the 2000 video game

      Driver 2 and features in 2010 action movie Faster.

      A cover version of the song appears on the album Welcome to Carcass Cuntry by Jeff Walker Und Die Fluffers (former lead singer of Carcass).

      Another cover version of the song appears on the original motion picture soundtrack for the film Soul Men by Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings.

      I received 4 responses to this song. I am including the Moderators because they have no idea in advance

      what song I am posting.

      This song and artist were named correctly by the following people. They are listed in the order I received their email.

      1. Wayne Knazek

      2. Mike Wilson

      3. Derek

      Thanks to all that participated.

      I sincerely hope you have fun with "Guess This Song".

      Gary

    • Ron Tilden
      O Dio Mio Words and Music by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning Performed by Annette Funicello (1960) Peaked at #10 on the Billboards in 1960.   I hope you enjoy it.
      Message 2 of 26 , Apr 24 5:33 PM
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        O Dio Mio
        Words and Music by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning
        Performed by Annette Funicello (1960)
        Peaked at #10 on the Billboards in 1960.
         
        I hope you enjoy it.
        Ron
         
        Annette Joanne Funicello (born October 22, 1942) is an American singer and actress. She was Walt Disney's most popular cast member of the original Mickey Mouse Club, and went on to appear in a series of beach party films.
         
        Early life and early stardom
        Annette Joanne Funicello was born in Utica, New York, to Italian-Americans Joseph and Virginia Funicello. Her family moved to Southern California when she was four years old. Funicello took dancing and music lessons as a child to overcome shyness. In 1955, the 12-year-old was discovered by Walt Disney when she performed as the Swan Queen in Swan Lake at a dance recital in Burbank, California. Disney cast her as one of the original "Mouseketeers". She was the last to be selected, and the only one personally picked by Walt Disney himself. She proved to be very popular and by the end of the first season of Mickey Mouse Club, she was receiving 6,000 letters a month, according to her Disney Legends biography.
        In addition to appearing in many Mouseketeer sketches and dance routines, Funicello starred in several serials on The Mickey Mouse Club. These included Adventure in Dairyland, Walt Disney Presents: Annette (which co-starred Richard Deacon), and the second and third Spin and Marty serials - The Further Adventures of Spin and Marty and The New Adventures of Spin and Marty. In a hayride scene in the Annette serial, she performed the song that launched her singing career. The studio received so much mail about "How Will I Know My Love" (lyrics by Tom Adair, music by Frances Jeffords and William Walsh), that Walt Disney issued it as a single, and gave Funicello (somewhat unwillingly) a recording contract.
         
        Actress and singer
        After the Mickey Mouse Club, she remained under contract with Disney for a time, with television roles in Zorro, Elfego Baca and The Horsemasters. For Zorro she played Anita Campillo in a three-episode storyline about a teen-aged girl who arrives in Los Angeles to visit a father who does not seem to exist. This role was reportedly a birthday present from Walt Disney, and the first of two different characters played opposite Guy Williams as Zorro. Annette also co-starred in Disney-produced movies such as The Shaggy Dog, Babes in Toyland, The Misadventures of Merlin Jones, and The Monkey's Uncle.
        Although uncomfortable being thought of as a singer, Annette had a number of pop record hits in the late 1950s and early 1960s, mostly written by the Sherman Brothers and including: "Tall Paul," "First Name Initial," "O Dio Mio," "Train of Love" (written by Paul Anka) and "Pineapple Princess." They were released by Disney's Buena Vista label. Annette also recorded "It's Really Love" in 1959, a reworking of an earlier Paul Anka song called "Toot Sweet"; Anka reworked the song for a third time in 1962 as "Johnny's Theme" and it opened The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson on television for the next three decades. In an episode of the Disney anthology television series titled "Disneyland After Dark," Annette can be seen singing live at Disneyland. Walt Disney was reportedly a fan of 1950s pop star Teresa Brewer and tried to pattern Annette's singing in the same style. However, Funicello credits "the Annette sound" to her record producer, Tutti Camarata, who worked for Disney in that era. Camarata had her double-track her vocals, matching her first track as closely as possible on the second recording to achieve a fuller sound than her voice would otherwise produce.  Early in her career, she appeared on the NBC interview program Here's Hollywood.
         
