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Tandy 102

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  • Brian Cirulnick
    Is anyone here intimately familiar with the inner workings of a Tandy Portable Computer, Model 102? I ve got a deader that needs some TLC. Power comes on, but
    Message 1 of 29 , Mar 23, 2008
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      Is anyone here intimately familiar with the inner workings of a Tandy
      Portable Computer, Model 102?

      I've got a deader that needs some TLC. Power comes on, but I get a
      garbled screen on the LCD. Under the expansion slot, I have one ram
      chip soldered in, the next is socketed, but the socket is empty, so I
      assume that's for RAM expansion. The ROM connector under there is, I
      assume, for an expansion ROM set.

      I've dis-assembled the machine, but can find no evidence of any
      physical damage (nothing obviously burnt), but I'm begining to assume
      that the machine has a bad ROM.

      Amazingly the on-board battery is still putting out 3.5 volts.

      Is this something that can easily be diagnosed, or is this a long
      project? I notice that there's a variable resistor in the circuitry
      that controls the input voltage from the wall-wart. Adjusting this
      allows the relay to engauge, which I'm assuming is the correct
      functionality, as I can hear the same relay click when I turn on my
      NEC 8201 (which does work well).

      TIA;
      Brian C.
    • Kelly Leavitt
      Put in fresh batteries and leave them in over night with the memory switch on. Then turn on the machine. Does this help? If not, I d then try replaceing the
      Message 2 of 29 , Mar 23, 2008
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        Put in fresh batteries and leave them in over night with the memory switch on. Then turn on the machine. Does this help?
         
        If not, I'd then try replaceing the internal battery. Rick at Club100.org sells them cheap enough, and I can install it if you bring it to me in Wantage.
         
        The internal battery may seem fresh, but unless used regularly it is suspect.
         
        Kelly
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Brian Cirulnick
        Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2008 10:22 PM
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] Tandy 102

        Is anyone here intimately familiar with the inner workings of a Tandy
        Portable Computer, Model 102?

        I've got a deader that needs some TLC. Power comes on, but I get a
        garbled screen on the LCD. Under the expansion slot, I have one ram
        chip soldered in, the next is socketed, but the socket is empty, so I
        assume that's for RAM expansion. The ROM connector under there is, I
        assume, for an expansion ROM set.

        I've dis-assembled the machine, but can find no evidence of any
        physical damage (nothing obviously burnt), but I'm begining to assume
        that the machine has a bad ROM.

        Amazingly the on-board battery is still putting out 3.5 volts.

        Is this something that can easily be diagnosed, or is this a long
        project? I notice that there's a variable resistor in the circuitry
        that controls the input voltage from the wall-wart. Adjusting this
        allows the relay to engauge, which I'm assuming is the correct
        functionality, as I can hear the same relay click when I turn on my
        NEC 8201 (which does work well).

        TIA;
        Brian C.


        No virus found in this outgoing message.
        Checked by AVG.
        Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.21.8/1339 - Release Date: 3/22/2008 4:43 PM

      • Christian Liendo
        Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite vintage computing or computer history book is?
        Message 3 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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          Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
          vintage computing or computer history book is?


          ____________________________________________________________________________________
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        • Bill Degnan
          I assigned the book Hackers to my students and selected readings from magazines. ... From: Christian Liendo Sent: Monday, March
          Message 4 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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            I assigned the book "Hackers" to my students and selected readings from magazines. 


            From: Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...>
            Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 11:33 AM
            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading


            Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
            vintage computing or computer history book is?


            ____________________________________________________________________________________
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          • Evan Koblentz
            If you want to read real history then I recommend starting with oral histories. The Charles Babbage Institute, IEEE, and Smithonian s Lemelson Center all
            Message 5 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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              If you want to read "real" history then I recommend starting with oral
              histories. The Charles Babbage Institute, IEEE, and Smithonian's Lemelson
              Center all have professionally done oral histories on their web sites.

              http://www.cbi.umn.edu/oh/index.phtml
              http://www.ieee.org/web/aboutus/history_center/oral_history/oh_a_fo.html
              http://invention.smithsonian.org/resources/default_index.aspx#computer

              Books-wise, I have so many favorites. No one book covers everything. Some
              examples of my favorites:
              - Apple Confidential (Owen Linzmayer)
              - Bootstrapping (Thierry Bardini)
              - The Chip (T.R. Reid)
              - Dealers of Lightning (Michael Hiltzik)
              - Hackers (Steven Levy)
              - ENIAC (Scott McCartney
              - Introduction to the Automatic Computer (Ned Chapin)
              - The Nudist on the Late Shift (Po Bronson)
              - Creating the Computer (Kenneth Flamm)

              Not a computer book, but very related and very good, is "When Information
              Came of Age" by Daniel Headrick.

