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Re: [midatlanticretro] Narrow Bandwidth Computer Terminal project

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  • Ray Sills
    HI Joe: The main issue is going to be synchronization. The mechanical TV system used spinning disks at the camera, and another at the receiver. Early
    Message 1 of 4 , May 26, 2008
      HI Joe:

      The main issue is going to be synchronization. The mechanical TV
      system used spinning disks at the camera, and another at the receiver.
      Early receivers had a knob to adjust the disk motor's speed. Once
      the receiver's disk was spinning at the same speed as the camera's, then
      you'd have a good "non-drifting" image.

      Today's TV and video monitor scan speeds are so much faster, that you
      would probably have to spin the disk at a very high rate, or use some
      sort of electronic system to make the mechanical disk spin at some
      whole number fraction of the scan rate.

      32 lines of resolution is a pretty crude video picture.

      73 de Ray


      On May 26, 2008, at 7:10 PM, Joe Giliberti wrote:

      > I've come up, at this point, with a (semi) realistic VCF plan. It
      > involves constructing an electromechanical video display, such as
      > those used in television research in the 1920's and 1930s, and
      > somehow, using it as a display terminal for a computer.
      >
      > As narrow bandwidth TV works, it uses an audio signal to flash a
      > light, which shines through the holes around the circumference of a
      > Nipkow disk. As the disk spins faster and faster, at around 750 RPM
      > for a 32 hole disk, the lines sync up, and you get a picture,
      > usually maginified by a lense, like one from a viewgraph projector.
      >
      > The trick is, I have no idea on how to convert, lets say, a
      > composite video output, to the light flashes of an LED behind the
      > disk. How would one go about doing this?
      >
      > Joe
      >
    • Mike Loewen
      A couple of months back, there was a thread about EPROM programmers suitable for classic systems. While the Willem programmer was one of the recommended
      Message 2 of 4 , May 28, 2008
        A couple of months back, there was a thread about EPROM programmers
        suitable for classic systems. While the Willem programmer was one of the
        recommended models, I wasn't too keen on the USB requirement. Another
        recommendation was the Data I/O 29B, a standalone unit which can be
        connected via RS-232 port to a system or terminal. I started keeping an
        eye on the Ebay offerings, and finally picked up one at a reasonable
        price:

        http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/DataIO/

        It came with the following adapters:

        Unipak 2B
        LogicPak
        303A-011 V01
        303A-011 CMOS/BiPolar
        910-1521 Calibration Extender
        351B-086

        If I'm reading things right, I have the right adapters to do 2764s and
        the like. I'm anxious to see if I can program a TurboROM or a KayPLUS ROM
        for my Kaypro 10. :-)


        Mike Loewen mloewen@...
        Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
      • Bob Applegate
        The 29 is a great programmer. Used them at many jobs in the 80s. I don t remember the adaptor model numbers, but the 29 could program just about anything
        Message 3 of 4 , May 28, 2008
          The 29 is a great programmer.  Used them at many jobs in the 80s.  I don't remember
          the adaptor model numbers, but the 29 could program just about anything with the
          right adaptor.  I was usually doing 2708s, 2716s, and 2732s.

          You got yourself a good piece of equipment.

          Speaking of which, it's time to head into the basement and burn a new EPROM for
          my S-100 machine...

          Bob


          On May 28, 2008, at 6:58 PM, Mike Loewen wrote:


          A couple of months back, there was a thread about EPROM programmers 
          suitable for classic systems. While the Willem programmer was one of the 
          recommended models, I wasn't too keen on the USB requirement. Another 
          recommendation was the Data I/O 29B, a standalone unit which can be 
          connected via RS-232 port to a system or terminal. I started keeping an 
          eye on the Ebay offerings, and finally picked up one at a reasonable 
          price:

          http://sturgeon. css.psu.edu/ ~mloewen/ DataIO/

          It came with the following adapters:

          Unipak 2B
          LogicPak
          303A-011 V01
          303A-011 CMOS/BiPolar
          910-1521 Calibration Extender
          351B-086

          If I'm reading things right, I have the right adapters to do 2764s and 
          the like. I'm anxious to see if I can program a TurboROM or a KayPLUS ROM 
          for my Kaypro 10. :-)

          Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic. scol.pa.us
          Old Technology http://sturgeon. css.psu.edu/ ~mloewen/ Oldtech/


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