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Highlights of tonight's chat

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  • Evan
    Howdy, MARCHers. We had our second monthly chat tonight. The transcript is in the Files section of our Yahoo group at
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 19, 2005
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      Howdy, MARCHers.

      We had our second monthly chat tonight. The transcript is in the Files
      section of our Yahoo group at
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/midatlanticretro/files/

      Here are the highlights.

      -- Open chat about random stuff -- including an HP Vectra still being used
      to monitor some very critical machines in the maternity ward of a hospital!
      -- Summarized what happened since last month -- we now have five officers
      (me - prez; andy - 1st vp; bill d. - 2nd vp; jim s. - treasurer; john a. -
      webmaster). We'll soon have a seat on InfoAge's board, which I guess I'll
      fill, unless someone really wants to do it. Jim is working on getting us a
      bank account and stuff, and he and I will meet with our InfoAge contact the
      night before the Aug. 13 event to discuss legalities of our museum plans.
      -- RE: Aug. 13 -- it's the official dedication day of InfoAge as a WWII
      historical site, and it's also a general open-house day for the various
      groups that will be tenants, such as ours. Five or six of us intend to be
      there, exhibiting some vintage computers, and possibly having static
      displays of the collection we're inheriting from InfoAge as well. It will
      be my job to talk with the media, etc., but everyone is welcome to attend
      (no exhibit necessary!) for hanging out and preaching our hobby to the
      public. There will also be tours of the InfoAge campus, time to check out
      some of the collection stuff that we'll be managing, and a chance to help
      Bill D. fix his IMSAI 8080 computer. (If you intend to participate that
      day, please tell us ASAP!)
      -- We talked about our still-under-construction web site. It's going, well,
      slowly. Soon, Bill d. will have the member inventory database working, so
      we can all keep track of our collections online and share the lists with
      others.
      -- We talked about our fall road trip, probably in September. We're
      undecided about whether to visit the Boston area or the DC area. Initial
      feedbacks are leaning toward DC -- Smithsonian, NSA Cyrptologic Museum,
      Historical Electronics Museum, and maybe a party at David G.'s house. :)
      Again, if you have any thoughts on Boston vs. DC, etc., then speak up!
      -- We'll be hosting VCF East 3.0 next spring, possibly at the end of March
      (appropriate!), and we decided to start planning that event after the fall
      road trip. That event will require a lot of hard work but it will be worth
      it!! (We brainstormed about the general design of our VCF edition. We'll
      probably have morning lecture tracks, a lunchtime keynote speaker -- anyone
      have ideas for who that should be? -- followed by afternoon / evening
      exhibits -- and then a dinner someplace. We also can borrow the game
      programming contest idea from past VCFs. -- more on that in a future email.
      VCF can double as an open-house for our museum, which will surely still be
      under construction at that time. There can also be InfoAge campus tours,
      etc. -- Another thing we'll need are a few volunteers to handle the attendee
      tickets, t-shirt sales, money, etc.). Another idea is to videotape the
      whole day for broadcasting on public cable tv.
      -- I remembered two additional museum topics. First, that our museum needs
      a name by Aug. 13, something like "MARCH Computer Museum @ InfoAge" but much
      catchier. Or maybe we can use that name, but refer to it as just MCMI --
      which almost means "1901" in roman numerals, kind of appropriate, since our
      computers are not Y2K-compliant! Second, we may have a special guest
      sometime in September, that being Bruce Damer who runs the very successful
      DigiBarn Computer Museum out in California (www.digibarn.com). Bruce would
      give us advice and feedback, etc., plus he's just a really nice guy who is
      extremely knowledgeable about computer history.

      - Evan Koblentz

      -----------------------------------------
      Evan Koblentz's personal homepage: http://www.snarc.net
      Also see: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/midatlanticretro/
      Where did PDAs come from? http://www.snarc.net/pda/pda-treatise.htm

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    • relayer
      I simply had to verify it for my own curiosity. MCMI isn t almost 1901. According to http://www.ivtech.com/roman it IS 1901 Now, to tie that into some totally
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 20, 2005
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        I simply had to verify it for my own curiosity. MCMI isn't almost
        1901. According to http://www.ivtech.com/roman it IS 1901

        Now, to tie that into some totally useless computer trivia. In 1901, a
        device with gears and wheels for calculating the motion of planets and
        stars called the Antikythera Mechanism (a computer of sorts) was
        discovered in a shipwreck off of a Greek island. It is believed to
        have been built in 80BC. Let's get THAT into our collection :)

        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Evan" <evan947@y...> wrote:
        > catchier. Or maybe we can use that name, but refer to it as just
        MCMI
        > which almost means "1901" in roman numerals, kind of appropriate,
        > since our computers are not Y2K-compliant! Second, we may have a
        > special guest
      • Evan
        Yup, there is a documentary they show sometimes on the Discovery Channel about that gadget. There are some very good articles scattered around the web too.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 20, 2005
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          Yup, there is a documentary they show sometimes on the Discovery Channel about that gadget.  There are some very good articles scattered around the web too.
           
          Now, I **REALLY** like calling our museum MCMI, but the Roman numeral web site also will accept MDCCCCI and other combinations as 1901.  LOL, is anyone here a math historian?  Which is the "proper" format?
           
          But we should use this, it's funny and an incredible coincidence.  Officially the name is MARCH Computer Museum @ InfoAge but I think the public will definitely appreciate our explanation of how it's also "1901" because they're old computers.  :)
           
          Woohoo!  We've got a museum name!


