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Vintage Sun systems

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  • Mike Loewen
    Are there others in the group who also collect Sun workstations, in addition to our more classic systems? Suns have interested me since I first worked with a
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 23, 2007
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      Are there others in the group who also collect Sun workstations, in
      addition to our more classic systems? Suns have interested me since I
      first worked with a 3/60 back in 1988. The 3/60 was a desktop Unix
      workstation, with a 32-bit Motorola 68020 CPU running at 20MHz and a 68881
      coprocessor, maximum of 24MB RAM, and built-in ethernet (AUI/BNC). Its
      operating system was SunOS, which was based on BSD Unix.

      I bought my first Sun in the early '90s, an IPC which was powered by a
      SPARC processor running at 25MHz. It still runs, although I've had to
      replace the battery backed NVRAM chip which has died by now on all Suns of
      this vintage.

      I've acquired several more Suns in the past few months, including a
      dual processor SPARCstation 10 and a dual processor Ultra 2, and have them
      all working. The oldest is the IPC from 1990, and the newest is an Ultra
      10 from 1998. Various OS versions are loaded on them, from NetBSD-2.0 on
      the IPC, to the current release of Solaris 10 on the Ultra 2.

      Here's the Sun section from my collection site:

      http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/Sun/

      We now return you to your 8-bit systems... :-)


      Mike Loewen mloewen@...
      Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
    • billdeg@degnanco.com
      I used to do PC emulation on a SUN Intel 386 box. I would compile code and dump to a 8088 GRiD laptop. Bill
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 23, 2007
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        I used to do PC emulation on a SUN Intel 386 box. I would compile code
        and dump to a 8088 GRiD laptop.
        Bill


        >
        > Are there others in the group who also collect Sun workstations, in
        > addition to our more classic systems? Suns have interested me since I
        > first worked with a 3/60 back in 1988. The 3/60 was a desktop Unix
        > workstation, with a 32-bit Motorola 68020 CPU running at 20MHz and a 68881
        > coprocessor, maximum of 24MB RAM, and built-in ethernet (AUI/BNC). Its
        > operating system was SunOS, which was based on BSD Unix.
        >
        > I bought my first Sun in the early '90s, an IPC which was powered by a
        > SPARC processor running at 25MHz. It still runs, although I've had to
        > replace the battery backed NVRAM chip which has died by now on all Suns of
        > this vintage.
        >
        > I've acquired several more Suns in the past few months, including a
        > dual processor SPARCstation 10 and a dual processor Ultra 2, and have them
        > all working. The oldest is the IPC from 1990, and the newest is an Ultra
        > 10 from 1998. Various OS versions are loaded on them, from NetBSD-2.0 on
        > the IPC, to the current release of Solaris 10 on the Ultra 2.
        >
        > Here's the Sun section from my collection site:
        >
        > http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/Sun/
        >
        > We now return you to your 8-bit systems... :-)
        >
        >
        > Mike Loewen mloewen@...
        > Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Sellam Ismail
        ... Ah, the Sun 386i. That was one of the computers I shipped to Philadelphia recently for that expert work I did ;) -- Sellam Ismail
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 23, 2007
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          On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 billdeg@... wrote:

          > I used to do PC emulation on a SUN Intel 386 box. I would compile code
          > and dump to a 8088 GRiD laptop.

          Ah, the Sun 386i. That was one of the computers I shipped to Philadelphia
          recently for that expert work I did ;)

          --

          Sellam Ismail Vintage Computer Festival
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          International Man of Intrigue and Danger http://www.vintage.org

          [ Old computing resources for business || Buy/Sell/Trade Vintage Computers ]
          [ and academia at www.VintageTech.com || at http://marketplace.vintage.org ]
        • B. Degnan
          ... My old company offered to give me the thing when I left because no one else used it, but I left it behind. I was the only one who knew how to fix it. For
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 24, 2007
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            At 10:12 PM 10/23/2007 -0700, you wrote:
            >On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 billdeg@... wrote:
            >
            > > I used to do PC emulation on a SUN Intel 386 box. I would compile code
            > > and dump to a 8088 GRiD laptop.
            >
            >Ah, the Sun 386i. That was one of the computers I shipped to Philadelphia
            >recently for that expert work I did ;)


            My old company offered to give me the thing when I left because no one else
            used it, but I left it behind. I was the only one who knew how to fix
            it. For the benefit of those who did not ever see one of these it had an
            interesting type of mouse that used a metallic mouse pad embossed with a
            tiny grid. From memory I recall the mouse pointed a light (type?) at the
            grid and was able to use the returned position to know where to display the
            mouse pointer on the screen.

