Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: New member introduction

Expand Messages
  • sicaproductions
    ... that machine are on the list! :-) Bob, I loved that little machine. I wish I still had it and I keep hoping I ll trip over one at a flea market one day.
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 25, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Applegate" <bob@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hi Dave,
      > Watch what you say about Franklin 1000s... a few of us who designed
      that machine are on the list! :-)

      Bob,

      I loved that little machine. I wish I still had it and I keep hoping
      I'll trip over one at a flea market one day. AceWriter (Electric
      Pencil) was my introduction to word processing. I was awestruck that
      you could actually split a line of text open and insert new text then
      close it back up. I figured it couldn't get any better than that! And
      AceCalc was when I finally bit the bullet and forced myself to figure
      out what all the hoopla about spreadsheets was. I had a Hayes 300
      baud micromodem in that machine and with that and an outbound WATS
      line, I spent a lot of time on CBBS #1 when THAT was about as close
      to the Internet as we in the unwashed masses could get.

      Dang, I'm starting to feel about as ancient as that modem just
      remembering all this!!!

      --Dave
    • Ryan Harvey
      Welcome, Dave! Always good to have a new member. A 300 baud modem must ve been awful! I am currently set with an AT&T 6300 with a 1200 baud modem. Even that is
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 25, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Welcome, Dave! Always good to have a new member. A 300 baud modem must've been awful! I am currently set with an AT&T 6300 with a 1200 baud modem. Even that is pretty slow. It is alright, though. Maybe my 8MHz processor is slow...nah, that can't be it! I like the blocky looks of the Franklin but even more so the soft but rugged look of the Apple II line. Anyone out there ever think there were so many BBSes out there still active? I never did, but below find a link to a site with lists of presumably active BBSes and Telnet BBSes. I also have a long list of BBSes in the DF/W area, but I will have to transfer that off my AT&T's hard drive. I will reply to my post later when I get it. By the way, Bill, sorry to hear about your AT&T. I really hate it when sellers do that, too! That's like scraping some of the paint of a '57 Corvetter(I got the year right, right?) with it's keys!
         
        --Ryan
        [Yzzerdd]


        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
      • Mike Loewen
        ... My first (purchased) computer was a TRS-80 Model III, with 16KB RAM and a cassette recorder for storage. Later on, when I could afford it, I maxed out the
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 25, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          On Fri, 25 Jan 2008, Ryan Harvey wrote:

          > Welcome, Dave! Always good to have a new member. A 300 baud modem
          > must've been awful!

          My first (purchased) computer was a TRS-80 Model III, with 16KB RAM and
          a cassette recorder for storage. Later on, when I could afford it, I
          maxed out the memory at 48KB, bought a disk controller and a single-sided
          drive (went back the next day and got a second drive) and a RS-232 board.
          My first modem was a 300 baud Novation J-Cat:

          http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/Modems/Jcat.html

          The J-Cat isn't a "smart" modem, and doesn't even do tone dialing. I
          had to write a dialer program to pulse the hook switch relay to dial into
          the local BBSs. It was SLOW, but affordable. A Star Micronics Gemini 10
          printer completed the setup - I couldn't afford an Epson. :-)


          Mike Loewen mloewen@...
          Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
        • sicaproductions
          ... In a way, the slow modem just made for a different reality, but it was the only thing we knew. It didn t seem awful cause this was as good as it had
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 25, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Ryan Harvey
            <fieldhippieryan@...> wrote:
            >
            > A 300 baud modem must've been awful!

            In a way, the slow modem just made for a different reality, but it
            was the only thing we knew. It didn't seem "awful" 'cause this was as
            good as it had ever been and as fast as it had ever been. Before
            that, if we needed faster than the U.S. mail, we were Telexing things
            and having a secretary re-type it on a Selectric.

