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A new MARCH idea...

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  • Evan Koblentz
    After reorganizing all of my books recently, tonight I brought a bunch of other books that I don t want down to the InfoAge. The last time I checked on the
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 26, 2007
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      After reorganizing all of my books recently, tonight I brought a bunch of other books that I don't want down to the InfoAge.  The last time I checked on the status of their library (a few months ago), there were several shelves of generic computer books, so I figured Fred would be glad to have them.  I was wrong.  They want the main InfoAge library (which is one or two rooms on the second floor of the hotel) to focus on "radio, radar, and wireless" which leaves generic computer books on the outside looking in.  So, Fred and I made a deal.  MARCH will have its own library in a different room.  What we'll do is maintain a collection of any computer books / magazines / documents that we deem historically worthy -- AND -- we will operate an ultra-cut-rate computer bookstore.  We'll split the proceeds 50/50 with InfoAge.  What I envision is that the store will be part of our museum area, and it'll only be open when we are there.  We'll make the prices dirt-cheap, i.e., bins for $1, $5, and maybe $10 for better/newer books.  The organization of these books will also be very simple, i.e., how-to in one bin, programming in another, everything else in a third.  Just like with the computer collection, we can keep any duplicate books in some other place, such as the basement (we still have a LOT of space there).  Some people (I can guess who!) may criticize this next part, but, I don't even see that we'll have to keep any list of the inventory.  Just put the books into the appropriate bin as they arrive, and collect the cash as they get sold.  Fred said he trusts us to be the most qualified people at InfoAge to decide which ones to keep for the library and which ones to sell (or even to dispose of or mark "free" if necessary).
       
      This accomplishes three things: 1., the main InfoAge library gets to reclaim precious shelf space; 2., MARCH officially gets to have its own InfoAge-sanctioned library; 3., InfoAge and MARCH each make a few dollars for not-too-much effort.  (Of course, we can trust Fred, Steve, etc. to let museum visitors browse our for-sale bins and to collect money when we're not there in person.)
       
      One more thought: anyone who is a PAID member of our little user group here will get a 50% discount on anything in the bins.
       
      In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous" .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole computer!  (But unless we decide otherwise, ALL items for sale will still have the profits go to MARCH and InfoAge ... it is WAY too complicated, paperwork-wise, to start a consignment shop.)  The beautiful part about this plan is that there's NO paperwork, whether of the traditional or digital kind, to keep track of other than how much money we make.
       
      I'm stoked.
       
      What do ya'll think?
    • Dan Roganti
      Evan, Sounds like a good idea. I was just wondering if there might be some way for members like me who live kinda far to participate in this too--maybe offer
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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        Evan,

        Sounds like a good idea.

        I was just wondering if there might be some way for members like me who live kinda far to participate in this too--maybe offer mail order too ?
        I realize it might get cumbersome to organize this also but it would be nice to have.

        BTW, I'll have a few books to offer when I make my trip in the spring.

        =Dan

        Evan Koblentz wrote:
        Message
        After reorganizing all of my books recently, tonight I brought a bunch of other books that I don't want down to the InfoAge.  The last time I checked on the status of their library (a few months ago), there were several shelves of generic computer books, so I figured Fred would be glad to have them.  I was wrong.  They want the main InfoAge library (which is one or two rooms on the second floor of the hotel) to focus on "radio, radar, and wireless" which leaves generic computer books on the outside looking in.  So, Fred and I made a deal.  MARCH will have its own library in a different room.  What we'll do is maintain a collection of any computer books / magazines / documents that we deem historically worthy -- AND -- we will operate an ultra-cut-rate computer bookstore.  We'll split the proceeds 50/50 with InfoAge.  What I envision is that the store will be part of our museum area, and it'll only be open when we are there.  We'll make the prices dirt-cheap, i.e., bins for $1, $5, and maybe $10 for better/newer books.  The organization of these books will also be very simple, i.e., how-to in one bin, programming in another, everything else in a third.  Just like with the computer collection, we can keep any duplicate books in some other place, such as the basement (we still have a LOT of space there).  Some people (I can guess who!) may criticize this next part, but, I don't even see that we'll have to keep any list of the inventory.  Just put the books into the appropriate bin as they arrive, and collect the cash as they get sold.  Fred said he trusts us to be the most qualified people at InfoAge to decide which ones to keep for the library and which ones to sell (or even to dispose of or mark "free" if necessary).
         