            Bill
          • Mike Loewen
            ... Here s a picture of the mouse and pad: http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/Sun/IPC-4L.jpg Sun used those (optical) mice for years on their
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 24, 2007
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              On Wed, 24 Oct 2007, B. Degnan wrote:

              > My old company offered to give me the thing when I left because no one else
              > used it, but I left it behind. I was the only one who knew how to fix
              > it. For the benefit of those who did not ever see one of these it had an
              > interesting type of mouse that used a metallic mouse pad embossed with a
              > tiny grid. From memory I recall the mouse pointed a light (type?) at the
              > grid and was able to use the returned position to know where to display the
              > mouse pointer on the screen.

              Here's a picture of the mouse and pad:

              http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/Sun/IPC-4L.jpg

              Sun used those (optical) mice for years on their systems, until
              switching to a mechanical mouse on the Sun type 5 keyboards. In between,
              there was a newer optical mouse that used a higher density grid pad.

              The 386i was a very slow machine, and had either a 386-20 or 386-25
              CPU.


              Mike Loewen mloewen@...
              Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
            • Sridhar Ayengar
              ... Once upon a time, there were quite a few Suns that had mice like that. It was the only way to do optical mice back in the day. Peace... Sridhar
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 24, 2007
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                B. Degnan wrote:
                > At 10:12 PM 10/23/2007 -0700, you wrote:
                >> On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 billdeg@... wrote:
                >>
                >>> I used to do PC emulation on a SUN Intel 386 box. I would compile code
                >>> and dump to a 8088 GRiD laptop.
                >> Ah, the Sun 386i. That was one of the computers I shipped to Philadelphia
                >> recently for that expert work I did ;)
                >
                >
                > My old company offered to give me the thing when I left because no one else
                > used it, but I left it behind. I was the only one who knew how to fix
                > it. For the benefit of those who did not ever see one of these it had an
                > interesting type of mouse that used a metallic mouse pad embossed with a
                > tiny grid. From memory I recall the mouse pointed a light (type?) at the
                > grid and was able to use the returned position to know where to display the
                > mouse pointer on the screen.

                Once upon a time, there were quite a few Suns that had mice like that.
                It was the only way to do optical mice back in the day.

                Peace... Sridhar
              • Herb Johnson
                ... Sure! I don t collect them as much as resell them, or I used to when there was supply and demand. Not much demand now, and I m not seeing them like I did
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 26, 2007
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                  Mike Loewen <mloewen@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Are there others in the group who also collect Sun
                  > workstations, in addition to our more classic systems?

                  Sure! I don't "collect" them as much as resell them, or I used to
                  when there was supply and demand. Not much demand now, and I'm not
                  seeing them like I did a few years ago when they were being replaced
                  at businesses and universities.

                  I have a Web page of Sun and SGI stuff at:

                  http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/sgi.html

                  But I myself have parted out most of what I used to have, except the
                  very oldest systems. I have a few of the 3/ series single-board
                  systems that I'll get back to and review next year. They are
                  interesting from sheer age and processor - as you posted, they are 68K
                  based systems. A few years ago I sold a very old Multibus based Sun
                  system, very early, to someone in Europe who still writes to tell me
                  his progress on it.

                  The UltraSPARC stuff should be running as it's only a decade old. If
                  you want some SPARCstation 10 parts, contact me, I think I have a box
                  of pulled parts for which you must pay shipping plus something.

                  Herb Johnson

                  Herbert R. Johnson, phone 609-771-1417, New Jersey USA
                  http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/ web site
                  http://www.retrotechnology.net/herbs_stuff/ domain mirror
                  my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
                  if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
                  "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
                  S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"
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