            At 300 baud, I can clearly recall being able to read the text as it
            scrolled past you on the green screen. You didn't have to save it to
            disk or print it out if you didn't want to, you could just read it as
            it came in! Since it was going by just about as fast as I could read
            it, I didn't see any advantage to a faster modem at the time :-)
            (seriously!) I did eventually upgrade to a "hot" new 1200 baud unit.

            We experimented with sending newsletter copy (ASCII) back and forth
            between offices, but that proved just unweildy enough that we could
            never get any of the people who would actually had to do it make it
            work, they just couldn't "get it." 8-1-N? 7-1-E? Heck, I hardly got
            it myself. It WAS difficult back then. And slow. But we didn't even
            try to send large files, so I guess we never noticed the slow speed.

            It was a few years later when I started sending video frame grabs
            (approx. 1MB) with a 2400 and enduring an excrutiating 10 minutes or
            more transfer time. About that time, I upgraded to a 33000 baud unit
            and things all was good again. Then the web came along...
          • Ryan Harvey
            I never did have to endure dial-up. All my life I have been spoiled with high-speed ethernet and wireless. I am back on the cord, though. I finally convinced
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 25, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              I never did have to endure dial-up. All my life I have been spoiled with high-speed ethernet and wireless. I am back on the cord, though. I finally convinced my folks to let me run it. So I have a cord going from the router, along the ceiling, and into a wired router in my room.
              Back on topic!
              1200 baud isn't too bad. Seems I never have used faster and only in the last few days have used dial-up BBSing I didn't know how fast it should be. I didn't know if I should get the fast scrolling text or it all in one blast. The text scrolling at 1200 baud is pretty good. It can load an entire large paragraph in just a few seconds, faster than I can read. The ASCII graphics take longer, about 2x or more longer for an entire screen of them, but during that time I tend to get tea or stir whatever I am cooking, or just something that only takes about a minute. I use a color monitor for my computer, but a green screen wouldn't be so bad. I don't use one because I leave my PC on all day. With color I can turn the screen off. On my IBM I can do essentially the same thing. But on my AT&T, there is no power to turn off. I would have to totally unplug the screen to avoid burn-in. Back in the day to keep your battery charged(if you had one) you just used your computer. Of course, back then PCs were used about as much as today and you scrolled through alot of text so you had no burn-in worries. On the subject, how long does it take for burn-in to occur, and can a color monitor experience burn? I have never had any burns because I am always catious about leaving one thing on my screen, and thus have no clue about the timing for that. It I can find a faster 8-bit modem(I may have one) I will likely up the ante on my AT&T PC 6300. 2400 baud would be enough.
               
              --Ryan


              Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
            • fieldfan1
              ... with high-speed ethernet and wireless. I am back on the cord, though. I finally convinced my folks to let me run it. So I have a cord going from the
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 26, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Ryan Harvey
                <fieldhippieryan@...> wrote:
                >
                > I never did have to endure dial-up. All my life I have been spoiled
                with high-speed ethernet and wireless. I am back on the cord, though.
                I finally convinced my folks to let me run it. So I have a cord going
                from the router, along the ceiling, and into a wired router in my room.
                > Back on topic!
                > 1200 baud isn't too bad. Seems I never have used faster and only
                in the last few days have used dial-up BBSing I didn't know how fast
                it should be. I didn't know if I should get the fast scrolling text or
                it all in one blast. The text scrolling at 1200 baud is pretty good.
                It can load an entire large paragraph in just a few seconds, faster
                than I can read. The ASCII graphics take longer, about 2x or more
                longer for an entire screen of them, but during that time I tend to
                get tea or stir whatever I am cooking, or just something that only
                takes about a minute. I use a color monitor for my computer, but a
                green screen wouldn't be so bad. I don't use one because I leave my PC
                on all day. With color I can turn the screen off. On my IBM I can do
                essentially the same thing. But on my AT&T, there is no power to turn
                off. I would have to totally unplug the screen to avoid burn-in. Back
                in the day to keep your battery charged(if you had one) you just used
                your computer. Of course,
                > back then PCs were used about as much as today and you scrolled
                through alot of text so you had no burn-in worries. On the subject,
                how long does it take for burn-in to occur, and can a color monitor
                experience burn? I have never had any burns because I am always
                catious about leaving one thing on my screen, and thus have no clue
                about the timing for that. It I can find a faster 8-bit modem(I may
                have one) I will likely up the ante on my AT&T PC 6300. 2400 baud
                would be enough.
                >
                > --Ryan
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile.
                Try it now.
                >
                My first computer was a Commodore Vic 20 with a 300 baud VIC modem,
                but I did most of my early telecom on an Atari 800XL with first a 300
                baud and then a 2400 baud modem. 2400 was amazingly fast to me back then.
              • Ian King
                One of my first industry jobs was writing a system to run a check imprinter. During the introduction of the system to the company who had purchased it, we (I)
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 26, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  One of my first industry jobs was writing a system to run a check imprinter.  During the introduction of the system to the company who had purchased it, we (I) had a connection into their site to do maintenance or troubleshoot issues.  It was over a phone line with - you guessed it - a 300 baud modem.  It was painfully slow, but less burdensome than traveling an hour to the customer site each time....  At least I think it was! 
                   