        Beach icon and spokeswoman
        She moved on from Disney to become a teen idol, starring in a series of "Beach Party" movies with Frankie Avalon for American International Pictures. These included Beach Party, Muscle Beach Party, Bikini Beach, Beach Blanket Bingo, How to Stuff a Wild Bikini and Pajama Party.
        When she was cast in her first beach movie, Walt Disney requested that she only wear modest bathing suits and keep her navel covered. However, she wore a pink two-piece in Beach Party, a white two-piece fishnet suit in the second film (Muscle Beach Party) and a blue and white bikini in the third (Bikini Beach). All three swimsuits bared her navel, particularly in Bikini Beach, where it is visible extensively during close up shots in a sequence early in the film when she meets Frankie Avalon's "Potato Bug" character outside his tent.
        She and Avalon became iconic as "beach picture" stars and were re-united in 1987 for the Paramount film Back to the Beach, parodying their own surf-and-sand films two decades earlier. They toured the country as a singing act.
        In 1979, Funicello began starring in a series of television commercials for Skippy peanut butter.

        Personal

        Funicello was married to her first husband, Jack Gilardi, from 1965 until 1981. They had three children: Gina (b. 1966), Jack, Jr. (b. 1970), and Jason (b. 1974). In 1986, she married California harness racing horse breeder/trainer Glen Holt.[2] Annette and Glen were frequently seen at Los Alamitos Race Course and at Fairplex in Pomona in the 1980s and 1990s attending harness horse races.

        In 1987, Annette reunited with Frankie Avalon for a series of promotional concerts to promote their film Back to the Beach. She began to suffer from dizzy spells, but kept her failing health from her family.
        Funicello announced in 1992 that she suffers from multiple sclerosis.  She had kept her condition a secret for many years, but felt it necessary to go public to combat rumors that her impaired ability to walk was the result of alcoholism. That same year, she was inducted as a Disney Legend. In 1993, she opened the Annette Funicello Fund for Neurological Disorders at the California Community Foundation.
        Funicello's best friend is Shelley Fabares. She and Fabares have been friends since they were young teenagers in a catechism class, and Fabares was a bridesmaid at Funicello's first wedding. She is also very close to fellow Mouseketeers Sharon Baird, Doreen Tracey, and her "Beach" movies co-star, Frankie Avalon.
        Her autobiography, published in 1994, is A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes: My Story. The title is taken from a song from the Disney movie Cinderella. A made-for-TV movie based on the book, A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes: The Annette Funicello Story, was made in 1995. In the final scene, the actress portraying Funicello (Eva LaRue), riding in a wheelchair, is turned away from the camera — turning back, it is Funicello herself, who delivers a message to a group of children. During this period she also produced her own line of teddy bears for the Annette Funicello Collectible Bear Company.[2] The last collection in the series was made in 2004. She also has her own fragrance, "Cello by Annette".
        Her parents died within two years of each other. On September 2, 2007, Annette's mother, Virginia Funicello, died of pneumonia, a month after her 86th birthday. On May 21, 2009, Annette's father, Joe Funicello, died of natural causes at the age of 93. The only on-screen appearance her parents made was in the above-mentioned A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes: The Annette Funicello Story.
        On March 10, 2011, her Encino, California, home caught fire. She suffered smoke inhalation, but was otherwise unharmed.
      • Jillianne Jones
        Ron, I love what you have done with the song but it does make me feel very old. I was only 3 when this came out and can only vaguely remember it. Its great to
        Message 3 of 26 , Apr 24 7:49 PM
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          Ron,
           I love what you have done with the song but it does make me feel very old. I was only 3 when this came out and can only vaguely remember it.
           Its great to hear these old ones again so keep them coming.
          I am one of your greatest fans and carefully listen to everything you do.

          Jilli


        • Ron Tilden
          Thanks Jilli for the reply. What a coincidence, I just noticed your great version of Allegheny Moon was done by the same composers of O Dio Mio . Don t
          Message 4 of 26 , Apr 24 8:10 PM
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            Thanks Jilli for the reply.  What a coincidence, I just noticed your great version of "Allegheny Moon" was done by the same composers of "O Dio Mio".
            Don't feel so bad.... I was just starting out as a teenager back then.  I don't reply much to the group but do enjoy all the work that everyone in the group puts out (too many names to mention).  If I ever get a chance to retire I'll be able to do more midis but that could be a while.  
            Thanks again,
            Ron
               
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 10:49 PM
            Subject: [midkar] Re: O Dio Mio (Annette Funicello) seq Ron Tilden

             

            Ron,
             I love what you have done with the song but it does make me feel very old. I was only 3 when this came out and can only vaguely remember it.
             Its great to hear these old ones again so keep them coming.
            I am one of your greatest fans and carefully listen to everything you do.

            Jilli


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