        This accomplishes three things: 1., the main InfoAge library gets to reclaim precious shelf space; 2., MARCH officially gets to have its own InfoAge-sanctioned library; 3., InfoAge and MARCH each make a few dollars for not-too-much effort.  (Of course, we can trust Fred, Steve, etc. to let museum visitors browse our for-sale bins and to collect money when we're not there in person.)
         
        One more thought: anyone who is a PAID member of our little user group here will get a 50% discount on anything in the bins.
         
        In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous" .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole computer!  (But unless we decide otherwise, ALL items for sale will still have the profits go to MARCH and InfoAge ... it is WAY too complicated, paperwork-wise, to start a consignment shop.)  The beautiful part about this plan is that there's NO paperwork, whether of the traditional or digital kind, to keep track of other than how much money we make.
         
        I'm stoked.
         
        What do ya'll think?

        No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Free Edition. Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.17.9/1198 - Release Date: 12/26/2007 5:26 PM
      • B. Degnan
        ... sounds fine. There s nothing stopping anyone from putting together a system that records what was sold if they re so inclined, but they have to donate the
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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          <snip>



           
          In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous" .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole computer!  (But unless we decide otherwise, ALL items for sale will still have the profits go to MARCH and InfoAge ... it is WAY too complicated, paperwork-wise, to start a consignment shop.)  The beautiful part about this plan is that there's NO paperwork, whether of the traditional or digital kind, to keep track of other than how much money we make.
           
          I'm stoked.
           
          What do ya'll think?


          sounds fine. 

          There's nothing stopping anyone from putting together a system that records what was sold if they're so inclined, but they have to donate the computer system too, and we should have it on-site.  I still like Jim's idea of setting up a vintage terminal / server at InfoAge to serve as our bookkeeping and guestbook system, mostly just for fun and tinkering.

          Bill
        • Evan
          Sorry, but no. That would break the simplicity. We d have to maintain a book list and deal with shipping. It would also de-incentivize people in your
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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            Sorry, but no. That would break the simplicity. We'd have to maintain a book list and deal with shipping. It would also de-incentivize people in your geographic situation to come out here. :)

            -----Original Message-----

            From: Dan Roganti <ragooman@...>
            Subj: Re: [midatlanticretro] A new MARCH idea...
            Date: Thu Dec 27, 2007 7:44 am
            Size: 6K
            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com

            Evan,

            Sounds like a good idea.

            I was just wondering if there might be some way for members like me who live kinda far to participate in this too--maybe offer mail order too ?
            I realize it might get cumbersome to organize this also but it would be nice to have.

            BTW, I'll have a few books to offer when I make my trip in the spring.

            =Dan

            Evan Koblentz wrote: Message
            After reorganizing all of my books recently, tonight I brought a bunch of other books that I don't want down to the InfoAge. The last time I checked on the status of their library (a few months ago), there were several shelves of generic computer books, so I figured Fred would be glad to have them. I was wrong. They want the main InfoAge library (which is one or two rooms on the second floor of the hotel) to focus on "radio, radar, and wireless" which leaves generic computer books on the outside looking in. So, Fred and I made a deal. MARCH will have its own library in a different room. What we'll do is maintain a collection of any computer books / magazines / documentsthat we deem historically worthy -- AND -- we will operate an ultra-cut-rate computer bookstore. We'll split the proceeds 50/50 with InfoAge. What I envision is that the store will be part of our museum area, and it'll only be open when we are there. We'll make the prices dirt-cheap, i.e., bins for $1, $5, and maybe
            $10 for better/newer books. The organization of these books will also be very simple, i.e., how-to in one bin, programming in another, everything else in a third. Just like with the computer collection, we can keep any duplicate books in some other place, such as the basement (we still have a LOT of space there). Some people (I can guess who!) may criticize this next part, but, I don't even see that we'll have to keep any list of the inventory. Just put the books into the appropriate bin as they arrive, and collect the cash as they get sold. Fred said he trusts us to be the most qualified people at InfoAge to decide which ones to keep for the library and which ones to sell (or even to dispose of or mark "free" if necessary).