              - Evan

              > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
              > vintage computing or computer history book is?
            • Christian Liendo
              I have Dealers of Lightning and was next after the one I am reading now. ____________________________________________________________________________________
              Message 6 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                I have Dealers of Lightning and was next after the one
                I am reading now.


                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                Be a better friend, newshound, and
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              • Mike Loewen
                ... The Soul of a New Machine , by Tracy Kidder - a look at Data General in the 70s and their struggles to design a machine to compete with the VAX. From
                Message 7 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                  > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                  > vintage computing or computer history book is?

                  "The Soul of a New Machine", by Tracy Kidder - a look at Data General
                  in the '70s and their struggles to design a machine to compete with the
                  VAX.

                  "From Whirlwind to Mitre: The R&D Story of the SAGE Air Defense
                  Computer", by Kent Redmond and Thomas Smith - a history of the design of
                  the SAGE system and its contributions to computing.


                  Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                  Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                • John Allain
                  ... Computer Lib/Dream Machines and Digital Deli as books that Became history over time. A Computer Perspective about earlier times, and, for its
                  Message 8 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                    > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                    > vintage computing or computer history book is?

                    "Computer Lib/Dream Machines" and "Digital Deli" as books that Became
                    history over time. "A Computer Perspective" about earlier times, and, for
                    its organization and pictures. The Time/Life series "Illustrated
                    Chronology" for its timeline. And a few hundred others.

                    John A.
                  • Dan Roganti
                    One of the many books that I enjoy is, Engines of the Mind by Joel N. Shurkin. It s not just simply a book that just recites facts and figures, it provides a
                    Message 9 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                      One of the many books that I enjoy is, Engines of the Mind by Joel N. Shurkin.
                      It's not just simply a book that just recites facts and figures, it provides a very descriptive insight by the many engineers that developed the various computers from the early beginnings.

                      =Dan

                      [ Pittsburgh --- http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/           ]
                      


                      Christian Liendo wrote:
                      Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                      vintage computing or computer history book is?
                      
                      
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                    • Evan Koblentz
                      Agreed, I forgot to mention that one. Related is Crystal Fire (about the invention of the transistor) by Michael Riordan and Fred Terman at Stanford (and
                      Message 10 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                        Agreed, I forgot to mention that one. Related is "Crystal Fire" (about
                        the invention of the transistor) by Michael Riordan and "Fred Terman at
                        Stanford" (and how his influence was key to starting Silicon Valley) by G.
                        Steward Gillmor.


                        > One of the many books that I enjoy is, Engines of the Mind by Joel N.
                        > Shurkin.
                        > It's not just simply a book that just recites facts and figures, it
                        > provides a very descriptive insight by the many engineers that developed
                        > the various computers from the early beginnings.
                        >
                        > =Dan
                      • Brian Cirulnick
                        ... Two books I enjoyed reading were: Computer: A History of the Information Machine ISBN: 0465029906 review: It s dry, but informative. Where Wizards Stay Up
                        Message 11 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Christian Liendo
                          <christian_liendo@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                          > vintage computing or computer history book is?
                          >
                          ---------------------

                          Two books I enjoyed reading were:

                          Computer: A History of the Information Machine
                          ISBN: 0465029906
                          review: It's dry, but informative.


                          Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet
                          ISBN: 0684832674
                          review: This book is about how BBN essentially created the internet.


                          Two oldies but goodies are Stuart Brand's book on MIT's Media Lab,
                          and Cringely's book, "Accidental Empires" -- this book in particular
                          irked me because of it's extreme west-coast-bias, but the book is
                          really written with panache because he understands that the entire
                          industry is about a few particular egos.