          From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of relayer
          Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2005 8:17 AM
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: Highlights of tonight's chat

          I simply had to verify it for my own curiosity. MCMI isn't almost
          1901. According to http://www.ivtech.com/roman it IS 1901

          Now, to tie that into some totally useless computer trivia. In 1901, a
          device with gears and wheels for calculating the motion of planets and
          stars called the Antikythera Mechanism (a computer of sorts) was
          discovered in a shipwreck off of a Greek island. It is believed to
          have been built in 80BC. Let's get THAT into our collection  :)

          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Evan" <evan947@y...> wrote:
          > catchier.  Or maybe we can use that name, but refer to it as
          just
          MCMI
          > which almost means "1901" in roman numerals, kind of
          appropriate,
          > since our computers are not Y2K-compliant!  Second,
          we may have a
          > special guest


        • Dan
          Evan, Not an official math historian, just a history buff. The format is MCMI for 1901, as also with 2001 = MMI and so on. The rule of thumb is use least
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 20, 2005
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            Evan,

            Not an official math historian, just a history buff.
            The format is MCMI for 1901, as also with 2001 = MMI and so on.
            The rule of thumb is use least amount of letters.
            When a digit is between 2-3 or 6-8 then tuse the extra I's, X', C's, etc in the additive mode
            Otherwise, use the subtractive mode, e.g. 4=VI, 40=XL, 900=CM

            I had a suggestion for the name,
            kinda long but somewhere in there is a acroname, how about,
            InfoAge Computer Museum of the Mid-Atlantic Region


            --Dan
             ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            [My Corner of Cyberspace                     http://ragooman.home.comcast.net/]
            [Pittsburgh Robotics Society                       http://www.pghrobotics.org/]
            [Pittsburgh Vintage Comp.Society http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pghvintagecomp/]
             ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


            Evan wrote:

             
            Now, I **REALLY** like calling our museum MCMI, but the Roman numeral web site also will accept MDCCCCI and other combinations as 1901.  LOL, is anyone here a math historian?  Which is the "proper" format?

          • John Allain
            Until a killer match for our MCMI s 1901 to another 1901 of real histotric value, maybe we shouldn t obsess about that number. I find no matches yet. 1201
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 21, 2005
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              Until a 'killer' match for our MCMI's 1901 to another 1901 of real
              histotric value, maybe we shouldn't obsess about that number.

              I find no matches yet. "1201" was the computer error code from
              Apollo 11, "601" the error code from "Andromeda Strain", "801"
              the project credited with the invention of RISC computing.... Nothing
              yet.

              Besides that would make for Three giant leaps of explanation.
              What's 1901? It's MCMI.
              So What's MCMI? It's MARCH Computer Museum...
              What's a MARCH?...

              John A.
            • Evan
              Well, the match is that 1901 implies computers that aren t Y2K-compliant, and thus OLD. LOL, anyway, I was thinking that we d use MCMI and the spelled-out
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 21, 2005
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                Well, the match is that 1901 implies computers that aren't Y2K-compliant, and thus OLD.
                 
                LOL, anyway, I was thinking that we'd use MCMI and the spelled-out version interchangeably, and tell the 1901 thing more as a joke whenever an interested party or reporter is near.  We can certainly explain that on our web site, too.


                From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Allain
                Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 11:12 AM
                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Highlights of tonight's chat

                Until a 'killer' match for our MCMI's 1901 to another 1901 of real
                histotric value, maybe we shouldn't obsess about that number.

                I find no matches yet.  "1201" was the computer error code from
                Apollo 11, "601" the error code from "Andromeda Strain", "801"
                the project credited with the invention of RISC computing....  Nothing
                yet.

                Besides that would make for Three giant leaps of explanation.
                   What's 1901?  It's MCMI.
                   So What's MCMI?  It's MARCH Computer Museum...
                   What's a MARCH?...

                John A.

              • billdeg@aol.com
                The Commodore 1901 monitor comes to mind as well. bd In a message dated 7/21/2005 12:15:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time, evan947@yahoo.com writes: Well, the match
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 21, 2005
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                  The Commodore 1901 monitor comes to mind as well.
                   
                  bd
                   
                  In a message dated 7/21/2005 12:15:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time, evan947@... writes:
                  Well, the match is that 1901 implies computers that aren't Y2K-compliant, and thus OLD.
                   
                  LOL, anyway, I was thinking that we'd use MCMI and the spelled-out version interchangeably, and tell the 1901 thing more as a joke whenever an interested party or reporter is near.  We can certainly explain that on our web site, too.
                   
                • Mike Loewen
                  ... Yeah, but that was a PAL monitor... :-) Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic.scol.pa.us Old Technology http://ripsaw.cac.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 21, 2005
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                    On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 billdeg@... wrote:

                    >
                    > The Commodore 1901 monitor comes to mind as well.

                    Yeah, but that was a PAL monitor... :-)


                    Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                    Old Technology http://ripsaw.cac.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                  • billdeg@aol.com
                    really - great I can try to get one then for my project. I found one on German Ebay. In a message dated 7/21/2005 1:59:18 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 21, 2005
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                      really - great I can try to get one then for my project. I found one on
                      German Ebay.

                      In a message dated 7/21/2005 1:59:18 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                      mloewen@... writes:

                      > On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 billdeg@... wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > > The Commodore 1901 monitor comes to mind as well.
                      >
                      > Yeah, but that was a PAL monitor... :-)
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