            This accomplishes three things: 1., the main InfoAge library gets to reclaim precious shelf space; 2., MARCH officially gets to have its own InfoAge-sanctioned library; 3., InfoAge and MARCH each make a few dollars for not-too-much effort. (Of course, we can trust Fred, Steve, etc. to let museum visitors browse our for-sale bins and to collect money when we're not there in person.)

            One more thought: anyone who is a PAID member of our little user group here will get a 50% discount on anything in the bins.

            In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous" .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole computer! (But unless we decide otherwise, ALL items for sale will still have the profits go to MARCH and InfoAge ... it is WAY too complicated, paperwork-wise, to start a consignment shop.) The beautiful part about this plan is that there's NO paperwork, whether of the traditional or digital kind, to keep track of other than how much money we make.

            I'm stoked.

            What do ya'll think?
            No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Free Edition. Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.17.9/1198 - Release Date: 12/26/2007 5:26 PM
          • Evan
            Guestbook, yes. Inventory, no -- only because I don t want to get stuck as the guy who has to update it all the time. Ya know? ... From: B. Degnan
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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              Guestbook, yes. Inventory, no -- only because I don't want to get stuck as the guy who has to update it all the time. Ya know?

              -----Original Message-----

              From: "B. Degnan" <billdeg@...>
              Subj: Re: [midatlanticretro] A new MARCH idea...
              Date: Thu Dec 27, 2007 8:03 am
              Size: 2K
              To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com

              <snip>



              In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous" .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole computer! (But unless we decide otherwise, ALL items for sale will still have the profits go to MARCH and InfoAge ... it is WAY too complicated, paperwork-wise, to start a consignment shop.) The beautiful part about this plan is that there's NO paperwork, whether of the traditional or digital kind, to keep track of other than how much money we make.

              I'm stoked.

              What do ya'll think?

              sounds fine.

              There's nothing stopping anyone from putting together a system that records what was sold if they're so inclined, but they have to donate the computer system too, and we should have it on-site. I still like Jim's idea of setting up a vintage terminal / server at InfoAge to serve as our bookkeeping and guestbook system, mostly just for fun and tinkering.

              Bill
            • B. Degnan
              ... Does not matter to me. Does anyone have specific plans to set up a working system (timesharing/terminal) with what we have on site. I know that there was
              Message 6 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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                At 08:09 AM 12/27/2007 -0500, you wrote:
                >Guestbook, yes. Inventory, no -- only because I don't want to get stuck
                >as the guy who has to update it all the time. Ya know?


                Does not matter to me. Does anyone have specific plans to set up a working
                system (timesharing/terminal) with what we have on site. I know that there
                was talk.

                Bill
              • Herb Johnson
                ... stuck ... working ... that there ... I have some notions about how other clubs, and public libraries, do book sales. Just my opinions and experiences. I
                Message 7 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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                  > evan wrote:
                  > >Guestbook, yes. Inventory, no -- only because I don't want to get
                  stuck
                  > >as the guy who has to update it all the time. Ya know?
                  >
                  "B. Degnan" <billdeg@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Does not matter to me. Does anyone have specific plans to set up a
                  working
                  > system (timesharing/terminal) with what we have on site. I know
                  that there
                  > was talk.
                  >
                  > Bill
                  >

                  I have some notions about how other clubs, and public libraries, do
                  book sales. Just my opinions and experiences. I won't post details,
                  they are boring and arbitrary and really up to whoever takes charge.
                  If anyone asks me privately, I can tell them more, but others know
                  more about this stuff than I and my sources are obvious in context.