                          TTYL
                          Brian C.
                        • Ian King
                          I ve recently read a couple of good books not about the machines, but about the industry: Bill & Dave , the story of Hewlett-Packard, and DEC is Dead, Long
                          Message 12 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                            I've recently read a couple of good books not about the machines, but about the industry:  "Bill & Dave", the story of Hewlett-Packard, and 'DEC is Dead, Long Live DEC'.  I enjoy the former because it is the story of a company that was hugely successful sticking to a small, simple and clear set of principles (and began to decline once it abandoned them).  When I read some of the "mission statements" of today's companies, I try to remember that many of them may have been written by people for whom English was a language learned later in life.  :-) 
                             
                            I enjoy the latter book, despite the bittersweet story it tells, because it does a good job of bringing to life the glory days of the minicomputer era, and then dispassionately performs the autopsy on the moldering husk of a dead giant of technology that had crafted from its success the means of its own demise.  Fun stuff - sobering, perhaps even chilling if you work in this industry, but well written. 
                             
                            Both books point to the fact that, aside from all the wonderful toys we've made, in the end it's a human endeavor or it's nothing - and the strengths and foibles of those humans still do mean more than all the megaflops we can muster.  FWIW -- Ian


                            From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brian Cirulnick
                            Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 8:26 PM
                            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: Recommended Reading

                            --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, Christian Liendo
                            <christian_liendo@ ...> wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                            > vintage computing or
                            computer history book is?
                            >
                            ------------ ---------

                            Two books I enjoyed reading were:

                            Computer: A History of the Information Machine
                            ISBN: 0465029906
                            review: It's dry, but informative.

                            Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet
                            ISBN: 0684832674
                            review: This book is about how BBN essentially created the internet.

                            Two oldies but goodies are Stuart Brand's book on MIT's Media Lab,
                            and Cringely's book, "Accidental Empires" -- this book in particular
                            irked me because of it's extreme west-coast-bias, but the book is
                            really written with panache because he understands that the entire
                            industry is about a few particular egos.

                            TTYL
                            Brian C.

                          • Ian King
                            I ve loaned the Kidder book to people who aren t all that tech savvy, and they ve loved it - I ve had to buy three copies. :-) -- Ian (PS: I own an Eclipse
                            Message 13 of 29 , Mar 24, 2008
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                              I've loaned the Kidder book to people who aren't all that tech savvy, and they've loved it - I've had to buy three copies.  :-)  -- Ian
                               
                              (PS: I own an Eclipse MV-7800.) 


                              From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike Loewen
                              Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 11:51 AM
                              To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading


                              > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                              > vintage
                              computing or computer history book is?

                              "The Soul of a New Machine", by Tracy Kidder - a look at Data General
                              in the '70s and their struggles to design a machine to compete with the
                              VAX.

                              "From Whirlwind to Mitre: The R&D Story of the SAGE Air Defense
                              Computer", by Kent Redmond and Thomas Smith - a history of the design of
                              the SAGE system and its contributions to computing.

                              Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic. scol.pa.us
                              Old Technology http://sturgeon. css.psu.edu/ ~mloewen/ Oldtech/

                            • Greg N Shari (GMail)
                              Not exactly a history book but a great one dealing with security and dealing with hackers: The Cuckoo s Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer
                              Message 14 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                Not exactly a history book but a great one dealing with security and dealing with hackers: The Cuckoo's Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage by Cliff Stoll. 
                                 
                                Greg
                                 
                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Evan Koblentz
                                Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 12:01 PM
                                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                If you want to read "real" history then I recommend starting with oral
                                histories. The Charles Babbage Institute, IEEE, and Smithonian's Lemelson
                                Center all have professionally done oral histories on their web sites.

                                http://www.cbi. umn.edu/oh/ index.phtml
                                http://www.ieee. org/web/aboutus/ history_center/ oral_history/ oh_a_fo.html
                                http://invention. smithsonian. org/resources/ default_index. aspx#computer

                                Books-wise, I have so many favorites. No one book covers everything. Some
                                examples of my favorites:
                                - Apple Confidential (Owen Linzmayer)
                                - Bootstrapping (Thierry Bardini)
                                - The Chip (T.R. Reid)
                                - Dealers of Lightning (Michael Hiltzik)
                                - Hackers (Steven Levy)
                                - ENIAC (Scott McCartney
                                - Introduction to the Automatic Computer (Ned Chapin)
                                - The Nudist on the Late Shift (Po Bronson)
                                - Creating the Computer (Kenneth Flamm)

                                Not a computer book, but very related and very good, is "When Information
                                Came of Age" by Daniel Headrick.