                  That was also my first experience of technology displacing jobs: the system I'd written replaced twelve people with Friden Flexiwriters, with three people on ADM-3 terminals.  It also improved the efficiency of the business because reorders could be done by pulling up a record out of a database.  Needless to say, on the site visit we did conduct, the managers loved us and the employees looked on us as the spawn of Satan.  Ah, progress.... 
                   
                  It was run on a Nova 1200 clone produced by EDS, FYI.  I wrote it in a BASIC dialect that included native database semantics. -- Ian


                  From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ryan Harvey
                  Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 3:52 PM
                  To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: New member introduction

                  Welcome, Dave! Always good to have a new member. A 300 baud modem must've been awful! I am currently set with an AT&T 6300 with a 1200 baud modem. Even that is pretty slow. It is alright, though. Maybe my 8MHz processor is slow...nah, that can't be it! I like the blocky looks of the Franklin but even more so the soft but rugged look of the Apple II line. Anyone out there ever think there were so many BBSes out there still active? I never did, but below find a link to a site with lists of presumably active BBSes and Telnet BBSes. I also have a long list of BBSes in the DF/W area, but I will have to transfer that off my AT&T's hard drive. I will reply to my post later when I get it. By the way, Bill, sorry to hear about your AT&T. I really hate it when sellers do that, too! That's like scraping some of the paint of a '57 Corvetter(I got the year right, right?) with it's keys!
                   
                  --Ryan
                  [Yzzerdd]


                  Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

                • Ryan Harvey
                  Well, I got the list off my AT&T. Did it last night, actually, just remembered I was going to post it here as well. Many of the numbers are invalid, that I
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 26, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Well, I got the list off my AT&T. Did it last night, actually, just remembered I was going to post it here as well. Many of the numbers are invalid, that I tried. Two I dialed were real numbers, one of which to a spanish place around here. I dunno if everyone can get attached files on a mailing list, if not, it won't be hard for me to copy and paste it all into an e-mail. Don't hesitate to ask me to if attaching a file to a group message doesn't work.
                     
                    --Ryan


                    Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                  • Sridhar Ayengar
                    ... I remember upgrading from 110 to 300. It felt sooooo much faster! Peace... Sridhar
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 6, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      sicaproductions wrote:
                      >> A 300 baud modem must've been awful!
                      >
                      > In a way, the slow modem just made for a different reality, but it
                      > was the only thing we knew. It didn't seem "awful" 'cause this was as
                      > good as it had ever been and as fast as it had ever been. Before
                      > that, if we needed faster than the U.S. mail, we were Telexing things
                      > and having a secretary re-type it on a Selectric.
                      >
                      > At 300 baud, I can clearly recall being able to read the text as it
                      > scrolled past you on the green screen. You didn't have to save it to
                      > disk or print it out if you didn't want to, you could just read it as
                      > it came in! Since it was going by just about as fast as I could read
                      > it, I didn't see any advantage to a faster modem at the time :-)
                      > (seriously!) I did eventually upgrade to a "hot" new 1200 baud unit.