                  Fundamental principle: any systems we come up with, for library or
                  book sales, must be self-evident, require no training or explanation,
                  just do what the last person did. Maybe a few lines of "do this" at
                  best. I've taken hints from local organizations' book sales, I've seen
                  plenty of them.

                  For book sale recording, we can use a simple two-part paper reciept
                  book. It self-copies a reciept; we keep a copy and give the original
                  to the buyer. A lockbox with some cash to make change and to hold
                  checks and payments. Include a simple ledger sheet in the box for "I
                  opened the box this date, found $$$ dollars; I closed the box this
                  date, it had $$$ dollars". Dirt simple, just follow what the last
                  person did, just keep a trail on paper. I've seen this system, used it
                  myself. Entirely adequate for our little corporation. Costs $4 per 50
                  reciepts, plus a small book for the lockbox.

                  The alternatives: Evan puts $20 a month into the lockbox to
                  cover losses and to make change. Someone sells all our books for $1
                  each. Or something like that: so why not keep track, follow other's
                  examples?

                  How to organize the books on sale? Shelve books by title,
                  alphabetically and use a list to find a book, or just browse. This is
                  not the Library of Congress. Pricing information? Someone determines a
                  price, and puts a **colored adhesive dot** on the inside cover of the
                  book. The volunteer selling, only needs to have a list and know what
                  the colors mean; and that reciept book. "Bins" to sort books will
                  become piles of unsorted books, pretty fast.

                  About that book list...I *strongly recommnend* a list of books for
                  sale. The alledged pain of making a list is greatly exaggerated. It is
                  merely tedious. I did it for the 11/20 boxes of books, so I know.

                  List title, author, year published, ISBN number if any. The Web will
                  find all the rest of the information, if anyone cares to look. Put it
                  in a paper ledger book, kept at the book shelves. When we get more
                  than 200 books, then we can use another method.

                  If anyone wants a copy of the list, they can come by and make a
                  photocopy. If you want it online, make a photocopy and put it online
                  yourself, enjoy. Anyone on duty at InfoAge can read the ledger, no
                  training needed, no typing skills. Oh, and no "inventory" - what is on
                  the bookshelf IS the inventory, the list is never current or complete,
                  someone might make a new ledger from time to time, some boring day at
                  InfoAge.

                  Library? Some variation of these schemes will work for a library.

                  Libraries also have lending policies (no lending is a policy too).
                  Policy is up to the MARCH Board, that's their job, full stop. Books if
                  lent there must have some paperwork (who borrowed what, when) which
                  is similar to the reciept scheme I mentioned. Book lists, are book
                  lists. Only people well over 40 will recall paper card catalogs and
                  paper card "books out/in" schemes at public libraries; those work
                  reasonably well for small libraries today.

                  Those who insist our computer club book library "must" be
                  computerized, should keep in mind that automobile clubs do not use
                  automobiles to travel from room to room in their museums. When we have
                  200 books to lend, and a bunch of people bugging us about them, THEN
                  someone can set up a better scheme.

                  What's the best way to do all this? Remember the golden rule: "he who
                  has the gold, makes the rules". Whoever takes charge, will likely
                  decide. I hope they keep track and give us some clues; I've offered
                  some suggestions accordingly, so the fun of all these books can be
                  shared.

                  Herb Johnson
                  paper computerist

                  Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
                  http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/ web site
                  http://www.retrotechnology.net/herbs_stuff/ domain mirror
                  my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
                  if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
                  "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
                  S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"
                • Evan Koblentz
                  I agree with most of what you said. You re probably right about bins quickly becoming unsorted, but that applies to shelves, too. We probably will have to use
                  Message 8 of 16 , Dec 27, 2007
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                    I agree with most of what you said.