                                - Evan

                                > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                > vintage computing or computer history book is?

                              • Evan
                                I enjoyed the Bill & Dave book, but found the DEC book rather boring. ... From: Ian King Subj: RE: [midatlanticretro] Re:
                                Message 15 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                  I enjoyed the Bill & Dave book, but found the DEC book rather boring.

                                  -----Original Message-----

                                  From: "Ian King" <iking@...>
                                  Subj: RE: [midatlanticretro] Re: Recommended Reading
                                  Date: Tue Mar 25, 2008 12:45 am
                                  Size: 5K
                                  To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>

                                  I've recently read a couple of good books not about the machines, but about the industry: "Bill & Dave", the story of Hewlett-Packard, and 'DEC is Dead, Long Live DEC'. I enjoy the former because it is the story of a company that was hugely successful sticking to a small, simple and clear set of principles (and began to decline once it abandoned them). When I read some of the "mission statements" of today's companies, I try to remember that many of them may have been written by people for whom English was a language learned later in life. :-)

                                  I enjoy the latter book, despite the bittersweet story it tells, because it does a good job of bringing to life the glory days of the minicomputer era, and then dispassionately performs the autopsy on the moldering husk of a dead giant of technology that had crafted from its success the means of its own demise. Fun stuff - sobering, perhaps even chilling if you work in this industry, but well written.

                                  Both books point to the fact that, aside from all the wonderful toys we've made, in the end it's a human endeavor or it's nothing - and the strengths and foibles of those humans still do mean more than all the megaflops we can muster. FWIW -- Ian

                                  From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brian Cirulnick
                                  Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 8:26 PM
                                  To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: Recommended Reading



                                  --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Christian Liendo
                                  <christian_liendo@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                  > vintage computing or computer history book is?
                                  >
                                  ---------------------

                                  Two books I enjoyed reading were:

                                  Computer: A History of the Information Machine
                                  ISBN: 0465029906
                                  review: It's dry, but informative.

                                  Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet
                                  ISBN: 0684832674
                                  review: This book is about how BBN essentially created the internet.

                                  Two oldies but goodies are Stuart Brand's book on MIT's Media Lab,
                                  and Cringely's book, "Accidental Empires" -- this book in particular
                                  irked me because of it's extreme west-coast-bias, but the book is
                                  really written with panache because he understands that the entire
                                  industry is about a few particular egos.

                                  TTYL
                                  Brian C.
                                • B. Degnan
                                  ... Evan knows his stuff and is a valuable resource to our group. May I add that magazines and periodicals are also sources of good information if you can get
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Evan Koblentz
                                    Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 12:01 PM
                                    To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                    If you want to read "real" history then I recommend starting with oral
                                    histories. The Charles Babbage Institute, IEEE, and Smithonian's Lemelson
                                    Center all have professionally done oral histories on their web sites.

                                    http://www.cbi.umn.edu/oh/index.phtml
                                    http://www.ieee.org/web/aboutus/history_center/oral_history/oh_a_fo.html
                                    http://invention.smithsonian.org/resources/default_index.aspx#computer

                                    Evan knows his stuff and is a valuable resource to our group. 

                                    May I add that magazines and periodicals are also sources of good information if you can get them.

                                    Some of the books mentioned in this thread are the history book equivalent to "greatest hits albums" and are a good starting point, but one should also read the authors' sources for a broader perspective.

                                    Bill
                                  • Evan Koblentz
                                    Something I forgot to mention about one of the books in my list below ( Introduction to the Automatic Computer ) is that it s very interesting because it was
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                      Something I forgot to mention about one of the books in my list below
                                      ("Introduction to the Automatic Computer") is that it's very interesting
                                      because it was first published in 1955. There were two follow-up editions;
                                      mine is the third edition (1963). Book has a very different angle than
                                      we're used to reading today!


                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: Evan Koblentz [mailto:evan@...]
                                      Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 12:01 PM
                                      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading


                                      If you want to read "real" history then I recommend starting with oral
                                      histories. The Charles Babbage Institute, IEEE, and Smithonian's Lemelson
                                      Center all have professionally done oral histories on their web sites.