                      I remember upgrading from 110 to 300. It felt sooooo much faster!

                      Peace... Sridhar
                    • Kelly Leavitt
                      Sridhar: Congrats!! You don t look old enough to remember upgrading from 110 to 300. Either you started real young or aged real well. I m 41, started with
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 6, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Sridhar:
                        Congrats!! You don't look old enough to remember upgrading from 110 to 300. Either you started real young or aged real well.

                        I'm 41, started with computers in 1981, and I think my first modem was 300 baud even then. But the upgrade to 1200. WOW! Does anyone else remember RLE graphics on Genie (or was it Compuserver)?

                        I still remember my last Genie (XTH43602) and compuserve (70145,1013) accounts.

                        Kelly


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Sridhar Ayengar
                        Sent: Wed 2/6/2008 12:02 PM
                        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                        Cc:
                        Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Slow modems



                        sicaproductions wrote:
                        >> A 300 baud modem must've been awful!
                        >
                        > In a way, the slow modem just made for a different reality, but it
                        > was the only thing we knew. It didn't seem "awful" 'cause this was as
                        > good as it had ever been and as fast as it had ever been. Before
                        > that, if we needed faster than the U.S. mail, we were Telexing things
                        > and having a secretary re-type it on a Selectric.
                        >
                        > At 300 baud, I can clearly recall being able to read the text as it
                        > scrolled past you on the green screen. You didn't have to save it to
                        > disk or print it out if you didn't want to, you could just read it as
                        > it came in! Since it was going by just about as fast as I could read
                        > it, I didn't see any advantage to a faster modem at the time :-)
                        > (seriously!) I did eventually upgrade to a "hot" new 1200 baud unit.

                        I remember upgrading from 110 to 300. It felt sooooo much faster!

                        Peace... Sridhar
                      • Mason Taube
                        It was Compuserve. They later brought us GIF89 once color widely used. ... From: Kelly Leavitt To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                        Message 11 of 14 , Feb 6, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          It was Compuserve. They later brought us GIF89 once color widely used.

                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Kelly Leavitt <kelly@...>
                          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2008 12:08:22 PM
                          Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Re: Slow modems

                          Sridhar:
                          Congrats!! You don't look old enough to remember upgrading from 110 to 300. Either you started real young or aged real well.

                          I'm 41, started with computers in 1981, and I think my first modem was 300 baud even then. But the upgrade to 1200. WOW! Does anyone else remember RLE graphics on Genie (or was it Compuserver) ?

                          I still remember my last Genie (XTH43602) and compuserve (70145,1013) accounts.

                          Kelly


                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com on behalf of Sridhar Ayengar
                          Sent: Wed 2/6/2008 12:02 PM
                          To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                          Cc:
                          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Slow modems



                          sicaproductions wrote:

                          >> A 300 baud modem must've been awful!
                          >
                          > In a way, the slow modem just made for a different reality, but it
                          > was the only thing we knew. It didn't seem "awful" 'cause this was as
                          > good as it had ever been and as fast as it had ever been. Before
                          > that, if we needed faster than the U.S. mail, we were Telexing things
                          > and having a secretary re-type it on a Selectric.
                          >
                          > At 300 baud, I can clearly recall being able to read the text as it
                          > scrolled past you on the green screen. You didn't have to save it to
                          > disk or print it out if you didn't want to, you could just read it as
                          > it came in! Since it was going by just about as fast as I could read
                          > it, I didn't see any advantage to a faster modem at the time :-)
                          > (seriously!) I did eventually upgrade to a "hot" new 1200 baud unit.

                          I remember upgrading from 110 to 300. It felt sooooo much faster!

                          Peace... Sridhar







                          Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.