                    You're probably right about bins quickly becoming unsorted, but that applies
                    to shelves, too. We probably will have to use traditional shelves just
                    because they can hold more books per square foot than horizontal bins. This
                    is an issue because we're going to START with far more than 200 books, maybe
                    more than 1,000 (okay, probably not 1,000, but there are at least a few
                    hundred already in InfoAge's possession. Rather than sort them strictly by
                    category and then alphabetically inside each category, I think the easiest
                    method is to sort them only * generally * by category, and leave it at that.
                    I agree with you about using simple colored dots to indicate the prices and
                    a simple lockbox-and-paper method of tracking the sales. (Back in 2000, at
                    eWeek, I interviewed Scott Cook who founded Intuit. Of his company's new
                    hosted accounting software, he explained, "It's for people who think General
                    Ledger was a World War II hero.")

                    Anyway, it sounds like most people agree with what Fred and I think, which
                    is that book sales are an easy(-ish) way to make a few dollars for InfoAge
                    and MARCH, clear some valuable space, and provide a community service.
                  • John Allain
                    ... I think this idea got rejected, if I read the flow correctly, I ll just say that the idea of trading things (things = things, books) amongst ourselves
                    Message 9 of 16 , Dec 28, 2007
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                      > In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous"
                      > .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole
                      > computer!

                      I think this idea got rejected, if I read the flow correctly, I'll just say
                      that the idea of trading things (things = things, books) amongst ourselves
                      (selves = MARCH) first is always a motivation, soas to both get more And
                      give more, and ultimately see that that the area of interest gets served.
                      I'd be perfectly willing to submit lists of wanted and available things to
                      an us-only craigslist sort of thing... either with the books separated or
                      without.

                      Switching topics a bit, the world energy situation does make me drive my 20
                      mpg beast less, and look towards electronically coordinated exchanges (IE
                      the us-only craigslist) as part of the solution. And much appreciation for
                      that coordinated collection of people called a Swapmeet. Ours could
                      potentially have everything logically exchanged in the weeks before the
                      physical exchange. Just the thing when moving those 200 lb systems in your
                      economy car.

                      I see no complicated infrastructure, just a few days picked for infoAge
                      gatherings to work/paint/pizza/whatever with the swapping done discretely
                      during the day/weekend.

                      John A.
                      I'll say it: Merry Christmas
                    • B. Degnan
                      A February meeting of March?
                      Message 10 of 16 , Dec 28, 2007
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                        A February meeting of March?

                        At 02:00 PM 12/28/2007 -0500, you wrote:
                        > > In theory, we could even have a special bin for "MARCH Miscellaneous"
                        > > .... magazines, software, game cartridges, even the occasional whole
                        > > computer!
                        >
                        >I think this idea got rejected, if I read the flow correctly, I'll just say
                        >that the idea of trading things (things = things, books) amongst ourselves
                        >(selves = MARCH) first is always a motivation, soas to both get more And
                        >give more, and ultimately see that that the area of interest gets served.
                        >I'd be perfectly willing to submit lists of wanted and available things to
                        >an us-only craigslist sort of thing... either with the books separated or
                        >without.
                        >
                        >Switching topics a bit, the world energy situation does make me drive my 20
                        >mpg beast less, and look towards electronically coordinated exchanges (IE
                        >the us-only craigslist) as part of the solution. And much appreciation for
                        >that coordinated collection of people called a Swapmeet. Ours could
                        >potentially have everything logically exchanged in the weeks before the
                        >physical exchange. Just the thing when moving those 200 lb systems in your
                        >economy car.
                        >
                        >I see no complicated infrastructure, just a few days picked for infoAge
                        >gatherings to work/paint/pizza/whatever with the swapping done discretely
                        >during the day/weekend.
                        >
                        >John A.
                        >I'll say it: Merry Christmas
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Mike Loewen
                        In case you TRS-80 fans missed it, take a look at this: Ebay #280187570207 A Model II graphics board sold for $787.50! That s more than I paid for my IBM 129
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jan 4, 2008
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                          In case you TRS-80 fans missed it, take a look at this:

                          Ebay #280187570207

                          A Model II graphics board sold for $787.50! That's more than I paid
                          for my IBM 129 keypunch...