                                      http://www.cbi.umn.edu/oh/index.phtml
                                      http://www.ieee.org/web/aboutus/history_center/oral_history/oh_a_fo.html
                                      http://invention.smithsonian.org/resources/default_index.aspx#computer

                                      Books-wise, I have so many favorites. No one book covers everything. Some
                                      examples of my favorites:
                                      - Apple Confidential (Owen Linzmayer)
                                      - Bootstrapping (Thierry Bardini)
                                      - The Chip (T.R. Reid)
                                      - Dealers of Lightning (Michael Hiltzik)
                                      - Hackers (Steven Levy)
                                      - ENIAC (Scott McCartney
                                      - Introduction to the Automatic Computer (Ned Chapin)
                                      - The Nudist on the Late Shift (Po Bronson)
                                      - Creating the Computer (Kenneth Flamm)

                                      Not a computer book, but very related and very good, is "When Information
                                      Came of Age" by Daniel Headrick.

                                      - Evan

                                      > Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                      > vintage computing or computer history book is?


                                      ------------------------------------

                                      Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    • John Allain
                                      ... Digital at Work: Snapshots from the First Thirty-five Years. is my choice for a DEC book. A pretty good balance of personal histories and facts. It was
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                        > I enjoyed the Bill & Dave book, but found the DEC book rather boring.

                                        "Digital at Work: Snapshots from the First Thirty-five Years."
                                        is my choice for a DEC book.
                                        A pretty good balance of personal histories and facts.
                                        It was published in 1992 so still got away looking a little too rosy...
                                        the Company still had 5y to live at that point

                                        ISBN 0-13-213489-6 if you can find it.

                                        John A.
                                      • Evan Koblentz
                                        ... Thanks, Bill. I try to be useful for something. :) To everyone: I have subscriber-only access to the online search function of the IEEE Annals of the
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                          Message
                                          >> Evan knows his stuff and is a valuable resource to our group.  

                                          Thanks, Bill.  I try to be useful for something.   :)
                                           
                                          To everyone: I have subscriber-only access to the online search function of the "IEEE Annals of the History of Computing" journal.  So if you need anything specific looked up, let me know...
                                        • Evan Koblentz
                                          Lookie here! Speaking of the Annals search that I mentioned in the previous email ... tonight I was searching for info about the MOBIDIC computer ... and
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                            Message
                                            Lookie here!  Speaking of the Annals search that I mentioned in the previous email ... tonight I was searching for info about the "MOBIDIC" computer ... and found this gem ("MOBIDIC and Fieldata" by Watts S. Humphrey, Annals, 1987, vol. 9, #2, page 140): "At the main Signal Corps R&D Laboratory at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, the computer activities were located at the satellite Evans Signal Laboratory about 10 miles away, where radar and other work not considered in the mainstream was performed."
                                             
                                            That makes me VERY FRIGGIN' HAPPY.
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: Evan Koblentz [mailto:evan@...]
                                            Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2008 11:19 PM
                                            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                            >> Evan knows his stuff and is a valuable resource to our group.  

                                            Thanks, Bill.  I try to be useful for something.   :)
                                             
                                            To everyone: I have subscriber-only access to the online search function of the "IEEE Annals of the History of Computing" journal.  So if you need anything specific looked up, let me know...
                                          • Bryan Pope
                                            ... Because you found your huge white whale? ;) Cheers,. Bryan
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                              Evan Koblentz wrote:
                                              > Lookie here! Speaking of the Annals search that I mentioned in the
                                              > previous email ... tonight I was searching for info about the
                                              > "MOBIDIC" computer ... and found this gem ("MOBIDIC and Fieldata" by
                                              > Watts S. Humphrey, Annals, 1987, vol. 9, #2, page 140): "At the main
                                              > Signal Corps R&D Laboratory at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, the computer
                                              > activities were located at the satellite Evans Signal Laboratory about
                                              > 10 miles away, where radar and other work not considered in the
                                              > mainstream was performed."
                                              >
                                              > That makes me VERY FRIGGIN' HAPPY.
                                              Because you found your huge white whale? ;)

                                              Cheers,.

                                              Bryan


                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > -----Original Message-----
                                              > *From:* Evan Koblentz [mailto:evan@...]
                                              > *Sent:* Tuesday, March 25, 2008 11:19 PM
                                              > *To:* midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                              > *Subject:* RE: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading
                                              >
                                              > >> Evan knows his stuff and is a valuable resource to our group.
                                              >
                                              > Thanks, Bill. I try to be useful for something. :)
                                              >
                                              > To everyone: I have subscriber-only access to the online search
                                              > function of the "IEEE Annals of the History of Computing"
                                              > journal. So if you need anything specific looked up, let me know...
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              >
                                              > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                              > Checked by AVG.
                                              > Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.22.0/1343 - Release Date: 3/25/2008 7:17 PM
                                              >
                                            • Evan Koblentz
                                              ... Because you found your huge white whale? ;) Good one! Actually the name MOBIDIC = Mobile Digital Computer (at least according to Wikipedia; I need to
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                                >
                                                > That makes me VERY FRIGGIN' HAPPY.
                                                Because you found your huge white whale? ;)

                                                Good one!

                                                Actually the name MOBIDIC = Mobile Digital Computer (at least according to
                                                Wikipedia; I need to verify that). But the definition of "Mobile" meant "it
                                                fits in a 30-foot trailer". So, the scope of the name was not lost on the
                                                designers, who had a good sense of humor.

                                                My next step is to check the sources for this article. It was only written
                                                in '87, so maybe the author is around. He lists 37 sources in the
                                                bibliography.

                                                That's the part of doing "real" history that I enjoy the most -- the hunt
                                                (not for the wumpus). Hunting is one of my biggest tasks by day, as a
                                                reporter. This is no different, except that instead of "news", it is
                                                "olds".
                                              • Andrew Molloy
                                                My favorites are Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer by Freiberger and Swaine; and Hackers. I also recommend Stan Veit s History of the
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Mar 25, 2008
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                                                  My favorites are Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer by Freiberger and Swaine; and Hackers. I also recommend Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer.

                                                  Andy

                                                  On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 11:03 AM, Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...> wrote:

                                                  Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                                  vintage computing or computer history book is?

                                                  __________________________________________________________
                                                  Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                  Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping


                                                • Christian Liendo
                                                  Your next step is to look on ebay if you can find a 40ft trailer with a huge computer for InfoAge. ...
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Mar 26, 2008
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                                                    Your next step is to look on ebay if you can find a
                                                    40ft trailer with a huge computer for InfoAge.


                                                    --- Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:


                                                    > Actually the name MOBIDIC = Mobile Digital Computer
                                                    > (at least according to
                                                    > Wikipedia; I need to verify that). But the
                                                    > definition of "Mobile" meant "it
                                                    > fits in a 30-foot trailer". So, the scope of the
                                                    > name was not lost on the
                                                    > designers, who had a good sense of humor.
                                                    >
                                                    > My next step is to check the sources for this
                                                    > article. It was only written
                                                    > in '87, so maybe the author is around. He lists 37
                                                    > sources in the
                                                    > bibliography.
                                                    >
                                                    > That's the part of doing "real" history that I enjoy
                                                    > the most -- the hunt
                                                    > (not for the wumpus). Hunting is one of my biggest
                                                    > tasks by day, as a
                                                    > reporter. This is no different, except that instead
                                                    > of "news", it is
                                                    > "olds".
                                                    >
                                                    >



                                                    ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                                    Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                    Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
                                                  • Evan Koblentz
                                                    Ha!! I think this will be strictly a poster exhibit.
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Mar 26, 2008
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                                                      Ha!! I think this will be strictly a poster exhibit.


                                                      > Your next step is to look on ebay if you can find a
                                                      > 40ft trailer with a huge computer for InfoAge.
                                                      >
                                                    • Jim Scheef
                                                      I agree with all three of Andy s picks, however the best history of general computing, bar none, is A History of Modern Computing, 2nd Edition , by Paul E.
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Mar 26, 2008
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                                                        I agree with all three of Andy's picks, however the best history of general computing, bar none, is "A History of Modern Computing, 2nd Edition", by Paul E. Ceruzzi, 2003, MIT Press. It is a scholarly, but readable, history of computers, the computer industry and key people. It is well researched and documented.

                                                        Jim

                                                        ----- Original Message ----
                                                        From: Andrew Molloy <awmolloy@...>
                                                        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 12:04:56 AM
                                                        Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                                        My favorites are Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer by Freiberger and Swaine; and Hackers. I also recommend Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer.