                          Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                          Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                        • Mike Hatch
                          Looks like a bidding war for that graphics board between two people then cpmuseum pipped them both at the end, beyond my funds. cpmuseum has been laying
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jan 4, 2008
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                            Looks like a bidding war for that graphics board between two people
                            then "cpmuseum" pipped them both at the end, beyond my funds.

                            "cpmuseum" has been laying out some serious cash in the last month for
                            older computer kit, see some of the recent auctions at
                            http://myworld.ebay.co.uk/cpmuseum/

                            Mike.
                            www.soemtron.org
                            www.brickfieldspark.org


                            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Loewen <mloewen@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > In case you TRS-80 fans missed it, take a look at this:
                            >
                            > Ebay #280187570207
                            >
                            > A Model II graphics board sold for $787.50! That's more than I
                            paid
                            > for my IBM 129 keypunch...
                            >
                            >
                            > Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                            > Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                            >
                          • Ian King
                            Ah, the 129! I learned my first programming language - Fortran - on one of those. -- Ian _____ From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jan 5, 2008
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                              Ah, the 129!  I learned my first programming language - Fortran - on one of those.  -- Ian


                              From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike Loewen
                              Sent: Friday, January 04, 2008 4:19 AM
                              To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [midatlanticretro] TRS-80 madness


                              In case you TRS-80 fans missed it, take a look at this:

                              Ebay #280187570207

                              A Model II graphics board sold for $787.50! That's more than I paid
                              for my IBM 129 keypunch...

                              Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic. scol.pa.us
                              Old Technology http://sturgeon. css.psu.edu/ ~mloewen/ Oldtech/

                            • Kelly Leavitt
                              And I thought it might go for less than $200. Man am I out of my league here. Kelly ... From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jan 6, 2008
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                                And I thought it might go for less than $200. Man am I out of my league here.
                                 
                                Kelly
                                 
                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Mike Loewen
                                Sent: Friday, January 04, 2008 7:19 AM
                                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: [midatlanticretro] TRS-80 madness


                                In case you TRS-80 fans missed it, take a look at this:

                                Ebay #280187570207

                                A Model II graphics board sold for $787.50! That's more than I paid
                                for my IBM 129 keypunch...

                                Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic. scol.pa.us
                                Old Technology http://sturgeon. css.psu.edu/ ~mloewen/ Oldtech/


                                No virus found in this outgoing message.
                                Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.17.13/1211 - Release Date: 1/6/2008 11:57 AM

                              • Mike Loewen
                                ... Same here, except I started on the 029. Later on, I went backwards, and used an 026 in the Air Force. Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic.scol.pa.us Old
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jan 6, 2008
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                                  On Sat, 5 Jan 2008, Ian King wrote:

                                  > Ah, the 129! I learned my first programming language - Fortran - on one of
                                  > those. -- Ian

                                  Same here, except I started on the 029. Later on, I went backwards,
                                  and used an 026 in the Air Force.

                                  Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                                  Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                                • Ian King
                                  I, too, went backwards, but to the 029, on which I learned BASIC. :-) _____ From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com]
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jan 6, 2008
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                                    I, too, went backwards, but to the 029, on which I learned BASIC.  :-) 


                                    From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike Loewen
                                    Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2008 8:52 AM
                                    To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [midatlanticretro] RE: 129 keypunch

                                    On Sat, 5 Jan 2008, Ian King wrote:

                                    > Ah, the 129! I learned my first programming language - Fortran - on one of
                                    > those. -- Ian

                                    Same here, except I started on the 029. Later on, I went backwards,
                                    and used an 026 in the Air Force.

                                    Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic. scol.pa.us
                                    Old Technology http://sturgeon. css.psu.edu/ ~mloewen/ Oldtech/

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