                                                        Andy

                                                        On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 11:03 AM, Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...> wrote:

                                                        Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                                        vintage computing or computer history book is?

                                                        __________________________________________________________
                                                        Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                        Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping



                                                      • schwepes@moog.netaxs.com
                                                        Remember, in the bad okld days, portable meant that it had a handle on it and it could be lifted with a crane on to a battleship. There were ads for a
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Mar 30, 2008
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                                                          Remember, in the bad okld days, portable meant that it had a handle on it
                                                          and it could be lifted with a crane on to a battleship.
                                                          There were ads for a "portable" computer that showed a pretty mini skirted
                                                          young thing carrying the case. Turns out that that was exactly what she
                                                          was carrying unless her other job was Olympic class weightlifter.'
                                                          bs


                                                          On Tue, 25 Mar 2008, Evan Koblentz wrote:

                                                          > >
                                                          > > That makes me VERY FRIGGIN' HAPPY.
                                                          > Because you found your huge white whale? ;)
                                                          >
                                                          > Good one!
                                                          >
                                                          > Actually the name MOBIDIC = Mobile Digital Computer (at least according to
                                                          > Wikipedia; I need to verify that). But the definition of "Mobile" meant "it
                                                          > fits in a 30-foot trailer". So, the scope of the name was not lost on the
                                                          > designers, who had a good sense of humor.
                                                          >
                                                          > My next step is to check the sources for this article. It was only written
                                                          > in '87, so maybe the author is around. He lists 37 sources in the
                                                          > bibliography.
                                                          >
                                                          > That's the part of doing "real" history that I enjoy the most -- the hunt
                                                          > (not for the wumpus). Hunting is one of my biggest tasks by day, as a
                                                          > reporter. This is no different, except that instead of "news", it is
                                                          > "olds".
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > ------------------------------------
                                                          >
                                                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                        • Andrew Molloy
                                                          Jim, I m going to have to look that one up. Thanks for the tip. Andy
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Mar 31, 2008
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                                                            Jim, I'm going to have to look that one up. Thanks for the tip.

                                                            Andy

                                                            On Thu, Mar 27, 2008 at 1:12 AM, Jim Scheef <jscheef@...> wrote:

                                                            I agree with all three of Andy's picks, however the best history of general computing, bar none, is "A History of Modern Computing, 2nd Edition", by Paul E. Ceruzzi, 2003, MIT Press. It is a scholarly, but readable, history of computers, the computer industry and key people. It is well researched and documented.

                                                            Jim

                                                            ----- Original Message ----
                                                            From: Andrew Molloy <awmolloy@...>
                                                            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                            Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 12:04:56 AM
                                                            Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                                            My favorites are Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer by Freiberger and Swaine; and Hackers. I also recommend Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer.

                                                            Andy

                                                            On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 11:03 AM, Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...> wrote:

                                                            Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                                            vintage computing or computer history book is?

                                                            __________________________________________________________
                                                            Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                            Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping




                                                          • Jim Scheef
                                                            Andy, I m sure you will like it. Jim ... From: Andrew Molloy To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 9:51:21
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Mar 31, 2008
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                                                              Andy,

                                                              I'm sure you will like it.

                                                              Jim

                                                              ----- Original Message ----
                                                              From: Andrew Molloy <awmolloy@...>
                                                              To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                              Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 9:51:21 PM
                                                              Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                                              Jim, I'm going to have to look that one up. Thanks for the tip.

                                                              Andy

                                                              On Thu, Mar 27, 2008 at 1:12 AM, Jim Scheef <jscheef@...> wrote:

                                                              I agree with all three of Andy's picks, however the best history of general computing, bar none, is "A History of Modern Computing, 2nd Edition", by Paul E. Ceruzzi, 2003, MIT Press. It is a scholarly, but readable, history of computers, the computer industry and key people. It is well researched and documented.

                                                              Jim

                                                              ----- Original Message ----
                                                              From: Andrew Molloy <awmolloy@...>
                                                              To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                              Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 12:04:56 AM
                                                              Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Recommended Reading

                                                              My favorites are Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer by Freiberger and Swaine; and Hackers. I also recommend Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer.

                                                              Andy

                                                              On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 11:03 AM, Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...> wrote:

                                                              Anyone have recommendations on what their favorite
                                                              vintage computing or computer history book is?

                                                              __________________________________________________________
                                                              Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                              Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping





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